Archive for the ‘Negroponte’ Category

Secretary Negroponte: Secure The Release of At Least One Jailed In Vietnam

January 13, 2008

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
January 13, 2008

In the endless, general discussions of international diplomacy, sometimes, it seems, absolutely nothing is accomplished.

For that reason, we urge U.S. Deputy Secretary of State John Negroponte, who travels to Vietnam this week, to make a commitment to free Le Thi Cong Nhan, a young Ho Chi Minh City attorney in a communist Vietnam jail.

Le Thi Cong Nhan in court in Hanoi on 11 May 2007

Ms Nhan is one of the latest activists to be sent to prison bt communist Vietnam.
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In early November, 2006, just before President George W. Bush and other heads of state from around the globe assembled in Hanoi for the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit (APEC), Ms Nhan’s apartment was surrounded by communist Vietnam police. Her phones and internet were cut off. She was told she was not allowed to leave her home.

Ms Nhan, she was told, had spoken out against human rights abuses in Vietnam, one crime; and then she used the internet to spread her views, her second crime in Vietnam.

The BBC reported on 16 November 2006, “The move seems to be part of a general attempt to prevent anyone from disrupting the summit.”
Nguyễn Minh Triết and First Lady Trần Thị Kim Chi meet with George W. Bush and Laura Bush at the President's Palace, November 2006.

Nguyễn Minh Triết and First Lady Trần Thị Kim Chi meet with George W. Bush and Laura Bush at the President’s Palace, Hanoi, November 2006, during the APEC summit.
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The BBC also reported, “Miss Cong Nhan’s mother was told by police that her daughter cannot leave her apartment or talk to foreigners until … after the Apec summit has finished.”

Another factor in Ms Nhan house arrest may have been this: she was scheduled to defend a British woman of Vietnamese origin potentially facing the death penalty for drug smuggling.

Despite communist Vietnam’s verbal assurances that it stands for a free and fair judicial system, defense attorneys who take positions contrary to the state’s are often in for at least ridicule and often harassed or imprisoned.

Soon after Vietnam was admitted to the World Trade Organization (WTO), on 6 March, 2007, Ms Nhan was arrested and accused of collaborating with overseas pro-democracy advocates and using the internet to spread her views.

On May 10, Ms. Nhan was tried and found guilty of “spreading propaganda intended to undermine Vietnam’s Communist government.”

About a month later the President of Vietnam, Nguyễn Minh Triết, visited with President Bush in the White House.

At their White House meeting on June 22, 2007, President Bush told Mr. Triết , “In order for relations to grow deeper, it’s important for our friends to have a strong commitment to human rights and freedom and democracy.”

Mr. Triết has shown little or no inkling of a reaction to the President of the United States’ urgings.

Left, Presidents Triết and Bush in the White House.
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Ms Nhan was sentenced to four years in prison by the Hanoi People’s Court.  She was also ordered to serve several years’ house arrest after the completion of her prison sentence.

So, we ask Mr. Negroponte, as the second most senior full-time U.S. diplomat, to commit to seek the immediate freedom of Ms Nhan.  She is a political prisoner among many others. 

If the communist government of Vietnam is serious about its pledges made before and during the APEC summit in 2006, if communist Vietnam is serious about honoring the pledges it made to gain entry into the WTO and if President Triết is serious about his pledges to President Bush when the two met in Washington D.C. in June, 2007, then the release of Ms Nhan would be a delightful, if symbolic, signal that Vietnam truly intends to become a member of the civilized community of nations.

Just today, January 13, 2008, the President of the United States said during his address in Abu Dhabi, “You cannot expect people to believe in the promise of a better future when they are jailed for peacefully petitioning their government.”

The president continued, “And you cannot stand up a modern, confident nation when you do not allow people to voice their legitimate criticisms.”

Words mean nothing unless Vietnam and the United States act upon their words — and their beliefs.

Related:

Vietnam Striving to be Good WTO Participant

China, Vietnam: Global Issues

We encourage all to contact their elected representatives on this and all human rights issues.

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archives/2008/1/12/3462440.html

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China, Vietnam: Global Issues

January 11, 2008

To U.S. Deputy Secretary of State John Negroponte;

Dear Sir;

The Public Affairs section of your U.S. State Department announced yesterday that you would travel to China and Vietnam January 16-20, 2008.

John Negroponte
John Negroponte

We know you are well aware of the many issues of interest to the United States and the greater global community with regard to China and Vietnam but we fear that sometimes the niceties of diplomatic discourse mutes the message to China and Vietnam.

Here are the top issues we urge you to consider raising in Beijing and Hanoi:

Human Rights: Both China and Vietnam are on the list of nations who routinely violate human rights. The U.S. Department of state and the United Nations have documented many abuses yet the consequences for the communist governments of China and Vietnam have been inconsequential. China agreed to alleviate human rights abuses during its selection to host the Summer Olympic games later this year. Vietnam said it would address human rights more directly as it was seeking acceptance to the World Trade Organization (WTO). Most human rights organizations say those promises from China and Vietnam turned out to be lies – and the world community has largely stood by idly.

Darfur: China is Sudan’s number one trading partner; yet China continues to largely look the other way at the abuses and possibly even genocide in Darfur. In the last few days, two news items highlighted this problem. First, U.N. peacekeeping chief Jean-Marie Guéhenno told the Security Council on Wednesday that U.N. peacekeeping forces lack the troops and equipment necessary to improve the situation in violence-wracked Darfur and will continue to be ineffective until mid-2008. And, Second, China’s senior diplomat for Sudan and Darfur denied any linkage between the human rights abuses in Darfur and China’s Olympic Games. Liu Guijin, special envoy for Darfur, said China cannot be held responsible for the actions of the government of Sudan. But we wonder if China has exerted its influence in Sudan commensurate with its vast business interests there including oil drilling, infrastructure projects and weapons sales.

Pollution: China and Vietnam are now among the world’s leaders in pollution and global warming. Both nations have extremely high degrees of polluted ground water, much of it caused by over-use of pesticides and fertilizers. We urge the United States to offer ways to ameliorate this problem though training, scientific applications and the use of better methods and chemicals. China’s air pollution is now so severe that Olympic teams are expressing concern for the health of their athletes and nations such as Japan have protested that the air pollution produced in China is now impacting nations around the globe. We urge the United states to continue to raise this issue with Beijing.

Beijing is rushing to make its air clean for the 2008 Olympics, but experts say it will be impossible for the site to be totally safe for athletes at the global sporting event.

Above: A beautiful, sunny morning near Beijing.

Territorial and Resources dispute: China and Vietnam are embroiled in a long-standing dispute over islands and resources in the South China Sea. We urge you to pledge that the United states will participate in resolution of this dispute if asked and certinly the united nations might be able to assist in this matter. The disagreement came to a boil in November and December after China reasserted its claim to the islands. The people of Vietnam reacted so vocally in protests and blogging that China asked the communist government in Vietnam to quell the dissent. This ugly dispute, without resolution, has many possible outcomes: all of which would be harmful to regional peace and stability.
A Vietnamese protestor demonstrates against a Chinese move to exert control over two disputed archipelagos 
China’s actions in the South
China Sea sparked protests
in Vietnam

Dear Sir; we appreciate your efforts dealing with China and Vietnam and offer these suggestions for the future benefit of all mankind.

Peace and Freedom

Related:

Rice’s deputy to visit China, Vietnam

Chinese Envoy Denounces Efforts to Link Darfur Concerns, Beijing Olympics

Darfur peacekeeping set back by 6 months

China blogger beaten to death

Secretary Negroponte: Secure The Release of At Least One Jailed In Vietnam
Photo

Careful wishing on Pakistan

November 23, 2007

Viola Herms Drath
November 23, 2007

Deputy Secretary of State John D. Negroponte flew to Islamabad to read Gen. Pervez Musharraf the riot act: End the state of emergency, restore the democratic process by parliamentary elections in January, shed the uniform — or else.

What to do about Pakistan, a nuclear power in political turmoil over the rise of Islamist extremism and terrorism? After all, the postcolonial power held together by its army has been an indispensable ally in Washington’s worldwide war against militant Islam. But lately, Pakistan’s embattled President Pervez Musharraf seems to be losing his grip in fighting the Taliban, al Qaeda and local terrorists in the country’s crucial lawless northwestern region bordering on troubled Afghanistan.

Evidence that terrorist recruits from Western Europe and the Middle East are trained there and, even more importantly, that NATO’s ….

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071123/COMMENTARY/111230047

Pakistan rejects calls to end emergency

November 18, 2007

By MATTHEW ROSENBERG, Associated Press Writer 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan – Pakistan on Sunday rejected a blunt call from Washington’s No. 2 diplomat for President Gen. Pervez Musharraf to lift emergency rule and free political opponents ahead of elections.

“This is nothing new,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Mohammed Sadiq told The Associated Press. “The U.S. has been saying this for many days. He has said that same thing. He has reiterated it.”

Deputy Secretary of State John Negroponte delivered the message that Musharraf must end emergency rule as soon as possible during a two-hour meeting Saturday with Musharraf and Pakistan’s deputy army commander, Gen. Ashfaq Kayani. The envoy’s visit was seen as a last best chance to ease the latest political turmoil in Pakistan.

 Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071118/ap_on_re_as/
pakistan;_ylt=Ar_6HfkkRsbVIiPHBLagZses0NUE

US envoy: Pakistan must end emergency

November 18, 2007

By MATTHEW ROSENBERG, Associated Press Writer 
November 18, 2007
0900 GMT
 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan – Washington’s No. 2 diplomat delivered a blunt message to Pakistan‘s military ruler, telling him Saturday that emergency rule must be lifted and his opponents freed ahead of elections.

 

But there was no immediate sign that President Gen. Pervez Musharraf would heed that advice, with a presidential aide saying the Pakistani leader insisted that emergency rule would only be lifted once security improves.

Deputy Secretary of State John Negroponte’s visit was seen as a last best chance to ease the latest political turmoil in Pakistan.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071118/ap_on_re_
as/pakistan;_ylt=Au2F9ooRJGwk8XFVlOl8
M96s0NUE

Pakistan’s Musharraf faces US pressure

November 17, 2007

By MATTHEW ROSENBERG, Associated Press Writer  

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan – Pakistan‘s military ruler faced intense U.S. pressure Saturday to end emergency rule and restore democracy, with Washington’s No. 2 diplomat personally delivering what many here see as a sharp warning from a once staunch ally.

Whether President Gen. Pervez Musharraf was ready to listen was the question. He says the two-week long emergency — which has seen opponents jailed, judges purged and independent TV stations muffled — is needed to hold a peaceful vote in the country beset by an increasingly potent Islamic insurgency.

U.S. Deputy Secretary of State John Negroponte’s trip was seen as a last best chance to persuade him and avoid political turmoil in Pakistan, a key front in the war on terror. The diplomat was expected to make his only public comment at a news conference scheduled for early Sunday, just ahead of his departure.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071117/ap_on_re_
as/pakistan_741

Related:

U.S. Secretly Aids Pakistan in Guarding Nuclear Arms

Pakistan rejects calls to end emergency

Prep U.S. Military Option for Pakistan?

Pakistan leader to get U.S. prod

November 17, 2007

By Stephen Graham
November 17, 2007 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) — Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf faces a stern warning from a top American diplomat today: End emergency rule or wreck landmark elections and risk undermining vital U.S. support.

Gen. Musharraf made concessions ahead of Deputy Secretary of State John D. Negroponte’s arrival yesterday, allowing independent TV news back on the air and freeing opposition leaders and a respected U.N. rights specialist.

But he also pushed ahead with plans for parliamentary elections in January, swearing in a caretaker government and defending his record since seizing power in a 1999 coup.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/article/20071117/
FOREIGN/111170032/1001