Archive for the ‘recalls’ Category

China sees ‘danger’ in Taiwan’s U.N. intent

September 7, 2007

By  Joseph Curl and David R. Sands
The Washington Times
September 7, 2007

Chinese President Hu Jintao yesterday told President Bush that the next two years will be a time of “high danger” for Taiwan, as the island republic prepares again to apply for a seat in the United Nations.

The U.S. and Chinese presidents made an unusual joint appeal against a planned Taiwanese referendum on the U.N. bid after a bilateral talk on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific regional summit here. Beijing considers Taiwan part of its territory, and Washington has long urged both sides to avoid moves that would upset the present diplomatic stalemate.

Read the rest at:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/
article?AID=/20070907/NATION/
109070093/1001

Bush, China’s President Hu Strike Agreements

September 6, 2007

By Paul Wiseman, USA Today
September 6, 2007

SYDNEY — President Bush accepted an invitation Thursday to attend the Beijing Olympics next year, agreed to set up a military hotline with China and received assurances from Chinese President Hu Jintao that Beijing is serious about cracking down on unsafe products.

胡锦涛
Hu Jintao
Hu Jintao

In a 90-minute meeting at a Sydney hotel, Bush and Hu covered some of the thornier topics in a relationship Bush has described as “complex”: U.S.-China trade relations; North Korea’s nuclear program; and tensions between China and Taiwan. But both men described the meeting as “cordial.”

“He’s an easy man to talk to,” Bush said. “I’m very comfortable in my discussions with President Hu.”

Read the rest at:

http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2007-09-06-bush-apec_N.htm

Bush, China’s Hu tackle thorny issues

September 6, 2007

By Tom Raum, Associated Press 

SYDNEY, Australia – President Bush and Chinese President Hu Jintao tackled contentious issues on Thursday, from climate change and Iran and North Korea to recalls of tainted Chinese food and individual freedoms in China.

“He’s an easy man to talk to. I’m very comfortable in my discussions with President Hu,” Bush said after a face-to-face meeting that lasted about 90 minutes on the sidelines of an Asia-Pacific economic summit.

Hu called the discussion “candid and friendly,” even though it touched on deep U.S.-Chinese differences.

Read it all:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070906/ap_
on_re_au_an/bush;_ylt=AuvBrL_
XKEFf97CKObvKmXms0NUE

China: ‘Trust but verify’ needed

August 31, 2007

John E. Carey
The Washington Times
August 26, 2007  

President Ronald Reagan, asked if he trusted his main communist adversary, Soviet leader Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev, said: “Trust, but verify.”

That may be the best way to describe how everyone who does business with China should operate. A long series of product safety scandals rocked both China the producer and almost all other nations, China’s customers, since last December. The lesson for the West certainly is, “Trust, But Verify.”

We consulted with a manufacturing process and quality specialist with experience in China who told us: “I found it impossible to get companies in China to acknowledge that foreign customers needed to exert some control over the process and thus the product. The Chinese just would not listen. Now they are reaping the result.”

The process engineer finished with this: “It is quite impossible for any Chinese official to guarantee anything in China because of the lack of control that the government has and the lack of standards we take for granted in the West.”

Even so, on Aug. 18, China’s director of product safety, Li Changjiang, said on China’s state TV network, “More than 99 percent of our goods meet standards. Demonizing Chinese products, or talking of the Chinese product threat, I think is simply a new kind of trade protectionism.”

He went on to say this last nine months of scandal and bad news about China’s products was all “politically motivated, unfair, biased and poisoned by jealousy.”

Maybe so Most Honorable Li Changjiang, but since your TV appearance

–The government of New Zealand began to investigate clothing imports from China after some were found to contain dangerously high levels of the chemical formaldehyde. Concentrations up to 900 times the normal safe level of formaldehyde were found in woolen and cotton clothes from China. A physician told us, on the condition of anonymity, “This level of formaldehyde is toxic, even cancer causing.”

–A Beijing factory was found to have recycled used chopsticks and sold up to 100,000 pairs a day without any form of disinfection. This is so blatantly wrong and dangerous that no further comment is necessary.

–The U.S. corporation that imports SpongBob SquarePants journals made in China announced that the products contain toxic lead paint. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission ordered a recall.

And just to remind the Most Honorable Li Changjiang, on Aug. 5, China’s deputy head of the State Food and Drug Administration, Hui Lusheng, said: “At present, the food safety situation has improved, yet is still serious.”

“Since last year reports of ‘red-yolk duck eggs’ and so on have often caused wide concern in society about food safety, and warned us that our country is in a period of high risk,” Ms. Hui said, referring to a contaminated egg scare.

“Dealing with and preventing food safety risks is a long-term, arduous and complicated project, which needs society to work together and comprehensive prevention,” she added.

Toys, toothpaste, cough syrup, seafood, eggs, pet food and a host of other products made in China have been found to be unsafe, poisonous or toxic since last December.

And China has been less than 100 percent truthful. China rarely if ever speaks the truth. And now the world knows.

But many in the world knew before, or should have. And companies such as America’s Mattel Inc., the toy company, did not do due diligence by properly verifying Chinese claims and thoroughly inspecting products made in China. Mattel had to recall 18.7 million toys. One Mattel executive, who asked us not to use his name, told us, “We lost control of the manufacturing process.”

“There is no excuse for lead to be found in toys entering this country,” said the acting chairwoman of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Nancy A. Nord. “It’s totally unacceptable and it needs to stop.

Children were put at risk. The head of one of the Chinese companies involved committed suicide. All this was unnecessary.

Pssst. American companies: You cannot trust China. You have to verify.

So Pssst. China. Get with the rest of the world. Join the 21st century. Abide by our product requirements. Read, understand and follow the specifications. Enforce your laws, make new regulations where needed, and admit the truth.

Finally, there are geostrategic implications to all of this. China holds more U.S. debt that almost any nation except Japan. China now is one of the largest manufacturers of American goods. China has embarked on a huge military build-up. But nobody knows how much China is spending on defense, and procurement projects are shrouded in secrecy.

Adm. Timothy J. Keating, head of the U.S. Pacific Command, said recently of China, “We are watching very carefully.”

The problem with China is that you cannot always see through to the truth.

John E. Carey is former president of International Defense Consultants Inc. and a frequent contributor to The Washington Times. He has lived in China.

Related:
China Watch

Beijing Has No Control Over Food Safety

China Called Threat to World Peace

If China Has Nothing to Hide, Why Do They Hide So Much So Often?

China: You Won’t Get The Truth

China’s Very Own Reality: Scandals “Politically motivated, unfair, biased and poisoned by jealousy”

August 19, 2007

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
August 20, 2007

Tainted seafood. Poisoned toothpaste. Cough Syrup that may have killed over 100 in Panama. Even toys with lead-based paint. Why? “Politically motivated, unfair, biased and poisoned by jealousy,” says China’s director of product safety, the Most Honorable Li Changjiang.

Just when you think China will come clean and admit that there were real tangible problems, the running back dodges a tackler and runs toward the goal posts.

China lives on denials, lies, suppression of news and obfuscation.And in this run up to the Beijing Summer Olympics, words from Chinese officials are less reliable than ever.

Have you noticed that all China’s factory workers wear hats or hair nets? You’ll never find a hair painted into a child’s toy from China but the paint might be lead-based, which is poisonous.

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, at the height of the seafood problems, China’s “farm-fed” seafood came packed with antibiotics. That’s because they are fed on human excrement. If you soak your Chinese shrimp too long in warm water, the “pink” runs out. It is dye: there to make the seafood look more appealing.

The Chinese answer to all of this, weaving back and forth from near truth to outright ridiculous lies, includes this mystically Chinese answer given on China’s state TV network yesterday: “It’s not a severe winter, but there is a cold wind blowing,” the Most Honorable Li Changjiang said.

“This cold wind has been a big trial for the industry … But I think most of our companies can endure this test. Why do I say this? Because our exports keep going up.”

“More than 99 percent of our goods meet standards,” he added. “Demonizing Chinese products, or talking of the Chinese product threat, I think is simply a new kind of trade protectionism.”

It is all “politically motivated, unfair, biased and poisoned by jealousy.”

Forget O.J. Simpson. There is an entire government above 1.3 billion people that has mastered “spin” better than anyone: China.

On August 5, 2007, deputy head of the State Food and Drug Administration, Hui Lusheng, said, “At present, the food safety situation has improved, yet is still serious.”

“Since last year reports of ‘red-yolk duck eggs’ and so on have often caused wide concern in society about food safety, and warned us that our country is in a period of high risk,” Hui said, referring to a contaminated egg scare.

“Dealing with and preventing food safety risks is a long-term, arduous and complicated project, which needs society to work together and comprehensive prevention,” she added.

So on the one hand we have, “long-term, arduous and complicated.”

On the other hand, from a more senior person and less than a month later, we have, “Politically motivated, unfair, biased and poisoned by jealousy.”

This is today’s communist China. China lives on denials, lies, suppression of news and obfuscation.

Nobody should be fooled.

Related:
China: You Won’t Get The Truth
and
China: At Long Last Admits Food Safety Clean Up Will Be “Arduous,” Long Term

If China Has Nothing to Hide, Why Do They Hide So Much So Often?

Psst. China!

China lashes ‘irresponsible’ reaction to safety woes

August 16, 2007

BEIJING (AFP) – China on Thursday hit out at the foreign press and “irresponsible people” for raising fears about Chinese-made toys and other exports that have been recalled due to safety concerns.

“Some media and irresponsible people take a small problem and make it into a large one,”

Commerce Ministry spokesman Wang Xinpei told reporters when asked about various recalls, most recently by US toy giant Mattel.

“The Chinese government steadfastly opposes these actions by irresponsible people.”

Most of recalled products made in China

August 16, 2007

By Jen Haberkorn and Kara Rowland
The Washington Times
August 16, 2007

Two-thirds of the products recalled in the United States so far this year were manufactured in China, according to analysis by The Washington Times.

Of the 234 items recalled by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) this year, 154 were manufactured in China, 43 were manufactured in the United States and 37 were manufactured elsewhere in the world.

Recalled products run the gamut from children’s jewelry, car seats and toys to gas grills, furniture and all-terrain vehicles. Many products were recalled without injuries. But some did cause injuries, including a remote-controlled airplane that exploded as it left the user’s hand on numerous occasions and injured 33 persons.

The number of Chinese-made product recalls in the United States has doubled in the past five years, according to the nonprofit Consumers Union, which publishes Consumer Reports magazine. Chinese products accounted for 60 percent of the total recalls in the U.S. last year, which numbered 467 — a record.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070816/BUSINESS/108160100/1001

China closes 3 plants on safety concerns

July 21, 2007

SHANGHAI: Chinese regulators said Friday that they had revoked the licenses of three companies that had exported mislabeled drug ingredients and tainted pet food ingredients to the United States and other parts of the world.

By David Barboza
The International Herald Tribune
July 20, 2007

The action comes as Beijing has gone on the offensive, trying to show that regulators here are moving swiftly to help ease global worries about the quality and safety of Chinese exports after months of worrisome product recalls and reports about defective or tainted Chinese goods.

China closed the Taixing Glycerin Factory…

Read the rest:
http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/07/21/
business/21food-web.php