Archive for the ‘National Football League’ Category

Sean Taylor, 24, Redskin, Dead

November 27, 2007

MIAMI – Washington Redskins safety Sean Taylor died early Tuesday, a day after the Pro Bowl player was shot at home by what police say was an intruder. He was 24.  

Washington Redskins fans stood vigil for Sean Taylor on Monday night at the team’s training complex. Meanwhile, teammates and coaches offered their own prayers for a player that they said had matured beyond the early troubles of his NFL career.

“This is the worst imaginable tragedy,” Redskins owner Daniel Snyder said in a statement. “Our thoughts and prayers are with Sean’s family.”

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The shooting, called a “deliberate attack” by Redskins vice president of football operations Vinny Cerrato was reported to police at 1:46 a.m. Monday by Taylor’s girlfriend. Taylor’s house had been broken into a week earlier.

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Washington Redskins coach Joe Gibbs talks about Redskins star safety Sean Taylor during a news conference, Monday, Nov. 26, 2007 in Ashburn, Va. Taylor was in critical condition Monday after surgery for a gunshot wound to his leg during what police are investigating as a possible armed robbery at his home. (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf)

Taylor, 24, the fifth overall pick of the 2004 draft by the Redskins, was airlifted in critical condition to Miami’s Jackson Memorial Hospital for treatment, police said.The Miami Herald reported that Taylor and other occupants of the house heard intruders at the rear door and that Taylor was shot in the leg, but police said they could not confirm those details.“We’ve yet to determine the circumstances surrounding the shooting,” Miami-Dade Police spokeswoman Kathy Webb said.Miami-Dade police Lt. Nancy Perez, speaking to reporters outside Taylor’s home, said Taylor “was shot in the lower extremities. He was airlifted to Ryder Trauma (center at Jackson Memorial Hospital) in critical condition.”Taylor, a college star with the University of Miami, bought the four-bedroom home in Palmetto Bay, a village just south of Miami, for $900,000 two years ago.Taylor had five interceptions this season but had been sidelined the last two weeks with a leg injury.
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Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder leaves Jackson Memorial Hospital’s Ryder Trauma Center in Miami, Florida, November 26, 2007, after visiting for Washington Redskins football player Sean Taylor who was shot at his home. Taylor, 24, who was the Redskins first pick in the 2004 draft, was airlifted to Miami’s Jackson Memorial Hospital for treatment and is in critical condition, police said. REUTERS/Hans Deryk (UNITED STATES)

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Infamous return: O. J. Again in the News

September 18, 2007

By Phil Taylor
Sports Illustrated.com
September 18, 2007

It’s as if O.J. Simpson was afraid that Michael Vick or Adam “Pacman” Jones was a threat to his title of America’s Most Reviled Sports Figure, so he decided to get himself back in the news and remind us that when it comes to athletes who have ruined their once-good names, Simpson is still the undisputed heavyweight champion.

Read the rest:
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/writers/phil_taylor/09/17/
simpson/index.html?section=si_latest

Related:
Early Odds in Vegas: Don’t Bet on Juice Futures

Early Odds in Vegas: Don’t Bet on Juice Futures

September 18, 2007

“Canned Juice.” “O.J. In Tight Squeeze Again.” “Getting Away With Murder (But Not Theft).” “Fresh Squeezed Juice.” “What Happens in Vegas, Stays in Vegas (Until Now).”

The saga (or “trials”) of Orenthal James Simpson is a headline writer’s delight.  But before we take too much fun away from his mayhem, consider this:

–Former L.A. Policemen say that Nicole Brown Simpson was brutalized, nearly decapitated and killed by “someone on a rage.” O.J. was accused of the murder, went to trial and was acquitted.

–Mr. Ronald Goldman, a waiter who may have been an innocent bystander, was also killed by the same killer, according to now retired L.A. Policemen.

–The audio tape of O. J. and his posse entering a hotel room and what ensued is damning on several levels.  Lawyers can suck “The Juice” out of Orenthal for many things he said; but one sentence stands out.  “Don’t let nobody out of this room. . . . Think you can steal my [expletive] and sell it?”  The first part indicates unlawful imprisonment or detention.  The second part indicates that O. J. thought he had ownership over the memorabilia.  If anyone owned O. J.’s memorabilia it was the family of Mr. Ronald Goldman, who won a civil suit against Mr. Simpson.  That court order required Mr. Simpson to pay $33.5 million in compensatory damages to the Goldman family, to Ron Goldman’s biological mother, and to the family of his ex-wife Nicole.  No payments were ever made.  The rules of the court required Mr. Simpson to liquidate assets to meet the obligations of the court.  If he thought he still “owned” memorabilia, he was violating the law.

–If a gun was used in the hotel room crimes, that further complicates Mr. Simpson’s woes.

–Finally, Tax Evasion still looms.  O. J. has probably been conducting a huge business in real or illicit memorabilia for years.  If evidence proves this to be true, when the court cases clear O.J. will still be hounded by the most feared arm of the Federal Bureaucracy: The Internal Revenue Service or I.R.S.  The most famous criminal in American history, Al Capone, a thug like O. J. who also got away with murder, also scammed the I.R.S. on his income taxes because the income was almost totally illegally obtained.  In Capone’s case, his posse had so intimidated witnesses to everything, including murder, that none would admit to seeing a thing.  What brought down Capone?  The I.R.S.

So this entire affair is an American tragedy.  Two people are dead, the American legal system suffered a severe blow to its credibility when O. J. was found innocent in the murder trial, and a one-time sports hero has been exposed for what he truly is: a thug, a tax evader, a man willing to threaten and use violence to achieve his ends, and a man with no regard for others: even his one-time wife.

O. J. has always hurdled past obstacles, just as he did in a famous rent-a-car commercial.

International readers have asked me, “How is O.J. really famous?”

O. J. is “famous” as a football star (both college and professional), as a movie star, as an advertiser’s dream in the rental car industry, as a man tried and NOT convicted of murder, and now as a protector of sports memorabilia.

But those last two honors, acquitted of murder and charged with unlawful entry and whatever else, do not make you famous.  They make you infamous.

The question is, can you toast juice?  A Nevada court will answer that.
*****

The essay above seemed just a little “too cute,” upon further reflection, so I am adding the statement below as a post script.

John E. Carey

There is also a horrifying reality to all of this. Mr. Simpson has been, by many accounts, a man out of control, for many years. Nicole Brown Simpson had called police before her fatal assault to complain about his brutality. Police even photographer her with severe bruising to her face and arms. Simpson was never charged with assault.

Mr. Simpson’s charm, which thousands of people have attested to, and his sporting achievements, which are the stuff of legend (and the National Football League’s “Hall of Fame”) made him the perfect guest for fawning sports memorabilia aficionados and the thugs that participate in a $2 Billion a year business. Many police officials and memorabilia experts say the vast majority of the high priced items available for sale are fakes.

This brings us to the NFL itself. We, the paying public, have fallen in love with a game that has brutality at its core. We have made the players, the owners, the coaches and tons of others millionaires. Many of the highly paid members of this fraternity are multi-millionaires.

I’ve been asking clients and friends what they thought about the NFL since the Michael Vick case erupted into the headlines. You know what? There is a growing group of men rejecting the NFL as loosely controlled mayhem.

One intellectual said to me, “The players of the NFL are the modern gladiators. Maybe they are even our society’s version of legal barbarians. Or maybe they are akin to the Roman Empire’s paid warriors or mercenaries.”

To him, accused dog killer Vick was no surprise and no anomaly. “O. J. Simpson has been a rage-filled man for years.  Society just didn’t let him get away with it. We rewarded him at every turn. We adored him.”

Vick, many other NFL “Bad Boys” like “Pacman” Jones and O. J. are a sad reflection of American society and culture.

This essay has also appeared on several other websites with the author’s permission.  This web site is from Australia (O.J. interest reached into the outback):
http://www.onlineopinion.com.au/view.asp?article=
6398

Related:
Infamous return: O. J. Again in the News

(After this essay was completed, Mr. Simpson was charged with seven felonies.  This is no joking matter.)

“Vick-Dog” Probably Running an “Out Pattern;” Entered Plea of “Not Guilty”

July 26, 2007

By John E. Carey
July 26, 2007

The Atlanta Falcons opened their football camp today, but Michael Vick was at a courthouse in Richmond, Va.

Vick arrived amid boos and pleaded not guilty during a reportedly uneventful and “not memorable” few minute hearing.

The trial in the “Vick-Dog” and friends dogfighting and conspiracy case; with federal crimes allegedly commited across state lines, a violation of the “Travel Act,” is set to begin Nov. 26.

Vick is charged along with three of his friends.

The other three men charged, according to the federal prosecutor’s indictment documents, are Purnell A. Peace, also known as “P-Funk” and “Funk,”  Quanis L. Phillips, also known as “Q,” Tony Taylor, also known as “T.”

The documents list the nickname of “Ookie”for Mr. Vick.

The four either face up to five years in prison and fines of up to $250,000 if convicted on the Travel Act violation, a felony, or one year in prison and up to $100,000 in fines if convicted on the charge of using a dog in a fighting venture.

Today Mr. Vick was released without bond.

According to football people we reached, “this probably means Michael is out for this season.  He’s running an ‘out pattern’ and he’s fighting for his name and his freedom now.”

Vick was jeered by a crowd as he went into court. He and three others entered their pleas in U.S. District Court to conspiracy charges involving competitive dogfighting, procuring and training pit bulls for fighting, and conducting the enterprise across state lines.

Mr. Vick’s lawyer, Billy Martin, read the following statement in behalf of his client:

“I take these charges very seriously and look forward to clearing my good name.  I respectfully ask all of you to hold your judgment until all of the facts are shown. Above all, I would like to say to my mom I’m sorry for what she has had to go through in this most trying of times. It has caused pain to my family and I apologize to my family.”

Related:

“Vick-Dog” Indictment Includes Street Names; Pleas this Afternoon

Falcons Eyed Ban on “Vick-Dog;” NFL Put Owner on Leash

Michael Vick-Dog; Dead Meat For Practice, Season?

NFL-er gone to the dogs?

Vick Dogfighting Charges Stir Stinging Reaction

“Pet Prowess” in America; Michael Vick to Coach at University of Beijing

Inside The Dog Fighting Underworld

+++++++++++++++

What is the “Travel Act”?

The Travel Act was passed in the  early 1960’s while Robert Kennedy was Attorney General.  The Act was in response to organized crime activity and Kennedy’s efforts to end it. The Act was intended to assist state and local authorities with limited resources in their efforts to combat organized crime. The Act provides that any individual who travels in interstate or foreign commerce or uses the mail or any facility in interstate or foreign commerce with the intent to:

  • Distribute the proceeds of any unlawful activity.
  • Commit a violent crime to further criminal activity.
  • Promote, manage, establish, carry on, or facilitate the promotion, management, establishment, or carrying on of any criminal activity.

may be guilty of violating the Travel Act.

Unlawful activity includes:

  • Extortion.
  • Bribery.
  • Arson.
  • Illegal gambling.
  • Illegal liquor offenses.
  • Narcotics.
  • Controlled substances.
  • Prostitution.
  • Tax evasion.

The Act is violated by movement in or use of interstate commerce with the intent of committing, furthering, or distributing proceeds of the above-listed series offenses.

Source:

The G. Green Law Practice, PLLC
http://www.geraldgreenlaw.com/article.jsp?practArea=38&articleIndex=4