Archive for the ‘meat’ Category

China official says tainted eggs “isolated” case

November 3, 2008

Before you read what China’s communist government says about poison in China’s products, consider this: the poison melamine has been found in Chinese made (and exported) products including toothpaste, cough syrup, eggs, milk, meat, chicken, biscuits, candy and a host of other products for about two years.  We believe, therefore, the claims by the esteemed member of the communist government seem completely without merit….as usual….But you decide for yourself.  If you “swallow” what communist China says, whatever you do, don’t swallow anything else made from within China….
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China’s agriculture minister has called the discovery of melamine-tainted eggs “isolated cases,” but urged continued scrutiny over the animal feed industry to ensure food safety.

In remarks posted on the ministry Web site late Sunday, Minister Sun Zhengcai said that “very few batches of eggs from very few companies” contained the chemical melamine.

Calling them “isolated cases,” he nevertheless said the Agriculture Ministry’s departments “should pay high attention” to the feed quality to ensure the safety of eggs and other animal products, and protect farmers’ interests.

A vendor waits for customers at her stall as she sells eggs ... 
A vendor waits for customers at her stall as she sells eggs at a market in Xiangfan, Hubei province November 3, 2007. Chinese eggs tainted with an industrial chemical were an isolated case, the Agriculture Minister was quoted saying the day after officials were ordered to crack the “dark” networks selling contaminated animal feed.REUTERS/Stringer (CHINA) CHINA OUT

Sun made the remarks during a trip to a farm in Dingxing county in northern Hebei Sunday.

Last week, four brands of Chinese eggs were found to be contaminated with melamine, and agriculture officials speculated that the cause was adulterated feed given to hens. No illnesses have been linked to melamine in eggs.

Other ministry officials have asserted that the practice of deliberately adding melamine to animal feed was widely practiced, signaling that melamine contamination may be more widespread than in just baby formula and dairy products.

Inspectors have destroyed 3,682 tons of animal feed that was tainted with the chemical. Commonly used in plastics and fertilizers, melamine is high in nitrogen, which registers as high protein levels in routine tests of food and feed.

Infant formula tainted with the chemical has been blamed for sickening tens of thousands of children and causing the deaths of four infants.

Though experts say at low levels it does not pose a risk to human health, higher concentrations of melamine harm the kidneys.

A child suffering from kidney stones receives medical treatment ...
A child suffering from kidney stones receives medical treatment at a hospital in Hefei, Anhui province in this September 19, 2008 file photo. The discovery of melamine in eggs as well as in baby formula, milk products, biscuits, chocolates and other foodstuffs containing milk derivatives confirms what experts have long suspected; that the chemical is deeply embedded in the human food chain. China is a major transgressor as carcinogenic chemicals are regularly used as food colouring agents or as preservatives, experts say. To match feature CHINA-MELAMINE/FOODCHAIN REUTERS/Stringer/Files (CHINA).

Over the weekend, Agriculture Ministry official Wang Zhicai said that inspection teams have descended on feed makers nationwide in a “punishment” campaign to ferret out those found using excessive amounts of the chemical melamine.

Among the 250,000 feed-makers and animal breeding farms inspected, inspectors found more than 500 engaged in illegal or questionable practices, with police further investigating 27 companies, Wang said. He likened the behavior of some of the companies to organized crime, calling them “black nests of gangsters.”

China has struggled to appear responsive to a widening food scandal. In the nearly two months since the government first acknowledged that melamine contaminated the milk supply, the chemical has been detected in eggs, candy and other products. Its presence in feed raises fears about the safety of meat and fish.

A little more than a year ago, China vowed to minimize the use of melamine after it was found in pet food exports that killed dogs and cats in North America in 2007.
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China: Feedmakers Using Melamine Are “Criminals” and a “Black Nests of Gangsters” Subject to “Punishment”

November 1, 2008

In a sign that the classic communism of old Mao’s China still lives, farmers and feed merchants using melamine were labeled as “evil criminals” and a “black nests of gangsters” subject to ” severe punishment” as inspectors swooped down to find those responsible for the tainted food scandal that is now more than 18 months old…. makers deliberately added an industrial chemical to their products, ignoring a year-old government rule meant to protect China’s food supply, a government official said.

From the Associated  Press

Animal feed

Inspection teams have descended on feed makers nationwide in a “punishment” campaign to ferret out those found using excessive amounts of the chemical melamine, Agriculture Ministry official Wang Zhicai said in remarks posted on the ministry’s Web site and carried by state media Saturday.

Among the quarter of a million feed-makers and animal breeding farms inspected, inspectors found more than 500 engaged in illegal or questionable practices, with police further investigating 27 companies, Wang said. He likened the behavior of some of the companies to organized crime, calling them “black nests of gangsters.”

“Adding melamine to feed is a criminal act and must be firmly attacked,” Wang said.

A workers sorts eggs into grades after they go through ultraviolet ... 
A workers sorts eggs into grades after they go through ultraviolet disinfection scan at a major eggs production factory in suburban Beijing, China, Friday, Oct. 31, 2008. Three more Chinese brands of eggs containing melamine have been identified and a local government has acknowledged that officials knew about the contamination for a month before it was publicly disclosed.(AP Photo/Andy Wong)

His remarks were the latest by a government that is trying to appear responsive to a widening food scandal. In the nearly two months since the government first acknowledged that melamine contaminated the milk supply, the chemical has been detected in eggs, candy and other products. Its presence in feed raises fears about the safety of meat and fish.

Commonly used in plastics and fertilizers, melamine is high in nitrogen, which registers as high protein levels in routine tests of food and feed. Though experts say at low levels it does not pose a risk to human health, higher concentrations harm the kidneys.

At least four children died from drinking tainted infant formula and milk powder and tens of thousands of others were sickened. The broad array of tainted products — and the government’s delayed response — has damaged public confidence at home and raised further questions about the quality of Chinese products in crucial export markets.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081101/ap_on_re_a
s/as_china_tainted_food_9

Related:
China Says It Will Tighten Control of Feed Industry;
After Years of Evidence of Poisoned Animal Feed

China Says It Will Tighten Control of Feed Industry; After Years of Evidence of Poisoned Animal Feed

November 1, 2008

China has pledged to tighten supervision of the animal feed industry, state media said Saturday, amid signs a toxic chemical found in milk and eggs was being mixed into livestock feed.

“The ministry will tighten its supervision of the feed industry and crack down on producers who add melamine to their products,” the China Daily quoted Wang Zhicai, head of the Agriculture Ministry’s livestock division as saying.

From AFP

Melamine, an industrial chemical normally used to make plastic, was first found to have been added to milk in China, leading to the death of four infants and sickening at least 53,000 other people.

The chemical — which can lead to severe kidney problems if ingested in large amounts — was then discovered in Chinese eggs, leading to concerns the chemical was much more prevalent in China’s food chain than initially believed.

A market in Xiamen. China has pledged to tighten supervision ... 
A market in Xiamen. China has pledged to tighten supervision of the animal feed industry, state media said Saturday, amid signs a toxic chemical found in milk and eggs was being mixed into livestock feed(AFP/File/Mark Ralston)

Wang acknowledged that the ministry issued a regulation in June last year banning the addition of melamine into livestock feed, according to a transcript of the interview on its website.

“Anyone who adds melamine into feed is acting against the law, we must resolutely combat this,” Wang said.

The ministry also introduced a “rigid” standard to test the level of melamine in feed, Wang said, following a scandal over contaminated feed exported to the United States that killed hundreds of pets there.

Despite this, experts have indicated melamine could still be being mixed into animal feed to make it appear higher in protein, and concerns are mounting that the practice is widespread.

In an editorial published on Friday, the China Daily said it was unclear whether melamine had found its way into other types of food.

Read vthe rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081101/wl_asia_afp/
chinafoodsafety_081101060657

Poison in Feed Not A New Problem in China
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China’s communist state media is trying to paint the poisoned animal feed problem as a dilemma just uncovered within the last 60-90 days.   Sadly, some respected Westen media including the BBC have swallowed and spread this line of lies.

 

I saw the improper mixing and use of animal feed in China years ago.  Chinese farmers were just trying to lessen the cost of feeding chickens and cattle.  And agricultural suppliers of all kinds in China work feverishly to sell “cheeper, better” feeds, insecticides and fertilizers.

Beijing’s government has little or no control over the millions of small manufacturers and farmers in the vast countryside of this rural nation of 1.3 billion people.  Until this last summer’s Olympics, Beijing had never even had food sanitation and safety standards written much less enforced for restaurants — a very basic of health taken for granted in the West.

On October 31, 2008, the BBC reported that the poison melamine was widely used in many food products in China and that “the melamine scandal began early in September.” 

Apparently the BBC took no note of the New York Times report a year ago last April (2007) that melamine was widely used in food products in China — and probably had been for years.  The Times called the use a melamine an “open secret” in China.
Here’s the report on melamine in China’s food supply from The New York Times from April 2007:
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ZHANGQIU, China, April 28, 2007 — As American food safety regulators head to China to investigate how a chemical made from coal found its way into pet food that killed dogs and cats in the United States, workers in this heavily polluted northern city openly admit that the substance is routinely added to animal feed as a fake protein.
.
For years, producers of animal feed all over China have secretly supplemented their feed with the substance, called melamine, a cheap additive that looks like protein in tests, even though it does not provide any nutritional benefits, according to melamine scrap traders and agricultural workers here.

“Many companies buy melamine scrap to make animal feed, such as fish feed,” said Ji Denghui, general manager of the Fujian Sanming Dinghui Chemical Company, which sells melamine. “I don’t know if there’s a regulation on it. Probably not. No law or regulation says ‘don’t do it,’ so everyone’s doing it. The laws in China are like that, aren’t they? If there’s no accident, there won’t be any regulation.”

Melamine is at the center of a recall of 60 million packages of pet food, after the chemical was found in wheat gluten linked this month to the deaths of at least 16 pets in the United States.

No one knows exactly how melamine (which is not believed to be particularly toxic) became so fatal in pet food, but its presence in any form of American food is illegal.

The link to China has set off concerns among critics of the Food and Drug Administration that ingredients in pet food as well as human food, which are increasingly coming from abroad, are not being adequately screened.

Above: Ariana Lindquist for The New York Times

“They have fewer people inspecting product at the ports than ever before,” says Caroline Smith DeWaal, the director of food safety for the Center for Science in the Public Interest in Washington. “Until China gets programs in place to verify the safety of their products, they need to be inspected by U.S. inspectors. This open-door policy on food ingredients is an open invitation for an attack on the food supply, either intentional or unintentional.”

Now, with evidence mounting that the tainted wheat gluten came from China, American regulators have been granted permission to visit the region to conduct inspections of food treatment facilities.

The Food and Drug Administration has already banned imports of wheat gluten from China after it received more than 14,000 reports of pets believed to have been sickened by packaged food. And last week, the agency opened a criminal investigation in the case and searched the offices of at least one pet food supplier.

The Department of Agriculture has also stepped in. On Thursday, the agency ordered more than 6,000 hogs to be quarantined or slaughtered after some of the pet food ingredients laced with melamine were accidentally sent to hog farms in eight states, including California.

Read the rest
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/30/business/worldbusiness/30food.html?ex=1335672000&en=b143bd4a5d0684b6&ei=5124&partner=permalink&exprod=permalink

They must not have the Internet in London because I found the New York Times report on melamine in China’s food supply on the Internet from April 2007 in just seconds.

My Vietnamese-born wife, who has been a guest of the communist prison and torture system said, “When you want to do business with communist China’s news media, you publish what they tell you or else.”

The BBC should be ashamed.

Shame On The BBC: Poison in Chinese Food System Known For Years

October 31, 2008

Today the BBC reported that the poison melamine was widely used in many food products in China and that “the melamine scandal began early in September.”  Sorry BBC, but the New York Times reported a year ago last April (2007) that melamine was widely used in food products in China. 

They must not have the Internet in London because I found the New York Times report on melamine in China’s food supply on the Internet from April 2007 in just seconds.

My Vietnamese-born wife, who has been a guest of the communist prison and torture system said, “When you want to do business with communist China’s news media, you publish what they tell you or else.”

The BBC should be ashamed. 

China treats free and open media about the way the Obama campaign treats conservative reporters….
See:
Obama’s Staff Expells Conservative Newpaper Reporters

I lived and worked in China and farmers eagerly showed Westerners like myself how much pesticide and fertilizer they used (overused) which has now contaminated about 90% of China’s underground water supply.  We were also aware of the use of “thinners” like melamine 10 years ago.  The farmers in China didn’t know it was bad so they were not afraid to discuss its use…..

Here’s the report on melamine in China’s food supply from The New York Times from April 2007:
.
ZHANGQIU, China, April 28, 2007 — As American food safety regulators head to China to investigate how a chemical made from coal found its way into pet food that killed dogs and cats in the United States, workers in this heavily polluted northern city openly admit that the substance is routinely added to animal feed as a fake protein.
.
For years, producers of animal feed all over China have secretly supplemented their feed with the substance, called melamine, a cheap additive that looks like protein in tests, even though it does not provide any nutritional benefits, according to melamine scrap traders and agricultural workers here.

“Many companies buy melamine scrap to make animal feed, such as fish feed,” said Ji Denghui, general manager of the Fujian Sanming Dinghui Chemical Company, which sells melamine. “I don’t know if there’s a regulation on it. Probably not. No law or regulation says ‘don’t do it,’ so everyone’s doing it. The laws in China are like that, aren’t they? If there’s no accident, there won’t be any regulation.”

Melamine is at the center of a recall of 60 million packages of pet food, after the chemical was found in wheat gluten linked this month to the deaths of at least 16 pets in the United States.

No one knows exactly how melamine (which is not believed to be particularly toxic) became so fatal in pet food, but its presence in any form of American food is illegal.

The link to China has set off concerns among critics of the Food and Drug Administration that ingredients in pet food as well as human food, which are increasingly coming from abroad, are not being adequately screened.

Above: Ariana Lindquist for The New York Times

“They have fewer people inspecting product at the ports than ever before,” says Caroline Smith DeWaal, the director of food safety for the Center for Science in the Public Interest in Washington. “Until China gets programs in place to verify the safety of their products, they need to be inspected by U.S. inspectors. This open-door policy on food ingredients is an open invitation for an attack on the food supply, either intentional or unintentional.”

Now, with evidence mounting that the tainted wheat gluten came from China, American regulators have been granted permission to visit the region to conduct inspections of food treatment facilities.

The Food and Drug Administration has already banned imports of wheat gluten from China after it received more than 14,000 reports of pets believed to have been sickened by packaged food. And last week, the agency opened a criminal investigation in the case and searched the offices of at least one pet food supplier.

The Department of Agriculture has also stepped in. On Thursday, the agency ordered more than 6,000 hogs to be quarantined or slaughtered after some of the pet food ingredients laced with melamine were accidentally sent to hog farms in eight states, including California.

Read the rest
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/30/business/worldbusiness/30
food.html?ex=1335672000&en=b143bd4a5d0684b6&ei=5124&p
artner=permalink&exprod=permalink

China’s Food: Poison Melamine May Be In Nearly Everything

October 31, 2008

The toxic chemical melamine is probably being routinely added to Chinese animal feed, state media has reported.

Correspondents say the unusually frank reports in several news outlets are an admission that contamination could be widespread throughout the food chain.

BBC

The melamine scandal began early in September, when at least four Chinese babies were killed by contaminated milk, and thousands more became ill.

A worker labors behind a stack of eggs before they are packaged ... 
A worker labors behind a stack of eggs before they are packaged at a major chicken eggs production factory in suburban Beijing, China, Friday, Oct. 31, 2008. Three more Chinese brands of eggs containing melamine have been identified and a local government has acknowledged that officials knew about the contamination for a month before it was publicly disclosed.(AP Photo/Andy Wong)

The news led firms across Asia to recall products made from Chinese milk.

The problem widened last weekend when the authorities in Hong Kong reported that melamine had also been detected in Chinese eggs.

Four brands of eggs have since been found to be contaminated, and agriculture officials speculate that the cause was probably melamine-laced feed given to hens.

Melamine is high in nitrogen, and the chemical is added to food products to make them appear to have a higher protein content.

‘Open secret’

Several state newspapers carried reports on Thursday suggesting that the addition of melamine to animal feed was widespread.

Read the rest:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7701477.stm

Realted:
China Says It Will Tighten Control of Feed Industry; After Years of Evidence of Poisoned Animal Feed

Junk food causes a third of heart attacks

October 21, 2008

Diets heavy in fried foods, salty snacks and meat account for about 35 percent of heart attacks globally, researchers reported on Monday.

Their study of 52 countries showed that people who ate a “Western” diet based on meat, eggs and junk food were more likely to have heart attacks, while those who ate more fruits and vegetables had a lower risk.

The study supports previous findings that show junk food and animal fats can cause heart disease, and especially heart attacks.

Dr. Salim Yusuf at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, and colleagues questioned more than 16,000 patients, 5,700 of whom had just suffered a first heart attack.

They took blood samples and had each patient fill out a detailed form on their eating habits between February 1999 and March 2003.

They divided the volunteers into three groups.

“The first factor was labeled ‘Oriental’ because of its high loading on tofu and soy and other sauces,” they wrote in their report, published in the journal Circulation.

“The second factor was labeled ‘Western’ because of its high loading on fried food, salty snacks, and meat intake. The third dietary factor was labeled ‘prudent’ because of its high loadings on fruit and vegetable intake.”

People who ate more fruits and vegetables had a 30 percent lower risk of heart attack compared to people who ate little or none of these foods, they found.

People eating a Western diet had a 35 percent greater risk of heart attack compared to people who consumed little or no fried foods and meat. Those eating the “Oriental” diet had an average risk of heart attack compared to the others.

The finding is important because it has not been clear if it is food per se or something else driving heart attack risk. Rich diets may be associated with a richer lifestyle that includes little or no exercise, for instance.

But the researchers note that heart disease is no longer an affliction only of the rich.

“Approximately 80 percent of the global cardiovascular disease burden occurs in low- and middle-income countries,” they wrote.

The tofu-rich diet could be neutral rather than protective because it is high in sodium, they said. High sodium intake can raise blood pressure and the risk of heart attack and stroke.

(Reporting by Maggie Fox from Reuters; Editing by Julie Steenhuysen)

Perils in The Price Of Each Grain of Rice

April 3, 2008

By David Ignatius
The Washington Post
Thursday, April 3, 2008; Page A17

You may have missed the front-page article in the New York Times last Saturday, with the one-column headline written in clipped newspaperese: “High Rice Cost Creating Fears of Asia Unrest.” But this little story could be an early warning of another big economic problem that’s sneaking up on us.

The new danger is global inflation — most worryingly in food prices, but also in prices for commodities, raw materials and products that require petroleum energy, which includes almost everything. Prices for these goods have been skyrocketing in international markets — at the same time the Federal Reserve and other central banks have been hosing the world with new money in their efforts to avoid a financial crisis.

That’s an explosive mixture. It risks a kind of inflation that would trigger panic buying, hoarding and fears of mass political protest. Actually, this is already happening in Asia, according to the Times.

The price of rice in global markets has nearly doubled in the last three months, reports the Times’s Keith Bradsher.
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Fearing shortages, some major rice producers — including Vietnam, India, Egypt and Cambodia — have sharply limited their rice exports so they can be sure they can feed their own people.

Bradsher summarizes the evidence that food shortages and inflation are fueling political unrest: “Since January, thousands of troops have been deployed in Pakistan to guard trucks carrying wheat and flour. Protests have erupted in Indonesia over soybean shortage, and China has put price controls on cooking oil, grain, meat, milk and eggs. Food riots have erupted in recent months in Guinea, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Senegal, Uzbekistan and Yemen.”

World Bank President Robert Zoellick rang the alarm bell in a speech yesterday. He noted that since 2005, the prices of staples have risen 80 percent. The real price of rice rose to a 19-year high last month, he said, while the real price of wheat hit a 28-year high.

Zoellick warned that this inflation is having political repercussions: “The World Bank Group estimates that 33 countries around the world face potential political and social unrest because of the acute hike in food and energy prices.” To cope with the topsy-turvy economy, Zoellick made an innovative proposal that countries running a surplus, such as Saudi Arabia and China, devote 1 percent of their “sovereign wealth” funds to investment in Africa‘s poor countries. That could yield up to $30 billion in development spending.

Now, cut to the Federal Reserve. At a time when global inflation is raging, you might expect that the central bank’s first priority would be to dampen inflationary expectations in the United States. But because of its worries about a financial meltdown, the Fed has been doing the opposite — drastically cutting interest rates in an effort to unclog the financial markets. The cheap money didn’t stop the Wall Street bank run — it was the Fed’s bold plan to absorb subprime debt that did that — but it may well add fuel to the inflation fire.

Related:
Lowly Rice Grain Impacts Global Economy

Vietnam and India move to limit rice exports

Inflation and Food Shortages?

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/04/02/AR2008040202997.html?hpid=opinionsbox1

China Defends Olympics Food Safety

February 22, 2008

 By Maureen Fan

Washington Post Foreign Service
Friday, February 22, 2008; Page A17

BEIJING, Feb. 21 — Stung by accusations that Beijing‘s food and water are contaminated, China on Thursday defended its standards and expressed disappointment that U.S. athletes will ship their own meat to China for the Olympic Games.

“I feel it’s a pity that they have decided to bring their own food,” said Kang Yi, chief of the catering division for the Beijing Olympics organizing committee, adding that the organizers had made plans for the athletes to dine together. “If the American delegation is not at that gathering, it’s a pity.”

A report in the New York Times this month said the U.S. Olympic Committee, in part worried about steroids in chicken, had made arrangements with sponsors to ship 25,000 pounds of lean protein to China two months before the opening ceremony. The 600-member U.S. delegation will eat at its own training center and avoid food at the athletes’ village, which will house and feed 17,000 people during the Games, the paper said.

Read the rest:
 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/21/AR2008022102664.html?hpid=moreheadlines

China struggles to avoid past mistakes in controlling food prices

February 11, 2008
by Guy Newey

HONG KONG (AFP) – Rocketing food prices in China have sown deep concern among the communist leadership, ever wary of social unrest, as they fumble to control inflation without repeating past mistakes, analysts say.
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Overall inflation in China is running at a 10-year high — around 6.9 percent in November year-on-year, official statistics show.

Inflation is now being driven almost exclusively by increases in the price of food, in particular the staple meat, pork, which has spiked 60 percent year-on-year.

Prices have faced even greater upward pressure in recent weeks, as severe weather has crippled the country’s transport system at the time demand is greatest, over Lunar New Year, the major annual holiday when millions of people return to home.

A report by Credit Suisse said 10 percent of China’s farming land has been affected by the extreme cold, and one percent could see a complete loss of crops and vegetables.

Price increases have been seen in food items ranging from cooking oil to apple juice, as China’s growth and global demand creates what economists have dubbed “agflation” referring specifically to rises in prices of agricultural commodities.

Analysts say authorities…
Read the rest
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080211/bs_afp/chinafoodpricesinflation_
080211035432

http://news.yahoo.com/20080211/bs_afp/chinafoodpricesinflation_080211035432

Standards for food exports: Vietnam on remote island

October 23, 2007

VietNamNet Bridge – Vietnam is making great efforts to build up sets of standards for exports, especially food and farm produce, in harmony with international standards.Vietnam’s commercial affairs division in Japan has continuously sent good news from Japan in the last few weeks.Japan may import meat-made products from Vietnam, and Vietnam won a bid to provide 21,000 tonnes of rice to the country. Until now, Vietnam has not been able to export pork-made products to Japan as Vietnam was listed among the countries where foot-and-mouth disease prevailed. However, Vietnamese enterprises have been warned that Japan sets very high requirements on the hygiene of food imports.
 Rice 02.jpg
Japan’s Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries has set up 29 requirements on meat imports from Vietnam. Vissan and Duc Viet are the two companies which are believed to be eligible to export products to Japan. The commercial affairs division said that it would persuade the ministry to send staffs to Vietnam to examine production and assess product quality before signing official agreements on importing meat-made products from Vietnam.Every year, Japan imports $200mil worth of processed meat products, and the imports are expected to increase in the coming years due to the higher domestic labour cost. Imports increased gradually from 3.2% in 2002 to 10% in 2006. The main meat exporters to Japan are China, the US, Italy, Thailand, Germany and Spain.Japan now imposes taxes of 8.5% on ham and 10% on sausage.

 As for rice exports, Vietnam has won bids to export 66,050 tonnes of rice so far this year. However, 31,050 tonnes of rice were refused as the consignments were found containing Acetamiprid at higher-than-allowed levels (0.01 pm). As a result, Japan has decided to examine 30% of Vietnam-sourced rice. However, with efforts by the two sides, deliveries of rice to fulfill the contracts were finally completed.Vietnam was able to avoid the dreaded inspection of 100% of rice imports. The fact that Vietnam, once again, has won a bid to export 21,000 tonnes of rice shows that Vietnamese rice exporters have regained the confidence of Japanese importers and consumers. 

Integrating in standardisation to boost exports  Experts have pointed out that in the period of global integration, instead of protecting local production with tariffs, countries will set technical barriers. Vietnam will have no other choice than integrating in standardisation if it wants to boost exports. The problem lies in the fact that there exists a big gap between Vietnam’s and the world’s standards.Soybean sauce is a typical example. According to EU standards, the maximum recommended daily intake of 3-MCPD is 0.02mg/kg of body weight, or 50 times lower than the standard applied in Vietnam (1mg/kg of body weight/day). Soybean sauce produced in Vietnam has a high level of 3-MCPD, and thus is not recommended for use in the EU. International experts have advised Vietnam to bring its standards closer to international standards. 3-MCPD not only exists in soybean source, but in many other Vietnamese export items as well like cereals, dairy products, meat and fish. Otherwise, Vietnam will close the door to the world’s market on itself.