Archive for the ‘racism’ Category

The Audacity of Obama-Wright Rhetoric

March 30, 2008

By Thomas Sowell
The Washington Times
March 30, 2008
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It is painful to watch defenders of Barack Obama tying themselves into knots trying to evade the obvious.

Some are saying that Senator Obama cannot be held responsible for what his pastor, Jeremiah Wright, said. In their version of events, Barack Obama just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time — and a bunch of mean-spirited people are trying to make something out of it.

It makes a good story, but it won’t stand up under scrutiny.

Barack Obama’s own account of his life shows that he consciously sought out people on the far left fringe. In college, “I chose my friends carefully,” he said in his first book, “Dreams From My Father.”

These friends included “Marxist professors and structural feminists and punk rock performance poets” — in Obama’s own words — as well as the “more politically active black students.” He later visited a former member of the terrorist Weatherman underground, who endorsed him when he ran for state senator.

Obama didn’t just happen to encounter Jeremiah Wright, who just happened to say some way out things. Jeremiah Wright is in the same mold as the kinds of people Barack Obama began seeking out in college — members of the left, anti-American counter-culture.

In Shelby Steele’s brilliantly insightful book about Barack Obama — “A Bound Man” — it is painfully clear that Obama was one of those people seeking a racial identity that he had never really experienced in growing up in a white world. He was trying to become a convert to blackness, as it were — and, like many converts, he went overboard.

Nor has Obama changed in recent years. His voting record in the U.S. Senate is the furthest left of any Senator. There is a remarkable consistency in what Barack Obama has done over the years, despite inconsistencies in what he says.

The irony is that Obama’s sudden rise politically to the level of being the leading contender for his party’s presidential nomination has required him to project an entirely different persona, that of a post-racial leader who can heal divisiveness and bring us all together.

The ease with which he has accomplished this chameleon-like change, and entranced both white and black Democrats, is a tribute to the man’s talent and a warning about his reliability.

There is no evidence that Obama ever sought to educate himself on the views of people on the other end of the political spectrum, much less reach out to them. He reached out from the left to the far left.
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That’s bringing us all together?

Is “divisiveness” defined as disagreeing with the agenda of the left?
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Who on the left was ever called divisive by Obama before that became politically necessary in order to respond to revelations about Jeremiah Wright?

One sign of Obama’s verbal virtuosity was his equating a passing comment by his grandmother — “a typical white person,” he says — with an organized campaign of public vilification of America in general and white America in particular, by Jeremiah Wright.

Since all things are the same, except for the differences, and
different except for the similarities, it is always possible to make things look similar verbally, however different they are in the real world.

Among the many desperate gambits by defenders of Senator Obama and Jeremiah Wright is to say that Wright’s words have a “resonance” in the black community.

There was a time when the Ku Klux Klan’s words had a resonance among whites, not only in the South but in other states. Some people joined the KKK in order to advance their political careers. Did that make it OK? Is it all just a matter of whose ox is gored?

While many whites may be annoyed by Jeremiah Wright’s words, a year from now most of them will probably have forgotten about him. But many blacks who absorb his toxic message can still be paying for it, big- time, for decades to come.

Why should young blacks be expected to work to meet educational standards, or even behavioral standards, if they believe the message that all their problems are caused by whites, that the deck is stacked against them? That is ultimately a message of hopelessness, however much audacity it may have.

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It’s Not Compassion — It’s Wright-Wing Racism

March 22, 2008

By Michael Reagan
March 20, 2008
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Most of the media and their fellow liberals were positively giddy over Barack Obama’s speech Tuesday, all but comparing it to the Sermon on the Mount.

I won’t deny it was a masterful piece of oratory — the man can be spellbinding — but when you stop to consider what Sen. Obama was really doing up there on the podium, invoking the specter of slavery and Jim Crow and the era of “whites only,” it becomes clear that it was a con job designed to make the voters as giddy as he knew his worshippers in the submissive media would be.

The speech was meant to be an explanation and expiation of his guilt for his years of remaining mute in the face of the outrageous anti-Americanism spewed by his pastor and bosom buddy, the Reverend Jeremiah Wright.

Until Tuesday, Barack Obama (you can’t use his middle name, which has now become the “H-word,” allegedly a code word for anti-Muslim rhetoric) had steadfastly denied he ever heard his friend and pastor make his hateful remarks. In the speech, however, he just kind of mentioned that… well, yes … he guesses he was aware of the Reverend Wright’s offensive rhetoric after all. Mea Minima Culpa.

He then launched into a defense of his friendship with the man he credited for bringing him to Christianity, and helping to form his social and political philosophy and set him on the path to a life of public service. Admirably, while denouncing Wright’s extremism, he refused to denounce the man himself.

Nobody expected him to declare Wright anathema and cast him into the outer darkness where there is weeping and wailing and the gnashing of teeth — one simply doesn’t do to that sort of thing to a longtime friend, benefactor and mentor even if he has been shown to have slipped the rails time after time.

What was not expected was Barack H. Obama’s use of a litany of America’s past racist offenses to justify not only Wright’s blatant hatred of white America but his suggestion that it was a sentiment shared by most African Americans. And that is simply not true.

Nor was it true, as Obama charged, that the Reagan coalition was created out of white resentment for affirmative action or forced busing.

He charged that “anger over welfare and affirmative action helped forge the Reagan coalition. Politicians routinely exploited fears of crime… talk show hosts and conservative commentators built entire careers unmasking bogus claims of racism while dismissing legitimate discussions of racial injustice and inequality as mere political correctness or reverse racism.”

Poppycock! These are not only outright falsehoods, but echoes of what Obama learned at the feet of Jeremiah Wright and now preaches as his own beliefs. He learned his lessons well.

When he suggested that my father’s coalition was based on anger over affirmative action and welfare he was peddling a blatant falsehood as egregious in its falsity as Wright’s charge that whites created AIDS to wipe out the black population.

Read the rest:
http://www.gopusa.com/commentary/mreagan/2008/mr_03201.shtml

Racism concerns no stranger to pulpit

March 21, 2008

By Jennifer Harper
The WashingtonTimes
March 21, 2008

The tone and ferocity of the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr.’s comments about American racism which came to national attention last week may not be typical in many mainstream black churches. The content — concerns that racism persists — still surfaces at many pulpits, however.
Jeremiah Wright greeting President Bill Clinton during a 1998 prayer breakfast at the White House, to which Clinton had hand chosen Wright to attend.

Jeremiah Wright greeting President Bill Clinton during a 1998 prayer breakfast at the White House, to which Clinton had hand chosen Wright to attend.

“Inflammatory rhetoric is certainly a minor approach to congregations within black Christian circles. That rhetoric needs to be criticized. But the larger agenda Reverend Wright is pointing to, the deep frustration over racism, is a common theme preached at black churches across the country,” said Anthony B. Pinn, a professor of religious studies at Rice University.
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“The topic is viable. The rhetoric is not,” Mr. Pinn added.
“No one can rationally attribute to an estimated 56,000 black American churches the comments of a black pastor in a black church which is a member of a white liberal denomination — the United Church of Christ,” said the Rev. Eugene F. Rivers III of the Azusa Christian Community in Dorchester, Mass.
“Everyone gets the point that those quotes were indefensible and over the top. Everybody gets that,” he said.
Supporters say that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright is misunderstood.
Rev. Jeremiah Wright
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Mr. Wright, who recently retired from the 8,000-member Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, has been family pastor and spiritual guide to Sen. Barack Obama for years. .
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Mr. Wright’s sermons have included stark references to racism. In a highly publicized speech Tuesday, Mr. Obama affirmed his friendship with his pastor but repudiated his extreme opinions.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080321/NATION/961532533/1001

The Origin of Obama’s Pastor Problem

March 20, 2008

By JAMES CARNEY AND AMY SULLIVAN
TIME Magazine
March 20, 2008

The speech he delivered at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia was an artfully reasoned treatise on race and rancor in America, the most memorable speech delivered by any candidate in this campaign and one that has earned Obama comparisons to Lincoln, Kennedy and King. But that doesn’t mean it will succeed in its more prosaic mission of appealing to voters who have their doubts about Obama and his preacher. It left unanswered a crucial question: What attracted Obama to Wright in the first place?

Read it all:
http://news.yahoo.com:80/s/time/20080320/us_
time/theoriginofobamaspastor
problem;_ylt=AiVOE5wlzSUgZFQwMq12ttSs0NUE

Obama: Just An Extremist?

March 19, 2008

Senator Obama is certainly an extremist: labeled the most liberal Senator among the 100 in the Senate.  But apparently he may be a racist, or someone in his election campaign committee could be….

Because only 6% of U.S. media journalists describe themselves as conservatives, the liberal media has allowed Senator Obama to glide though the primary season without too much criticism.

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
March 19, 2008

And I will certainly be called a racist and dismissed as a racist, if not by Senator Obama then by his campaign committee.  That is their modus operandi.  I know this because they have already accused and trashed President Bill Clinton (“The First Black President”) and Geraldine Ferraro (twice).

Geraldine Ferraro
Geraldine Ferraro

Last Tuesday, March 18, 2008, the candidate that promised to transcend race and racism and unite all Americans for change, spoke with admiration about his pastor, a man that brought him to Christianity, married him, preached to him for about twenty years, baptized his children, took his donations of more than $22,000.00 (in one year), and prayed with him before the good Senator started his quest for the White House.

That pastor, one might surmise, is anti-American and racist because of the now infamous comments he has “preached” from the pulpit of his church in the name of Jesus Christ and God Almighty.
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But don’t believe me, a White Man married to a “Person of Color,” just re-read some of the Reverend (some say Bishop) Jeramiah Wright’s sermons.  Or watch the videos and listen to the true bile this man has dished out for years in Christ’s name.

Reverend Wright told his congregation that the Government of the United States was waging a war of genocide against people of color using HIV/AIDS.

I tell you in all honesty: any person of any color who tells me the U.S. government is intentionally killing off its citizens by any means is divisive and deserves condemnation — unless certain proof can be put on the table. 

This came from the religious advisor of a candidate for President of the United States who told us he would unite us and rise above race and racism and condemn those that were divisive.
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., ... 
Senator Obama and Rev. Wright.  Distance between them?

Rev. Wright called the USA “the KKK of A.”

In a sermon on the Sunday after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, Rev. Wright suggested the United States brought on the attacks — by its own terrorism.

“We bombed Hiroshima, we bombed Nagasaki, and we nuked far more than the thousands in New York and the Pentagon, and we never batted an eye,” Wright said. “We have supported state terrorism against the Palestinians and black South Africans, and now we are indignant because the stuff we have done overseas is now brought right back to our own front yards. America’s chickens are coming home to roost.”

In a 2003 sermon, he said Black people, African Americans, should condemn the United States.

“The government gives them the drugs, builds bigger prisons, passes a three-strike law and then wants us to sing ‘God Bless America.’ No, no, no, God damn America, that’s in the Bible for killing innocent people. God damn America for treating our citizens as less than human. God damn America for as long as she acts like she is God and she is supreme.”

So, after participating in services orchestrated by Rev. Wright for twenty years, Senator Obama never said a disparaging remark about his pastor or made an effort to set the record straight.  Until Tuesday.

Senator Obama condemned his pastor for his less than truthful and uniting and honest language but he refused to distance himself by withdrawing from his church, the Trinity United Church of Christ in South Chicago.

And, while uniting us, Senator Obama, apparently seeking an excuse or some justification, invoked the names of George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, his Grandmother, and Geraldine Ferraro (for the second time — but the first time since she resigned from the Hillary Clinton for President campaign).  He even made a veiled reference to “The First Black President.”

Win McNamee, Getty Images

The former President said during the New Hampshire primary about Senator Obama, “Give me a break. This whole thing is the biggest fairy tale I’ve ever seen.”  And for this, and comparing the Obama campaign to the campaign years ago of Jesse Jackson, President Clinton was attacked as a racist.

In his speech Tuesday Senator Obama grabbed all his White racist relatives, friends, and historical icons and threw them under the bus.

For what purpose?  The record of racism by White people is pretty well established, I think, and White America has gone out of its way to atone, I think.

The “Great Uniter” who said he would “Rise Above Race” has played the race card like a two bit Kansas City saloon gambler in 1880.  How many race cards does he have up his sleeve?  And when will we discuss in detail the real issues?

Race is important, sure, but Ken Blackwell of the Family Research organization says Senator Obama favors $1 Billion in new taxes.  In this recession, that will push my bride’s small business into the red — and there are no buyers right now in this economy.

Apparently, and I could be wrong, while Senator Obama was a student at Harvard Law School, he learned how to use slick language and give wonderful sounding speeches.  But he didn’t learn how to make good argument and he missed the chapters on honesty and integrity entirely, I think, if  Tuesday’s speech is an example of his thinking and logic.

But I could be wrong.

Democratic presidential candidate Senator Barack Obama (D-IL) ...
Democratic presidential candidate Senator Barack Obama (D-IL) speaks to supporters during a campaign stop at the University of Charleston in Charleston, West Virginia, March 20, 2008.REUTER/John Sommers II (Reuters)

Related:
Obama Camp Calls Ferraro Racist; She Responds “No Way!”

Bill Clinton Rejects Criticism Over Race

Michelle Obama Takes Heat for Saying She’s ‘Proud of My Country’ for the First Time

Media Still Mostly “Liberal Left”

Obama confronts racial division in US, Talks About Rev. Wright

March 18, 2008
By NEDRA PICKLER and MATT APUZZO, Associated Press Writers

PHILADELPHIA – Democratic Sen. Barack Obama on Tuesday tried to stem damage from divisive comments delivered by his pastor, while bluntly addressing anger between blacks and whites in the most racially pointed speech yet of his presidential campaign.

Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Barack Obama D-Ill., speaks ...
Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Barack Obama D-Ill., speaks about race during an address in Philadelphia, Tuesday, March 18, 2008.
(AP Photo/Alex Brandon) 

Obama confronted America’s legacy of racial division head on, tackling black grievance, white resentment and the uproar over his former pastor’s incendiary statements. Drawing on his half-black, half-white roots as no other presidential hopeful could, Obama asserted: “This union may never be perfect, but generation after generation has shown that it can always be perfected.”

Obama expressed understanding of the passions on both sides in what he called “a racial stalemate we’ve been stuck in for years.”

Related:
The Right Stuff or The Wright Stuff

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080318/ap_on_el_pr/obama_race;_ylt=Aj8
mkpHU6DyxBhTrMpfFLTSs0NUE

Obama’s Pastor “Misunderstood” — Senator to Give Race Address Today

March 18, 2008

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom

In a page one story, the Washington Post explained the feelings at Barak Obama’s Trinity United Church of Christ.

His flock says the Rev. Jeremiah Wright is the victim of “a modern day lynching.”

The question is how much will this hurt Senator Barak Obama in his quest for the White House not IF this will hurt Mr. Obama.

“A simmering controversy over Wright’s provocative rhetoric and his connection to Sen. Barack Obama ignited last week after some of his old sermons were aired, prompting the Democratic presidential candidate to condemn them and severing Wright’s connection to the campaign. But inside this mega-church that Wright built up from financial ruin, his most loyal listeners offered a different interpretation: It is Wright, and black theology in its entirety, that is misunderstood,” wrote Post reporter Eli Saslow. 

Wright’s protege, the Rev. Otis Moss III, stepped to the pulpit Sunday to say, “No matter what they want,” Moss said, “we will not shut up.”
Supporters say that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright is misunderstood.
Supporters say that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright is misunderstood. (Brian Jackson – AP)

Reverend Wright’s raucus sermons have caused a great deal of discussion and concern amid the Democrat’s primary presidential election campaign.

And Senator Obama now says he will discuss his views on race in a major address to just after 10 AM eastern time.  CNN and the Fox News Channel are expected to carry the Senator’s remarks.

We interviewed a seventy-something year old Black American woman yesterday who told us, “In 1954 I was in college.  When I went to register to vote, I was given a literacy exam by an illiterate White man at the registration office.  He could never have passed it —  but White people didn’t even take it.  The exam was meant to keep Black Americans from voting.  So I know racism.”

“Rev. Wright must have experienced a lot of hurt that makes him say what he says.  But his views are not the views of Barak Obama.  The pastor has one view and Barak has another.  Each has ideas formed by their experience and each has a right to speak out,” she told us.

Several others we spoke to agreed with her.

But the voters will decide this issue.

The sad thing is that race has become a very divisive issue in a campaign meant to unite people toward a common good.

Related:
Congregation Defends Obama’s Ex-Pastor

On Defensive, Obama Plans Talk on Race

Bill Clinton Rejects Criticism Over Race

Senator Obama: “Give Me A Break”

Outspoken Minister Out Of Obama Campaign

Senator Obama: That’s Hate Speech, Not a “Sermon”
http://www.nowpublic.com/culture/senator-obama-thats-hate-speech-not-sermon

Obama is now unelectable
http://www.nowpublic.com/world/obama-now-unelectable

Bill Clinton Rejects Criticism Over Race

March 17, 2008

By Beth Fouhy, Associated Press 

NEW YORK (March 17) – Former President Clinton is pushing back on criticism that he fanned racial tension while campaigning for his wife in South Carolina.

Win McNamee, Getty Images

In an interview with ABC’s “Good Morning America” broadcast Monday, Clinton said he had gotten a “bum rap” from the news media after he compared Democratic Sen. Barack Obama’s landslide victory in South Carolina’s Jan. 26 primary to Jesse Jackson’s wins in the state in 1984 and 1988. Clinton was widely criticized for appearing to cast Obama as little more than a black candidate popular in a state with a heavily black electorate.

“They made up a race story out of that,” Clinton said of the news media, calling the story “a bizarre spin.”

He made similar comments on CNN’s “American Morning,” calling the notion that he had unfairly criticized Obama in South Carolina as “a total myth and a mugging.”

While campaigning in South Carolina in January, Bill Clinton complained that Obama had put out a “hit job” on him. He didn’t explain what that meant.

At an MTV forum for college journalists Saturday, Clinton said he knew as soon as Obama won Iowa’s caucuses Jan. 3 that he was on his way to wrapping up a large majority of black voters in other primary states.

Read the rest:
http://news.aol.com/elections/story/_a/bill-clinton-rejects-criticism-over-race/20080317140909990002?ncid=NWS00010000000001

Race Issue Marring Election Unnecessarily

March 14, 2008

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom

This is an election featuring a Black Man and a White Woman – but mentioning that fact might get you accused of racism, bigotry, fanaticism, zealotry and other forms of treachery.

Take Geraldine Ferraro, for example.  She was quoted recently is a California newspaper saying, “If Obama was a white man, he would not be in this position. And if he was a woman [of any color] he would not be in this position. He happens to be very lucky to be who he is. And the country is caught up in the concept.”

Former vice-presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro addresses ... 

Obama surrogates unloaded on her; inferring if not saying outright that she was a racist.

Hillary, instead of running to her friend’s assistance, said, “I didn’t say it.”

Many in the Black American community acted appalled.

Give me a break.

This came closely on the heels of another firestorm caused when an Obama advisor called Senator Clinton a “Monster.”

Even Bill Clinton, once referred to as “The First Black President,” has taken the heat and been tarred and feathered as a bigot from Black Church pulpits.

Sum up all the criticism from Black toward white and you find one word in the undercurrent: division.

The only guy that hasn’t taken too much heat for his over the top language is long-time Obama pastor Reverend Jeremiah A. Wright Jr.  He said “God Bless America” should be changed to “God Damn America,” he implied that America deserved the carnage of September 11, 2001, and he more than hinted that the KKK was running things in America. 

Barack Obama, Rev. Jeremiah Wright

Not divisive, right?

If you think it is, I dare you to criticize him.  The Black Leader Union will attack you for sure.

When a recent study reported that one quarter of America’s teenage girls has a sexually transmitted disease, you just about had to read the fine print before you saw that the study also concluded that fully fifty percent of the teenage Black girls had an STD. To use this fact in a headline, one newspaper editor told me, would be “Journalistic suicide.”

You cannot fix problems until you face them.  And it is difficult to face issues unless and until you can discuss them.

So the Black Leadership Union of America has created and fosters an atmosphere of ignoring facts and not facing the truth.  This allows them to perpetuate the idea that White people are holding the Black population back.  And it allows these so-called Black Leaders to sustain their “positions,” “reputations” and don’t forget donations.

Bill Cosby is among just a handful of Black Leaders that has been critical of his own Black people. For his efforts he has been roundly criticized by other members of the Black American Leadership Union and called an “Uncle Tom” in many churches.

I spend a significant amount of time in the Asian-American community.  Last Sunday we taught English as a Second Language to Vietnamese-American immigrants and just yesterday I worked with Korean-Americans on their language skills.

When I asked them about race being used in this election and all the reflections and facets of that use, I was simply told by Asian-Americans, “It’s not polite.”

Last night during a public appearance, while refusing to talk about her controversial comment about Obama, Geraldine Ferraro made the audience pause when she took a shot at how Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas — a Republican and the second black judge to sit on the court — gained admittance to Yale University’s law school.
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“Take a look and think about Justice Thurgood Marshall,” said Ferraro, referring to the first black judge to sit on the high court, “who drew on his life experiences as an African-American and as a civil-rights activist to write some of the greatest civil-rights decisions of the sixties and of the entire century.” Then she said that she did not think Thomas showed the same “sensitivity” as Marshall. Thomas, Ferraro said, acts as a rubber stamp for conservative Justice Antonin Scalia and “votes against affirmative action, which got him into Yale.”

Geraldine, you apparently just don’t get it.  Despite laws protecting your freedom to speak out, the Black Leader Union is watching you now and they’re ready to pounce.

Is this good for America, do you think?

I am not a racist.  But I expect I’ll be accused of that because of this essay.

The plain things nobody can say

March 14, 2008

By Wesley Pruden
The Washington Times
March 14, 2008

We’re doomed to a bitter, rancid presidential campaign, fraught with peril, and not just for John McCain. For Barack Obama, too. And let’s not forget Hillary, as a lot of people are eager to do.
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The Obama campaign, if not necessarily the man himself, seems determined to make tough questioning of the man and his qualifications off-limits. Mild, general criticism is OK, barely, but pressing too hard with the wrong questions is taken for racism, bigotry, fanaticism, zealotry and other forms of treachery. Once upon a time, presidential candidates labored mightily to find a log-cabin birthplace in their past, but some Democrats think they’ve come up with a candidate born in a manger.
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As the sheen on the Obama image dissipates, as sheen surely will under the full weight of a presidential campaign, American voters will expect to indulge their right to say what they think about the candidates. If they must be ever-so-careful to criticize Barack Obama in the robust and rowdy way they feel free to criticize everybody else, reticence will quickly become resentment, and ultimately, just in time for November, revulsion. Sen. Obama deserves better.
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Racism, the unpardonable sin in modern America, has made race the unmentionable subject, no matter how delicately broached or innocently discussed. Such good faith as the speaker may bring to the conversation no longer counts for very much. With her airy comment to a California newspaper, the Torrance Daily Breeze, suggesting that Barack Obama wouldn’t be the marketing man’s dream if he were not a black man, Geraldine Ferraro made herself a candidate for boiling in oil. (Extra-virgin olive oil, you might be tempted to say, if she were anyone but an Italian-American.) She concedes she was chosen by Walter Mondale for his running mate because she was a woman and what she actually said about the senator from Illinois was inartfully phrased: “If Obama were a white man, he would not be in this position. He happens to be very lucky to be who he is. And the country is caught up in the concept.”
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This is what you can hear, privately expressed by any number of prominent Democrats, some of them white and some of them black. The Clintons have done themselves and, more important, the nation ill by their desperate and not-so-subtle invocation of race. Barack Obama is not wholly innocent, either. Bubba has taken heat, for example, for describing Sen. Obama’s description of his public record as “a fairy tale.” This sounds at first hearing a cruel dig at gays, but no, it was taken as a racist taunt. We weren’t told why.
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Now two more prominent Democrats have entangled themselves in the snare that is the mark of the campaign. Mark Penn, the chief Clinton strategist, told reporters that “we believe the Pennsylvania primary will show that Hillary is ready to win, and that Sen. Obama really can’t win the general election.”
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That’s one man’s opinion, worth less than what Hillary’s paying for it. He later tried to revise his remarks (but only congressmen get to do that, and only in the Congressional Record), saying that losing the Pennsylvania primary would raise questions about Sen. Obama’s ability to win. Then Nancy Pelosi, the House speaker, scoffed that there would be no “dream ticket” of Hillary and Obama, or of Obama and Hillary. “Take it from me,” she said. “That won’t be the ticket.”
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Knowing better, perhaps, she declined to say why. But she’s probably reflecting the conventional unstated wisdom in Washington: You can’t expect to break both the color line and the glass ceiling in one election. When someone asked the speaker what she thought of Geraldine Ferraro’s earlier remarks, she replied: “It’s important that perceptions be understood by the campaigns.”
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This is the kind of code speak we’re all required to use. It’s unfair to Barack Obama, it’s unfair to his opponents whoever they are, and it’s unfair to the rest of us. We’ll know we’ve eliminated racism, the real thing, when we can all talk like grown-ups, in front of one another.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/article/20080314/
NATION01/92656787