Archive for the ‘PAC-3’ Category

Missile Defense: Patriot PAC-3 Missile Test Success With Key Ally

October 18, 2008

The Engineer Online

The German Air Force, with support from Lockheed Martin and the US Army, has conducted the second international PAC-3 Missile test at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico.

 Patriot System 2.jpg

 Above: Patriot system of the German Luftwaffe

The test marked the first time a German Patriot launcher with Configuration-3 upgrades had fired a Patriot Advanced Capability (PAC-3) Missile. Upgrades include the PAC-3 Missile Segment launcher, the Fire Solution Computer and the Enhanced Launcher Electronics System (ELES).

The Patriot air defence system is a long-range, high to medium altitude missile system and Lockheed Martin is the prime contractor on the PAC-3 Missile Segment upgrade. The PAC-3 Missile will increase the Patriot’s firepower from an output of four to 16.

Lieutenant colonel Anthony Brown, PAC-3 product manager, said: ‘The successful flight test marks another significant milestone for both the Program Executive Office, Missiles and Space and our allies. We continue to build on the legacy of this superb weapon system as a key element for the free world’s defence.’

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Tokyo missile defense now complete

March 30, 2008
By MARI YAMAGUCHI, Associated Press Writer

TOKYO – Japan installed the final piece of a missile defense system for Tokyo on Saturday, a day after North Korea test-fired a barrage of missiles.

A Japanese soldier stands guard as the Patriot Advanced Capability-3 ...
Japanese soldier stands guard as the Patriot Advanced Capability-3 (PAC-3) surface-to-air interceptors arrive at the Iruma airforce base in suburban Toyo. Japan completed deploying a ballistic missile defence system in the Tokyo area, a day after North Korea reportedly fired short-range missiles off its west coast, news reports said.(AFP/JIJI PRESS)

Air Self-Defense Forces personnel set up a land-based Patriot Advanced Capability-3 missile intercepter system at the Kasumigaura base in Ibaraki prefecture (state), just northeast of Tokyo, regional defense official Keisuke Tanaka said.

It is the last of four PAC-3 sets deployed around Tokyo to protect the capital region, Tanaka said. The system at the Kasumigaura base, 47 miles northeast of Tokyo, includes five launchers, a special vehicle equipped with radar and another that serves as a control station, he said.

PAC-3 systems were previously installed at three other bases near Tokyo, including Japan’s largest naval base in Yokosuka, the homeport of the U.S. Seventh Fleet.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080329/ap_on_re_as/
japan_missile_defense_1

Japan Ground Self-Defense Force personnel stand at attention ...
Japan Ground Self-Defense Force personnel stand at attention during the Central Readiness Force 1st Helicopter Unit formation ceremony in Kisarazu, east of Tokyo, Japan, Saturday, March 29, 2008.(AP Photo/Itsuo Inouye)

Bush, Polish PM agree on missile defense

March 11, 2008
WASHINGTON (AP) — Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk said President Bush has removed key stumbling blocks in negotiations to allow U.S. missile defense interceptors on Polish soil.

Poland's Prime Minister Donald Tusk answers questions about ...
Poland’s Prime Minister Donald Tusk answers questions about allowing U.S. missile defense interceptors to be based on Polish soil, Monday, March 10, 2008, during and interview with The Associated Press in Washington, following his meeting with President Bush. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Negotiations had been stalled because of Poland’s demand for help in upgrading its military in exchange for allowing the interceptors. U.S. negotiators wanted to deal with the Polish demands separately and leave promises vague.

But Tusk said that Bush agreed during their meeting Monday that the missile defense program and the U.S.-aided modernization of the Polish military would be considered all in “one package.”

“The words of President Bush were very convincing,” he told The Associated Press through an interpreter after leaving the White House. “This is a politician, who is controversial for some but in my opinion is very trustworthy. I believe that is extremely important in the world of politics.”
A ballistic missile streaks across the sky during a test for ... 
A ballistic missile streaks across the sky during a test for the US missile defense program in 2001.(AFP/File/Mike Nelson)

Bush, in a joint appearance with Tusk at the White House, said he had assured the prime minister that the United States would develop a concrete plan for helping Poland modernize its military “before my watch is over.”

The U.S. missile defense plans have become one of the thorniest issues in U.S.-Russian relations. Russia opposes the U.S. plan to build part of its global missile defense system so close to Russian borders, arguing that it would undermine the Russian deterrent. The United States says the system is aimed at countering a threat from Iran or North Korea and would be impotent against Russia’s massive arsenal.

The Polish government argues that the military upgrade is necessary because Russia has threatened to target Poland with nuclear missiles if it should allow the interceptors.

The White House denied the suggestion that the military help is a reward for Polish agreement on the interceptors or that it is needed because of a Russian threat to Poland.

“It is certainly not a quid pro quo,” White House press secretary Dana Perino said. “Who is suggesting that Russia is going to attack anybody?”

When told that it is Polish officials who have said this, Perino said that it wasn’t part of the discussions Monday between Tusk and Bush.

Tusk said that the United States had backed down from an insistence that it would need six months to consider how it could help Poland upgrade its military. Tusk said that U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice told him Monday that the period could be reduced to three months.

Following the meeting between the two leaders at the White House, Bush said the United States recognizes the need for Polish forces to be modernized, and “we’re responding.”

“There is a commitment to a system that respects Poland’s sovereignty and that will ensure that the people of Poland will not be subjected to any undue security risks,” Bush said. “This is the kind of issue that all kinds of rumors and worries can grow out of and we just want to assure people that it’s necessary and at the same time there will be this modernization effort that will take place.”

Neither leader talked specifics. Bush said “obviously there’s a lot of work to do” and that experts are working through the details to make sure that “the people of Poland are comfortable with the idea.”

The United States opened the negotiations last year with the government of previous Polish Prime Minister Jaroslaw Kaczynski, who strongly supported the U.S. proposal. Tusk’s government has sought more in return.

Polish officials have said they are looking for help to acquire air defenses against short- to medium-range missiles. Negotiators have asked for Patriot 3 or THAAD missiles and have identified 17 areas of the Polish military that the United States could help modernize. Interceptors for the planned U.S. shield are for protection against long-range missiles.

Japan: “Significant” Missile Defense Success

December 18, 2007

HONOLULU (AP) – Japan is now the first U.S. ally to shoot down a mid-range ballistic missile in a test from a ship at sea. Japan’s top government spokesman says this is very significant for Japanese national security. He says the government plans to continue bolstering its missile defense systems by installing necessary equipment and conducting tests. Tokyo has invested heavily in missile defense since North Korea test-fired a long-range missile over northern Japan nearly 10 years ago. It has installed missile tracking technology on several navy ships and has plans to equip three additional vessels with interceptors. The U.S. Missile Defense Agency calls the test “a major milestone” in U.S.-Japanese relations.
In this photo provided by Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, ... 
In this photo provided by Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, a Standard Missile 3 (SM-3) is launched from the Japanese Aegis Destroyer JS Kongo in the warter off Kauai, Hawaii, Monday, Dec. 17, 2007. The Japanese military became the first U.S. ally to shoot down a mid-range ballistic missile in space, about 100 miles above the Pacific Ocean, fired from the Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai, run by the U.S. Navy, with the interceptor fired from the ship at sea in a test Monday.
(AP Photo/Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, HO)

Japan shoots down test missile in space – defense minister

December 18, 2007

TOKYO (Thomson Financial) – Japan said Tuesday it had shot down a ballistic missile in space high above the Pacific Ocean as part of joint efforts with the United States to erect a shield against a possible attack from North Korea.Japan tested the US-developed Standard Missile 3 (SM-3) interceptor from a warship in waters off Hawaii, becoming the first US ally to intercept a target using the system.

Defense Minister Shigeru Ishiba described the successful test as “extremely significant.” “We will continue to strive to increase the system’s credibility,” he told reporters, insisting the missile shield was worth the high cost.

“We can’t talk about how much money should be spent when human lives are at stake.” Japan plans to spend a total of 127 billion yen over the four years to March 2008 on missile defense using the US-developed Aegis combat system, according to the defense ministry.

The naval destroyer Kongou launched the SM-3 which, at 7.12 am Japan time (2212 GMT Monday), intercepted the missile fired from onshore earlier, the navy said in a statement.

Officials said the interception was made around 100 miles (160 kilometers) above the Pacific. Japan plans to install the missile shield on four Aegis-equipped destroyers by March 2011, including the Kongou.

If the SM-3 system fails to intercept its target in space, the second stage of the shield uses ground-based Patriot Advanced Capability 3 (PAC-3) missile interceptors to try to shoot it down.

Japan introduced its first PAC-3 missile launcher at the Iruma air force base north of Tokyo in March, one year ahead of schedule, amid tense relations with North Korea which tested a nuclear device for the first time in October last year.

Japanese authorities aim to increase the number of locations equipped with the PAC-3 system to 14 by March 2011.

Japan Set to Test Sea-Based Missile Defense System

October 16, 2007

The Asahi Shimbun
October 16, 2007

The Defense Ministry will conduct a trial exercise with newly developed ballistic missile defense (BMD) technology in December ahead of plans the following month to deploy the nation’s first sea-based system to defend against such strikes.

Ministry officials said the guided missile destroyer Kongo will be based in waters off Hawaii in mid-December for the exercise to be conducted in cooperation with the U.S. Navy to intercept a ballistic missile using the advanced Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) system.

Related:
Russia: Japan-U.S. Missile Defense “Of Concern”

Read the rest:
http://www.asahi.com/english/Herald-asahi/TKY200710150314.html