Archive for the ‘one child’ Category

Obama Will Once Again Make America A Fully Supporting Abortion Nation

November 17, 2008

Among a slew of executive orders Barack Obama is said to be drafting, observers believe one may lift a ban on US funding for overseas family planning groups that even dare mention abortion.

by Karin Zeitvogel, AFP

Among a slew of executive orders Barack Obama, pictured in October ... 
Among a slew of executive orders Barack Obama, pictured in October 2008, is said to be drafting, observers believe one may lift a ban on US funding for overseas family planning groups that even dare mention abortion.(AFP/File/Emmanuel Dunand)

“I think there’s a very good likelihood that he will lift the ‘global gag rule,'” said Steven Mosher, head of the pro-life, non-profit Population Research Institute.

“The previous Democratic president Bill Clinton just a couple of days after being sworn in signed a whole series of executive orders which undid the policies of the previous two administrations,” Mosher said.

First introduced by Republican president Ronald Reagan in 1984, the “global gag rule” cuts off US funding to overseas family planning clinics which provide any abortion services whatsoever, from the operation itself to counselling, referrals or post-abortion services.

When President George W. Bush came into office in 2000, he immediately reversed Clinton’s orders once again freezing funds to many family planning groups.

US funds to the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) have been blocked since 2002, with the State Department saying the UN agency supports China’s one-child policy, which is says amounts to coercive abortion.

A baby takes a drink as he waits outside a children's hospital ... 
A baby takes a drink as he waits outside a children’s hospital in Beijing in late September. China has a policy allowing parents to have only one child.  Some say this is coercive birth control and leads to forced abortions. AFP/File/Peter Parks

“The Bush administration has said the UNFPA supports coercive birth control methods and that’s why they’re blocking money to it,” said Tait Sye, a spokesman for the Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA).

“The problem is that UNFPA money goes towards things like family planning and contraception, too,” vital services in developing countries, he added.

A World Bank report published in July said women in developing countries, where access to contraception is poor, often turn to abortion as a means of birth control.

Related:
Catholic Bishops Will Challenge Obama, Lawmakers, Nation on Abortion

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081116/hl_afp/uspolitics
obamaabortionhealth;_ylt=AjVVUaewlZBn_Chckuz_8h6s0NUE

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China one-child policy to stay in place

March 10, 2008
BY TINI TRAN, Associated Press Writer 

BEIJING – China will not consider changing its one-child policy for at least a decade for fear that a population surge could spark social and economic instability, the nation’s top family planning official said in an interview published Monday.

Zhang Weiqing of the State Population and Family Planning Commission told the official China Daily newspaper that the one-child rule should be maintained for now.

“Given such a large population base, there would be major fluctuations in population growth if we abandoned the one-child rule now,” he was quoted as saying. “It would cause serious problems and add extra pressure on social and economic development.”

Any change in the policy would be considered only after the end of the country’s next birth peak in 10 years….

China: Officials Violating ‘One-Child’ Policy Forced Out

January 8, 2008

By Maureen Fan
Washington Post Foreign Service
January 8, 2008; Page A16

BEIJING, Jan. 7 — Officials in Hubei province have expelled 500 people from the Communist Party for violating China’s “one-child” family planning policy, state media reports said Monday.

Of the 93,084 people who had more children than allowed last year, 1,678 were officials or party members, the New China News Agency reported. Among the violators were seven national or local legislators and political advisers, all of whom were stripped of their political status. Another 395 offenders lost their jobs.

China’s family planning officials, worried about a baby boom that could further strain the country’s resources, have been trying to crack down on parents who have more children than they are permitted under the law.

Under the current rules, city residents are limited to one child, while rural residents may have two children. In addition, parents who themselves are only children and members of ethnic minorities are granted exceptions.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/01/07/AR2008010701062.html

No U.N. Funding for China

September 8, 2007

WASHINGTON (AP) – For the sixth consecutive year, the Bush administration has decided to withhold funding from the U.N. Population Fund, saying the agency contributes to China‘s “coercive abortion” program.

The administration decision was disclosed in a letter from Deputy Secretary of State John Negroponte sent to lawmakers on Thursday, according to a copy of the document seen Friday. Congress had appropriated $34 million for the program, but gave President Bush the authority to decline to spend the money.

China has denied using any coercive measures in its population control ….

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070907
/ap_on_go_pr_wh/us_un_population_fund_1

 UN Flag, adopted December 7, 1946.

UN Flag, adopted December 7, 1946.

What Does Beijing’s Central Government Consider a “Threat”?

August 6, 2007

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
First Published July 29, 2007
Updated August 6, 2007

In China, the people have no right of assembly or to free speech. The media is severely limited and the central government would prefer that the only voice of the media in China came from the state agency: Xinhua.

The government of Beijing is increasingly worried about and sensitive to assemblies of groups and potential for disorder.

No To AIDS Conference

China just today cancelled an HIV/AIDS conference and seminar.

“Authorities informed us that the combination of AIDS, law and foreigners was too sensitive,” Sara Davis, on the organizers of the conference told Reuters.

The nations invited, and presumably these were the nations China objected to, were: South Africa, India, the United States, Canada and Thailand.

Catholic Priests Detained

In another case of China’s paranoia, several Catholic priests were detained this weekend. Their crime? China’s 12 million Catholics share the same basic religious beliefs but are politically divided between “above-ground” churches approved by the ruling Communist Party and “underground” churches that reject government ties. The priests detained are said to be from the “underground church.”

A picture begins to emerge of a communist Chinese government that does not permit gatherings of just a handful of people unless the government has approved both the topic of discussion and the participants.

Since the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown, China has been at least extremely sensitive and some might say paranoid about groups, assembly and free speech.

Any hint of not following Beijing to the letter is termed “social instability.”


Communist Vietnam’s proven method
of silencing a prisoner.  Father Ly just
before he was removed from court.  He
had no representation at trial

Illegal Government Land Grabbing

Government “appropriation” (or rather, misappropriation) of peasant farms and other lands is the largest root source of assemblies, riots, other forms of civil unrest and “social instability.”

“This is the foremost issue in rural areas and probably the most contentious issue leading to social unrest in China today,” Nicholas Bequelin, a Hong Kong-based China researcher with Human Rights Watch said.

The issue of the illegal seizure of land by thge government is also the single most important reason for protests in Vietnam.

There were 130,000 cases of illegal land grabs last year in China, an increase of 17.3 percent from 2005, the land ministry said in March.

Mr. Bequelin said these 130,000 are just the reported cases. He believes there may be 100,000 other cases or more. He noted past official estimates that 50-60 percent of all land deals in China were illegal, rising to 90 percent in many places.

“The crux of the issue is that governments at all levels plunder the land resources, the commoners see little if any of the money and violators get off scot-free,” said Hou Guoyan, a retired professor from the China University of Political Science and Law.

Beijing has also issued a series of regulations aimed at increasing scrutiny, but experts say the central government does not have enough power to enforce the law in the provinces.

“The (central) government is at a loss to solve the problem,” Hou said.

This is the “social instability” Beijing fears.

Enforcing ‘State Policy’

The central government is also having a great deal of trouble enforcing many other of its own communist state policies.

Earlier this year, in Bobai county in the region of Guangxi, thousands of villagers rioted, burning cars and clashing with police, after being fined for breaching the one-child policy.

China allows couples to only bring into the world one child. Villagers in Bobai were violating this rule. When police cracked down to enforce the law, violence erupted.

Central Beijing was caught off guard and proved itself completely incapable of an appropriate response.

Then, on August 5, 2007, China’s official Xinhua News Agency reported the nation’s top family planning agency has cracked down on crude and insensitive slogans used by rural authorities to enforce the country’s strict population limits.

Slogans such as ‘Raise fewer babies but more piggies,’ and ‘One more baby means one more tomb,’ have been forbidden and a list of 190 acceptable slogans issued by the National Population and Family Planning Commission, the official Xinhua News Agency reported.

After the “One Child Riot,” Beijing authorities found out about the ugly and demeaning slogans from rioters.  Beijing bureaucrats admitted they had no idea how the “One Child Policy” was being administered or policed in the countryside.

Other incidents of people in the countryside ignoring Beijing are common.

Pollution Regulations IgnoredAfter China pledged to contain and even reduce its huge pollution problem and its contributions to greenhouse gases, the people in the countryside were disturbed. When the new environmental requirements trickled down to the provinces and the countryside, they were and are being ignored.

Local governments in China are continuing to invest in dirty, resource-intense industries, jeopardizing Beijing’s goals of saving energy and cutting pollution. Some regions are encouraging steel, cement and other heavy industries to boost economic growth despite demands from Beijing to rein in those sectors, the China Daily newspaper reported.

When it first became apparent that local governments were ignoring Beijing on pollution issues, Beijing threatened local communist leaders. Their promotions were tied to environments goals. But this scheme was an utter failure. Fearing a total revolt of local communist officials, Beijing rescinded the edict on July 21, 2007.
Photo

In other cases of a disconnect between Beijing and the countryside, good intentions can go horribly wrong.

In 2005, Chinese farmers, acting with the approval and encouragement of government officials, tried to suppress major bird flu outbreaks among chickens with an antiviral drug meant for humans, animal health experts said. International researchers concluded that this is why the drug will no longer protect people in case of a worldwide bird flu epidemic.

Summer Olympics 2008

China is already preparing to “manage and control” crowds, assembly and protests at next summer’s Beijing Olympics. The gathering of information on foreigners who might mount protests and spoil the nation’s moment in the spotlight has already commenced. The central Beijing government is already preparing lists of potentially troublesome foreign organizations, looking beyond the human rights groups long critical of Beijing.

Among those targeted as “potential protest and assembly groups”? American Evangelical Christians.

China watchers we have been in contact with cited this as another example of Beijing’s paranoia.

But Beijing defends its actions as necessary for the safety of all involved in the Olympics, even Americans.

“Demonstrations of all kinds are a concern, including anti-American demonstrations,” said the consultant, who works for Beijing’s Olympic organizers and asked not to be identified because he was not authorized to talk to the media.

The government, he said, is “trying to find out what kinds of NGOs will come. … What are their plans?”

While foreign governments often monitor potentially disruptive groups ahead of big events, Beijing this time is ranging farther afield, targeting groups whose activities would be considered legal in most countries.
Photo

Local Communist Authorities Threatened

During the first week of July 2007, China ordered local authorities to address the root causes of rising public discontent, according to state media sources. China watchers consider this yet another sign of growing concern over social stability from Beijing.

Local officials have been told they will be denied promotions unless they minimize social unrest in their areas, Xinhua news agency quoted a top Community Party official as saying.

In summary, the communist government in Beijing is insisting on total control of all its 1.3 billion people and its vast countryside. But in many cases, China’s central government in Beijing is being resisted or ignored.

Should these tendencies persists, it certainly means additional violence could be possible inside China.
Beijing is rushing to make its air clean for the 2008 Olympics, but experts say it will be impossible for the site to be totally safe for athletes at the global sporting event.

China: So Big, So Powerful, So Disorganized, So Corrupt

China Plans Happy Olympics But A Few “Small” Problems Remain

China softens its tough family-planning slogans

August 5, 2007

(AP) August 5, 2007 — China’s top family planning agency has cracked down on crude and insensitive slogans used by rural authorities to enforce the country’s strict population limits, state media said Sunday.Slogans such as ‘Raise fewer babies but more piggies,’ and ‘One more baby means one more tomb,’ have been forbidden and a list of 190 acceptable slogans issued by the National Population and Family Planning Commission, the official Xinhua News Agency reported.

China’s 28-year-old family planning policy limits most urban couples to just one child and allows some families in the countryside to have a second child if their first is a girl. Critics say it has led to forced abortions, sterilizations and a dangerously imbalanced sex ratio ….

Read the rest:
http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2007/08/05/asia/AS-GEN-China-One-Child-Policy.php

Related:
Corruption in China: The anger boils over

Corruption in China: The anger boils over

August 5, 2007

By Carl Minzner
International Herald Tribune
May 29, 2007 

For the past two months, local officials in the southwestern Chinese province of Guangxi have pursued a harsh campaign aimed at enforcing China’s population planning laws.

In order to meet targets for allowable births, they forced pregnant women to have abortions. They threatened to demolish homes to make residents cough up fines demanded for excess children.

This month citizen anger boiled over…

The vicious nature of the Guangxi enforcement campaign is all the more striking because it directly conflicts with the orders of China’s top leaders.

Read the Rest:
http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/05/29/opinion/
edminzer.php

What Does Beijing’s Communist Central Government Consider a “Threat”?

July 29, 2007

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
July 29, 2007

In China, the people have no right of assembly or to free speech. The media is severely limited and the central government would prefer that the only voice of the media in China came from the state agency: Xinhua.

The government of Beijing is increasingly worried about and sensitive to assemblies of groups and potential for disorder.

No To AIDS Conference

China just today cancelled an HIV/AIDS conference and seminar.

“Authorities informed us that the combination of AIDS, law and foreigners was too sensitive,” Sara Davis, on the organizers of the conference told Reuters.

The nations invited, and presumably these were the nations China objected to, were: South Africa, India, the United States, Canada and Thailand.

Catholic Priests Detained

In another case of China’s paranoia, several Catholic priests were detained this weekend. Their crime? China’s 12 million Catholics share the same basic religious beliefs but are politically divided between “above-ground” churches approved by the ruling Communist Party and “underground” churches that reject government ties. The priests detained are said to be from the “underground church.”

A picture begins to emerge of a communist Chinese government that does not permit gatherings of just a handful of people unless the government has approved both the topic of discussion and the participants.

Since the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown, China has been at least extremely sensitive and some might say paranoid about groups, assembly and free speech.

Any hint of not following Beijing to the letter is termed “social instability.”


Communist Vietnam’s proven method
of silencing a prisoner.  Father Ly just
before he was removed from court.  He
had no representation at trial

Illegal Government Land Grabbing

Government “appropriation” (or rather, misappropriation) of peasant farms and other lands is the largest root source of assemblies, riots, other forms of civil unrest and “social instability.”

“This is the foremost issue in rural areas and probably the most contentious issue leading to social unrest in China today,” Nicholas Bequelin, a Hong Kong-based China researcher with Human Rights Watch said.

The issue of the illegal seizure of land by thge government is also the single most important reason for protests in Vietnam.

There were 130,000 cases of illegal land grabs last year in China, an increase of 17.3 percent from 2005, the land ministry said in March.

Mr. Bequelin said these 130,000 are just the reported cases. He believes there may be 100,000 other cases or more. He noted past official estimates that 50-60 percent of all land deals in China were illegal, rising to 90 percent in many places.

“The crux of the issue is that governments at all levels plunder the land resources, the commoners see little if any of the money and violators get off scot-free,” said Hou Guoyan, a retired professor from the China University of Political Science and Law.

Beijing has also issued a series of regulations aimed at increasing scrutiny, but experts say the central government does not have enough power to enforce the law in the provinces.

“The (central) government is at a loss to solve the problem,” Hou said.

This is the “social instability” Beijing fears.

Enforcing ‘State Policy’

The central government is also having a great deal of trouble enforcing many other of its own communist state policies.

Earlier this year, in Bobai county in the region of Guangxi, thousands of villagers rioted, burning cars and clashing with police, after being fined for breaching the one-child policy.

China allows couples to only bring into the world one child. Villagers in Bobai were violating this rule. When police cracked down to enforce the law, violence erupted.

Central Beijing was caught off guard and proved itself completely incapable of an appropriate response.

Other incidents of people in the countryside ignoring Beijing are common.

Pollution Regulations Ignored

After China pledged to contain and even reduce its huge pollution problem and its contributions to greenhouse gases, the people in the countryside were disturbed. When the new environmental requirements trickled down to the provinces and the countryside, they were and are being ignored.Local governments in China are continuing to invest in dirty, resource-intense industries, jeopardizing Beijing’s goals of saving energy and cutting pollution. Some regions are encouraging steel, cement and other heavy industries to boost economic growth despite demands from Beijing to rein in those sectors, the China Daily newspaper reported.

When it first became apparent that local governments were ignoring Beijing on pollution issues, Beijing threatened local communist leaders. Their promotions were tied to environments goals.

But this scheme was an utter failure. Fearing a total revolt of local communist officials, Beijing rescinded the edict on July 21, 2007.
Photo

Summer Olympics 2008

China is already preparing to “manage and control” crowds, assembly and protests at next summer’s Beijing Olympics. The gathering of information on foreigners who might mount protests and spoil the nation’s moment in the spotlight has already commenced. The central Beijing government is already preparing lists of potentially troublesome foreign organizations, looking beyond the human rights groups long critical of Beijing.

Among those targeted as “potential protest and assembly groups”? American Evangelical Christians.

China watchers we have been in contact with cited this as another example of Beijing’s paranoia.

But Beijing defends its actions as necessary for the safety of all involved in the Olympics, even Americans.

“Demonstrations of all kinds are a concern, including anti-American demonstrations,” said the consultant, who works for Beijing’s Olympic organizers and asked not to be identified because he was not authorized to talk to the media.

The government, he said, is “trying to find out what kinds of NGOs will come. … What are their plans?”

While foreign governments often monitor potentially disruptive groups ahead of big events, Beijing this time is ranging farther afield, targeting groups whose activities would be considered legal in most countries.
Photo

Local Communist Authorities Threatened

During the first week of July 2007, China ordered local authorities to address the root causes of rising public discontent, according to state media sources. China watchers consider this yet another sign of growing concern over social stability from Beijing.

Local officials have been told they will be denied promotions unless they minimize social unrest in their areas, Xinhua news agency quoted a top Community Party official as saying.

In summary, the communist government in Beijing is insisting on total control of all its 1.3 billion people and its vast countryside. But in many cases, China’s central government in Beijing is being resisted or ignored.

Should these tendencies persists, it certainly means additional violence could be possible inside China.
Beijing is rushing to make its air clean for the 2008 Olympics, but experts say it will be impossible for the site to be totally safe for athletes at the global sporting event.

China jails two men for birth-control riots

July 23, 2007

BEIJING (Reuters) – A court in southwest China has jailed two men who joined in violent mass protests against harsh family planning measures in May, finding them guilty of falsifying an official document, state media said on Monday.

Thousands of villagers rioted in several towns in Bobai county in the region of Guangxi from May 17-20, ransacking government buildings, burning cars and clashing with police, after being fined for breaching the one-child policy.

Read it all:
http://www.reuters.com/article/inDepthNews/idUSPEK22690320070723