Archive for the ‘presidency’ Category

FDR and Obama: Similar in Anticipated Trouble, Hope?

November 21, 2008

Americans knew they were in for hard times when they elected Franklin Delano Roosevelt.  They were seeking hope.  But they had no idea of what really God had placed ahead.

Most of this is from Wikipedia:

FDR was the the thirty-second President of the United States. Elected to four terms in office, he served from 1933 to 1945 and is the only U.S. president to have served more than two terms. Franklin and Theodore Roosevelt were related but only distantly. They were fifth cousins. He was a central figure of the 20th century during a time of worldwide economic crisis and world war.

During the Great Depression of the 1930s, Roosevelt created the New Deal to provide relief for the unemployed, recovery of the economy, and reform of the economic and banking systems.

Although recovery of the economy was incomplete until almost 1940, the programs he initiated such as the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) continue to have instrumental roles in the nation’s commerce. One of his most important legacies is the Social Security system.

As Britain warred with Nazi Germany, Roosevelt provided Lend-Lease aid to Winston Churchill and the British war effort before America’s entry into World War II in December, 1941. On the home front he introduced price controls and rationing, and relocation camps for 120,000 Japanese-Americans. Roosevelt led the United States as it became the ‘Arsenal of Democracy‘. Roosevelt, working closely with his aide Harry Hopkins, made the United States the principal arms supplier and financier of the Allies. America had a vast expansion of industry, the achievement of full employment, and new opportunities opened for African-Americans and women. The new Conservative coalition argued unemployment disappeared and closed most relief programs like the Works Progress Administratio (WPA) and Civilian Conservation Corps. As the Allies neared victory, Roosevelt played a critical role in shaping the post-war world, particularly through the Yalta Conference and the creation of the United Nations.

FDR consoled America through the Pearl Harbor attack and empowered engineers and scientists to create the atomic bomb.

Through all of FDR’s many trials he was crippled and in a wheel chair or in heavy steel braces.

Barack Obama’s tasks might be tall but as we compare him to FDR we should be cautious.

Related
“American Press has Turned Into a Joke” Comparing Obama To FDR, Lincoln

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Obama’s Victory Is Inspirational, India’s Manmohan Singh Says

November 5, 2008

By Jay Shankar

Nov. 5 (Bloomberg) — India’s Prime Minister Manmohan Singh hailed the election of Barack Obama as the 44th president of the U.S., calling it an inspiration for people everywhere, and sought to build ties with the next administration.

“Your extraordinary journey to the White House will inspire people not only in your country but also around the world,” Singh said in his congratulatory message to the president-elect. “Our two countries, working together to address global issues and challenges, will be an important factor for world peace, stability and progress.”

Singh is reaching out to Obama after President George W. Bush made ties with India one of the key elements of his foreign policy, pushing for the successful conclusion of a civilian nuclear energy agreement between the two nations.

Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and her counterpart, External Affairs Minister Pranab Mukherjee, signed the agreement on Oct. 10, breaking India’s three-decade nuclear isolation and allowing U.S. companies such as General Electric Co. to sell atomic fuel and technology to India’s growing energy sector.

The agreement came after the U.S. helped India secure the right to buy equipment and fuel from the 45-member Nuclear Suppliers Group in September.

Read the rest:
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601091&sid=aODczFAywlqQ

Treatment of Bush Has Been a Disgrace; Emboldens Enemies

November 5, 2008

Especially today, as he hail and honor a new and historic president elect, this might be a good time to reflect upon the way we respect each other in America….

U.S. President George W. Bush speaks with President-elect Sen. ... 
U.S. President George W. Bush speaks with President-elect Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL) during a congratulatory phone call, from the Treaty Room at the White House in Washintgton, November 4, 2008. REUTERS/Eric Draper
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Earlier this year, 12,000 people in San Francisco signed a petition in support of a proposition on a local ballot to rename an Oceanside sewage plant after George W. Bush. The proposition is only one example of the classless disrespect many Americans have shown the president.

By Jeffery Scott Shapiro
The Wall Street Journal
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According to recent Gallup polls, the president’s average approval rating is below 30% — down from his 90% approval in the wake of 9/11. Mr. Bush has endured relentless attacks from the left while facing abandonment from the right.

This is the price Mr. Bush is paying for trying to work with both Democrats and Republicans. During his 2004 victory speech, the president reached out to voters who supported his opponent, John Kerry, and said, “Today, I want to speak to every person who voted for my opponent. To make this nation stronger and better, I will need your support, and I will work to earn it. I will do all I can do to deserve your trust.”

Those bipartisan efforts have been met with crushing resistance from both political parties.

The president’s original Supreme Court choice of Harriet Miers alarmed Republicans, while his final nomination of Samuel Alito angered Democrats. His solutions to reform the immigration system alienated traditional conservatives, while his refusal to retreat in Iraq has enraged liberals who have unrealistic expectations about the challenges we face there.

It seems that no matter what Mr. Bush does, he is blamed for everything. He remains despised by the left while continuously disappointing the right.

Yet it should seem obvious that many of our country’s current problems either existed long before Mr. Bush ever came to office, or are beyond his control. Perhaps if Americans stopped being so divisive, and congressional leaders came together to work with the president on some of these problems, he would actually have had a fighting chance of solving them.

Like the president said in his 2004 victory speech, “We have one country, one Constitution and one future that binds us. And when we come together and work together, there is no limit to the greatness of America.”

Read the rest:
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122584386627599251.html
The Wall Street Journal

Is The Maverick a Closer, or a Loser? Is Obama the Messiah? Tuesday We’ll Know!

November 2, 2008

With 48 hours until Election Day, both McCain and Obama camps predict victory but also prepare for a long night.  Many say Barack Obama seems to be the clear winner.  Is Obama the  Messiah?  The Chosen One?  But wait!  The numbers for John McCain are budging and there are still millions of “undecideds.”  Is McCain a closer or a loser? Mickey Mouse and other nuts collected by ACORN probably won’t vote.  But what will happen?

Acorns in Scotland.jpg

From Fox News

With just 48 hours to go before Election Day, both camps for John McCain and Barack Obama are predicting victory but also positioning themselves for a long night on Tuesday by noting the polls are tight and potentially fraudulent voter registration will be closely monitored.

The latest Investor’s Business Daily-TechnoMetrica poll out Sunday showed the race with just a 2-point spread, with Obama at 46.7 percent, McCain with 44.6 percent and 8.7 percent of the 844 likely voters still undecided.

McCain’s team points to several other polls showing the race tightening as the nation comes into the home stretch this election season. Campaign manager Rick Davis told “FOX News Sunday” not to discount McCain, who was the underdog in the primaries and came roaring back. He and other McCain surrogates predicted the same will happen on Tuesday.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., speaks during a
AP Photo/Terry Gilliam

“Look, this election is moving very quickly. There is no doubt that John McCain is increasing his margins in almost every state in the country right now. And I think that what we’re in for is a slam-bang finish. I mean, it’s going to be wild. I think that we are able to close this campaign,” Davis said.

“Johns a closer, he always has been,” former McCain rival and Tennessee Sen. Fred Thompson said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “He’s been given up for dead — literally and politically. People have been wrong about him before. He’s in his element now. And he’s feeling good about it. So I would not count him out in any stretch of the imagination. I think the election is yet to be decided.”

But with the Gallup Daily Tracking Poll showing McCain down by 11 points and RealClearPolitics averages dating back 10 days or more, Davis began cherry-picking which polls are accurate.

Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., ... 
Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., and his wife Cindy McCain addresses while walking into a rally at the John Long Center on the campus of the University of Scranton, Sunday afternoon, Nov. 2, in Scranton, Pa.(AP Photo/Jimmy May)

The Gallup poll is the most “out of whack with the rest of the country,” he said. “The bottom line is every legitimate poll that has the structure of this race in where the country has been historically has this race closing. It has John McCain on the uptick. It has Barack Obama on the downtick.”

As for the Obama camp, chief strategist David Axelrod told ABC’s “This Week” that the McCain camp is deluding itself into thinking he can stage an historic comeback.

“Well, I mean, I think that he needs to spin some sort of interpretation to keep his troops up. And I understand that. That’s — you know, when you’re at the end of the campaign and things are tilting against you, that’s what you do. I don’t think any objective look at the polls would suggest that,” Axelrod said.

But Axelrod said he is worried about potential new voters not going to the polls because they believe Obama has it wrapped up. But the camp is still celebrating strong early voting numbers, and touting the millions of new voters Obama is bringing to the polls — young people, African Americans and Hispanics who may have never voted before. 

Campaign manager David Plouffe said the Obama team expects at least 130 million voters this election, particularly from states where Democratic registration has increased this year. Plouffe added that Obama is not running a national campaign, he’s focused only on 16 states.

Obama’s chief aide also discounted Davis’ claim that McCain is closing the gap in Pennsylvania, which John Kerry won in 2004; and in Colorado and other states President Bush won in 2004 but are leaning Democratic this year.

“We think we have a decisive edge right now. So John McCain would have to win Election Day by a huge margin to make up those deficits,” Plouffe told “FOX News Sunday.” 

“We do not see the tightening in Pennsylvania that Rick talked about. We’ve campaigned hard in Pennsylvania. We’ve got a great organization. We have 1.2 million more Democrats registered than Republicans. … All of the prime takeaway targets that we’ve been working on for so long we think are in good shape heading to the election. But obviously, we need great turnout on Tuesday,” he continued.

Both sides are also talking about criticism about the voter registration process and how so many millions more people are on the rolls. Plouffe said that any fraud would be investigated, but obvious fraudulent registrants won’t make it into the booth.

“These people aren’t going to vote on Election Day. Mickey Mouse, Tony Roma, are not going to vote,” he said.

But Davis said if there is anything to be concerned about on Election Day, “it’s the manipulation of these voter rolls before the election that’s caused so many problems.”

“We’re not going to stand for it. We think it’s unfortunate. We think it’s sad that they would take this kind of action right before the eve of an election,” he said.

FOX News’ Shannon Bream contributed to this report.

Late Friday: McCain claims he has momentum as Obama expands ads

October 31, 2008

Democrat Barack Obama confidently broadened his advertising Friday into two once reliably Republican states and rival John McCain‘s home state of Arizona even as he chastized the Republican candidate for what he called “say-anything, do-anything politics.” The GOP candidate, nevertheless, insisted to audiences in hotly contested Ohio that momentum has swung his way in the final days of the presidential campaign.

Obama’s campaign, capitalizing on his vast financial resources and a favorable political climate, announced that it was going back up with advertising in Georgia and North Dakota, two GOP states that it had teased with ads earlier in the general election campaign but then abandoned.

By MIKE GLOVER and JIM KUHNHENN, Associated Press Writers
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In Iowa, where his campaign took off with a caucus win Jan. 3, Obama told supporters to expect McCain’s campaign to end in a crescendo of attacks on him. “More of the slash and burn, say-anything, do-anything politics that’s calculated to divide and distract; to tear us apart instead of bringing us together,” Obama told 25,000 in Des Moines.

Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. ... 
Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. shakes hands with supporters at the end of a campaign stop in Steubenville, Ohio., Friday, Oct. 31, 2008.(AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)

The Illinois senator said he admired a presidential candidate who said in 2000, “I will not take the low road to the highest office in this land.”

“Those words were spoken eight years ago by my opponent, John McCain,” Obama said. “But the high road didn’t lead him to the White House then, so this time, he decided to take a different route.”

McCain was spending a second straight day touring economically ailing Ohio, a swing state with 20 electoral votes that McCain aides acknowledge is central to a victory on Tuesday. McCain was behind Obama in polls in the state.

In Ohio’s hard-pressed southeast, McCain whipped up a crowd of several thousand at the county courthouse in Steubenville, telling them, “You’re going to be the battleground state again. You’re going to be the one who decides. I need Ohio and I need you.”

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081031/ap_on_el_pr/campaign_r
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Is Palin Preparing for a 2012 Run?

October 29, 2008

By Roger Simon
Politico

(Oct. 28) – Sarah Palin may soon be free. Soon, she may not have the millstone of John McCain around her neck. And she can begin her race for president in 2012.

Some are already talking about it. In careful terms. If John McCain loses next week, Sarah Palin “has absolutely earned a right to run in 2012,” says Greg Mueller, who was a senior aide in the presidential campaigns of Pat Buchanan and Steve Forbes. Mueller says Palin has given conservatives “hope” and “something to believe in.”
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And even if the McCain-Palin ticket does win on Nov. 4 — and Mueller says it could — “if McCain decides to serve for just one term, Sarah Palin as the economic populist and traditional American values candidates will be very appealing by the time we get to 2012.”
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It is clear that while trying to bond with voters, John McCain and Sarah Palin have not managed to bond with each other. Perhaps we should not be surprised. They barely know one another.
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When McCain appeared on the “Late Show With David Letterman” on Oct. 16, McCain praised Palin but went out of his way to point out how little he knew about her before he chose her as his running mate. “I didn’t know her real well,” McCain said. “I knew her reputation. I didn’t know her well at all. I didn’t know her well at all.”
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The discomfort between the two can be palpable. Chuck Todd, the NBC News political director, was in the room when Brian Williams interviewed Palin and McCain recently. “There was a tenseness,” Todd said later. “When you see the two of them together, the chemistry is just not there. You do wonder, is John McCain starting to blame her for things? Blaming himself? Is she blaming him?”

Read the rest:
http://news.aol.com/elections/article/is-palin-
preparing-for-a-2012-run/229009?icid=100
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McCain’s Prospects Depend on Telling Truth About Obama

October 15, 2008

By Phillis Schlafly
Townhall and The Washington Times
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The media are piling on against John McCain and some pundits are predicting it’s all over, that Barack Obama has somehow won the election. As the old saying goes, it’s not over until the fat lady sings, and it’s high time for the fat lady to sing about Obama’s scary agenda and the many reasons why it is too risky to elect him president.

We need to hear more about ACORN, the special-interest group that would like to steal this election by registering people who are not eligible to vote, such as registering ghost voters in Nevada under the names of the Dallas Cowboys. Obama’s years of close association with ACORN need to be known to the public.

We should hear more about Obama’s political friend William Ayers, the unrepentant bomber and Ward Churchill-type professor, who has a really scary plan to remake the curriculum of public schools in order to turn kids into radical socialists like himself. Obama helped deliver big bucks to Ayers’ radical education project in Chicago.

Obama has already introduced one bill in the U.S. Senate called “Positive Behavior for Effective Schools Act,” which would implement Ayers’ social-outcome notions, and another to teach kindergartners Al Gore’s propaganda about climate change. Voters should be reminded that Obama has called for making “sure your child can speak Spanish.”

We need to have further explanations….

Read the rest:
 http://townhall.com/Columnists/PhyllisSchlafly/2008/
10/14/mccains_prospects_depend_on_telling_truth_about_obama

In Final Debate, Can McCain Rattle an Imperturbable Foe?

October 15, 2008

By Mark Halperin
Time Magazine

Barack Obama is nearly impossible to rattle. His aides and friends are fond of pointing out that his emotional highs are not too high and his lows are never particularly low. It is Obama’s almost preternatural calm that will be John McCain‘s main obstacle at Wednesday night’s final presidential debate in Hempstead, NY.

Workers prepare the stage at the site of the third and final ... 
Above: Workers prepare the stage at the site of the third and final presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, October 14, 2008.(Jim Bourg/Reuters)

With less than three weeks to go before Election Day, the Republican presidential nominee faces a daunting overall task. He is so far behind in the national polls and in most key individual states that it is difficult to assemble a single combination of Electoral College votes to get him to the necessary 270. Despite Monday’s unprecedented stock market rebound and Tuesday’s campaign announcement introducing a new McCain economic policy proposal, voters largely continue to blame the Republicans for the financial crisis and the gloomy mood of an unstable nation. At the same time, the impact of Obama’s massive fundraising advantage has hit full force, flooding battleground states with television ads, direct mail, and well-paid armies of local organizers. As Obama’s lead has held (and even grown in some polls) pundits and political strategists in both parties have begun to assertively predict an easy Obama win, possibly producing a self-fulfilling wave.

 

Under these challenging circumstances, and with a vast audience of voters tuning in, McCain will enter the debate hall for his last chance to shake up the race…

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/time/20081015/u
s_time/infinaldebatecanmccainrattleanim
perturbablefoe;_ylt=Ai4b_ANW8OMUagxhTRNiVd2s0NUE

Gallup: Obama Wins on the Economy, McCain on Terrorism

October 14, 2008
by Lydia Saad
Gallup

PRINCETON, NJ — Barack Obama enjoys a solid advantage over John McCain — 53% to 39% — in U.S. public perceptions of which of the two candidates would better handle the economy as president.

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Obama’s current 14-point lead on the economy is better than the 3-point edge he held right after the Republican National Convention in early September (48% to 45%), but is not quite as great as his 19-point margin after the Democratic convention in late August. At that time, 55% preferred him on the issue, compared to 36% choosing McCain.

According to the new USA Today/Gallup poll, conducted Oct. 10-12, most Republicans and Democrats consider their own party’s candidate to be more capable of handling the economy than his opponent. The main problem, electorally, for McCain is that a majority of political independents favor Obama on the issue, while only 32% name McCain.

Read the rest:
http://www.gallup.com/poll/111130/Obama-Wins-Economy-McCain-Terrorism.aspx

Leading Conservative Voice Calls on McCain to Fire the Campaign Team

October 13, 2008

NBC’s Tom Brokaw makes the same observation of Monday’s TODAY show: the Mccain campaign is failing….

By Bill Kristol
The New York Times

It’s time for John McCain to fire his campaign.

He has nothing to lose. His campaign is totally overmatched by Obama’s. The Obama team is well organized, flush with resources, and the candidate and the campaign are in sync. The McCain campaign, once merely problematic, is now close to being out-and-out dysfunctional. Its combination of strategic incoherence and operational incompetence has become toxic. If the race continues over the next three weeks to be a conventional one, McCain is doomed.

Above: William Kristol

He may be anyway. Bush is unpopular. The media is hostile. The financial meltdown has made things tougher. Maybe the situation is hopeless — and if it is, then nothing McCain or his campaign does matters.

But I’m not convinced by such claims of inevitability. McCain isn’t Bush. The media isn’t all-powerful. And the economic crisis still presents an opportunity to show leadership.

The 2008 campaign is now about something very big — both our future prosperity and our national security. Yet the McCain campaign has become smaller.

What McCain needs to do is junk the whole thing and start over. Shut down the rapid responses, end the frantic e-mails, bench the spinning surrogates, stop putting up new TV and Internet ads every minute. In fact, pull all the ads — they’re doing no good anyway. Use that money for televised town halls and half-hour addresses in prime time.

And let McCain go back to what he’s been good at in the past — running as a cheerful, open and accessible candidate. Palin should follow suit. The two of them are attractive and competent politicians. They’re happy warriors and good campaigners. Set them free.

Provide total media accessibility on their campaign planes and buses. Kick most of the aides off and send them out to swing states to work for the state coordinators on getting voters to the polls. Keep just a minimal staff to help organize the press conferences McCain and Palin should have at every stop and the TV interviews they should do at every location. Do town halls, do the Sunday TV shows, do talk radio — and invite Obama and Biden to join them in some of these venues, on the ground that more joint appearances might restore civility and substance to the contest.

Read the rest:
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/13
/opinion/13kristol.html?_r=1&oref=slogin