Archive for the ‘KKK’ Category

The Audacity of Obama-Wright Rhetoric

March 30, 2008

By Thomas Sowell
The Washington Times
March 30, 2008
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It is painful to watch defenders of Barack Obama tying themselves into knots trying to evade the obvious.

Some are saying that Senator Obama cannot be held responsible for what his pastor, Jeremiah Wright, said. In their version of events, Barack Obama just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time — and a bunch of mean-spirited people are trying to make something out of it.

It makes a good story, but it won’t stand up under scrutiny.

Barack Obama’s own account of his life shows that he consciously sought out people on the far left fringe. In college, “I chose my friends carefully,” he said in his first book, “Dreams From My Father.”

These friends included “Marxist professors and structural feminists and punk rock performance poets” — in Obama’s own words — as well as the “more politically active black students.” He later visited a former member of the terrorist Weatherman underground, who endorsed him when he ran for state senator.

Obama didn’t just happen to encounter Jeremiah Wright, who just happened to say some way out things. Jeremiah Wright is in the same mold as the kinds of people Barack Obama began seeking out in college — members of the left, anti-American counter-culture.

In Shelby Steele’s brilliantly insightful book about Barack Obama — “A Bound Man” — it is painfully clear that Obama was one of those people seeking a racial identity that he had never really experienced in growing up in a white world. He was trying to become a convert to blackness, as it were — and, like many converts, he went overboard.

Nor has Obama changed in recent years. His voting record in the U.S. Senate is the furthest left of any Senator. There is a remarkable consistency in what Barack Obama has done over the years, despite inconsistencies in what he says.

The irony is that Obama’s sudden rise politically to the level of being the leading contender for his party’s presidential nomination has required him to project an entirely different persona, that of a post-racial leader who can heal divisiveness and bring us all together.

The ease with which he has accomplished this chameleon-like change, and entranced both white and black Democrats, is a tribute to the man’s talent and a warning about his reliability.

There is no evidence that Obama ever sought to educate himself on the views of people on the other end of the political spectrum, much less reach out to them. He reached out from the left to the far left.
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That’s bringing us all together?

Is “divisiveness” defined as disagreeing with the agenda of the left?
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Who on the left was ever called divisive by Obama before that became politically necessary in order to respond to revelations about Jeremiah Wright?

One sign of Obama’s verbal virtuosity was his equating a passing comment by his grandmother — “a typical white person,” he says — with an organized campaign of public vilification of America in general and white America in particular, by Jeremiah Wright.

Since all things are the same, except for the differences, and
different except for the similarities, it is always possible to make things look similar verbally, however different they are in the real world.

Among the many desperate gambits by defenders of Senator Obama and Jeremiah Wright is to say that Wright’s words have a “resonance” in the black community.

There was a time when the Ku Klux Klan’s words had a resonance among whites, not only in the South but in other states. Some people joined the KKK in order to advance their political careers. Did that make it OK? Is it all just a matter of whose ox is gored?

While many whites may be annoyed by Jeremiah Wright’s words, a year from now most of them will probably have forgotten about him. But many blacks who absorb his toxic message can still be paying for it, big- time, for decades to come.

Why should young blacks be expected to work to meet educational standards, or even behavioral standards, if they believe the message that all their problems are caused by whites, that the deck is stacked against them? That is ultimately a message of hopelessness, however much audacity it may have.

Obama Wounded by Association With Fiery Pastor?

March 15, 2008

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom 

It now seems that Senator Obama’s bid for the White House has suffered a significant set back due to his association with the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr.

Some of Rev. Wright’s sermons have been called “revolutionary” and “unAmerican.”
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., ... 
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., left, shown here with his pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright of Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, March 10, 2005. Obama on Friday March 14, 2008 denounced inflammatory remarks from his pastor, who has railed against the United States and accused the country of bringing on the Sept. 11 attacks by spreading terrorism.(AP Photo/Trinity United Church of Christ)

Rev. Wright, former pastor at Chicago’s Trinity United Church of Christ, married the Senator and his wife, baptized his children and preached to him on Sundays for more than 17 years.  Senator Obama told Major Garrett of the Fox News Network that he frequently made donations to the church and hired Rev. Wright to assist as a campaign adviror.  Senator Obama also prayed with Rev. Wright before the Senator announced his run for the presidency.

In a sermon on the Sunday after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, Wright suggested the United States brought on the attacks.

“We bombed Hiroshima, we bombed Nagasaki, and we nuked far more than the thousands in New York and the Pentagon, and we never batted an eye,” Wright said. “We have supported state terrorism against the Palestinians and black South Africans, and now we are indignant because the stuff we have done overseas is now brought right back to our own front yards. America’s chickens are coming home to roost.”

In a 2003 sermon, he said blacks should condemn the United States.

“The government gives them the drugs, builds bigger prisons, passes a three-strike law and then wants us to sing ‘God Bless America.’ No, no, no, God damn America, that’s in the Bible for killing innocent people. God damn America for treating our citizens as less than human. God damn America for as long as she acts like she is God and she is supreme.”

He also gave a sermon in December comparing Obama to Jesus, promoting his candidacy and criticizing his rival, Hillary Rodham Clinton.

“Barack knows what it means to be a black man to be living in a country and a culture that is controlled by rich white people,” Wright told a cheering congregation. “Hillary can never know that. Hillary ain’t never been called a nigger.”

The Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. performed Barack Obama's wedding ceremony and held a largely ceremonial role on a campaign committee.
The Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. performed Barack Obama’s wedding ceremony and held a largely ceremonial role on a campaign committee. (By E. Jason Wambsgans — Chicago Tribune)

Leaders of the Black American community appeared on several TV talk shows last night and this morning to say that White people don’t understand the Black church or Black culture.

The problem is: people do understand that when one hints or implies that America caused a justifiable 9/11 attack upon the World Trade Centers and the Pentagon the accusation is unfounded an inflamatory.

Senator Obama has denounced the preacher and removed him from his team of advisors.

Senator Obama has said that he was not present in the church during Rev. Wrights most disconcerting sermons — but people are asking how the Senator could have participated in that church for so long and been so close to Rev. Wright without realizing that the preacher’s rhetoric was going to cause him problems down the road someday.

The problem is: the road is here now.  And the video tapes of Rev. Wright’s sermons will likely hurt a steamrolling Obama campaign.

Visit us at:
https://johnibii.wordpress.com/

Related:
Outspoken Minister Out Of Obama Campaign

Obama denounces pastor’s 9/11 comments

Race issue marring election unnecessarily
http://www.nowpublic.com/culture/race-issue-marring-election-unnecessarily

Trinity United Church of Christ (Chicago):
http://www.tucc.org/home.htm

Obama denounces pastor’s 9/11 comments

March 14, 2008
By NEDRA PICKLER, Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON – Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama on Friday denounced inflammatory remarks from his pastor, who has railed against the United States and accused its leaders of bringing on the Sept. 11 attacks by spreading terrorism.

As video of the Rev. Jeremiah Wright has widely aired on television and the Internet, Obama responded by posting a blog about his relationship with Wright and his church, Chicago‘s Trinity United Church of Christ, on the Huffington Post.

Obama wrote that he’s looked to Wright for spiritual advice, not political guidance, and he’s been pained and angered to learn of some of his pastor’s comments for which he had not been present. Obama’s statement did not say whether Wright would remain on his African American Religious Leadership Committee, and campaign officials wouldn’t say either.

“I categorically denounce any statement that disparages our great country….

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080314/ap_on_el_pr/
obama_pastor;_ylt=AllYjqgCzJI
kor1oZAvfnMSs0NUE

Related:
Obama’s Pastor Known for “Inflammatory Rhetoric”

Obama Strives To Keep Divisive Minister At a Distance

Race Issue Marring Election Unnecessarily

Outspoken Minister Out Of Obama Campaign

Obama Wounded by Association With Fiery Pastor?

Race Issue Marring Election Unnecessarily

March 14, 2008

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom

This is an election featuring a Black Man and a White Woman – but mentioning that fact might get you accused of racism, bigotry, fanaticism, zealotry and other forms of treachery.

Take Geraldine Ferraro, for example.  She was quoted recently is a California newspaper saying, “If Obama was a white man, he would not be in this position. And if he was a woman [of any color] he would not be in this position. He happens to be very lucky to be who he is. And the country is caught up in the concept.”

Former vice-presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro addresses ... 

Obama surrogates unloaded on her; inferring if not saying outright that she was a racist.

Hillary, instead of running to her friend’s assistance, said, “I didn’t say it.”

Many in the Black American community acted appalled.

Give me a break.

This came closely on the heels of another firestorm caused when an Obama advisor called Senator Clinton a “Monster.”

Even Bill Clinton, once referred to as “The First Black President,” has taken the heat and been tarred and feathered as a bigot from Black Church pulpits.

Sum up all the criticism from Black toward white and you find one word in the undercurrent: division.

The only guy that hasn’t taken too much heat for his over the top language is long-time Obama pastor Reverend Jeremiah A. Wright Jr.  He said “God Bless America” should be changed to “God Damn America,” he implied that America deserved the carnage of September 11, 2001, and he more than hinted that the KKK was running things in America. 

Barack Obama, Rev. Jeremiah Wright

Not divisive, right?

If you think it is, I dare you to criticize him.  The Black Leader Union will attack you for sure.

When a recent study reported that one quarter of America’s teenage girls has a sexually transmitted disease, you just about had to read the fine print before you saw that the study also concluded that fully fifty percent of the teenage Black girls had an STD. To use this fact in a headline, one newspaper editor told me, would be “Journalistic suicide.”

You cannot fix problems until you face them.  And it is difficult to face issues unless and until you can discuss them.

So the Black Leadership Union of America has created and fosters an atmosphere of ignoring facts and not facing the truth.  This allows them to perpetuate the idea that White people are holding the Black population back.  And it allows these so-called Black Leaders to sustain their “positions,” “reputations” and don’t forget donations.

Bill Cosby is among just a handful of Black Leaders that has been critical of his own Black people. For his efforts he has been roundly criticized by other members of the Black American Leadership Union and called an “Uncle Tom” in many churches.

I spend a significant amount of time in the Asian-American community.  Last Sunday we taught English as a Second Language to Vietnamese-American immigrants and just yesterday I worked with Korean-Americans on their language skills.

When I asked them about race being used in this election and all the reflections and facets of that use, I was simply told by Asian-Americans, “It’s not polite.”

Last night during a public appearance, while refusing to talk about her controversial comment about Obama, Geraldine Ferraro made the audience pause when she took a shot at how Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas — a Republican and the second black judge to sit on the court — gained admittance to Yale University’s law school.
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“Take a look and think about Justice Thurgood Marshall,” said Ferraro, referring to the first black judge to sit on the high court, “who drew on his life experiences as an African-American and as a civil-rights activist to write some of the greatest civil-rights decisions of the sixties and of the entire century.” Then she said that she did not think Thomas showed the same “sensitivity” as Marshall. Thomas, Ferraro said, acts as a rubber stamp for conservative Justice Antonin Scalia and “votes against affirmative action, which got him into Yale.”

Geraldine, you apparently just don’t get it.  Despite laws protecting your freedom to speak out, the Black Leader Union is watching you now and they’re ready to pounce.

Is this good for America, do you think?

I am not a racist.  But I expect I’ll be accused of that because of this essay.

Obama Strives To Keep Divisive Minister At a Distance

March 14, 2008

By Brian DeBos
The Washington Times
March 14, 2008

The Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr., a mentor and friend to Sen. Barack Obama for 20 years, in a recent sermon shouted: “God damn America” for its history of slavery, racism and oppression against its black citizens.
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Mr. Wright — who baptized Mr. Obama at the Trinity United Church of Christ, presided over his wedding there and inspired him in his career as a community activist and a politician — has been a lightning rod for the campaign from the very beginning.
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When Mr. Obama announced his candidacy for president, Mr. Wright, who is also a member of Mr. Obama’s National African American Religious Leadership Committee, was asked not to appear because of his “black power” social views, which many have criticized as separatist, forcing Mr. Obama to distance himself from his home pastor.
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He has given many fiery sermons in his career and has called Nation of Islam head Louis Farrakhan his friend, but it is his final sermon as head pastor, given Feb. 10, that has called his relationship with Mr. Obama and his views into question again.
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“Hillary was not a black boy raised in a single-parent home. Barack was. Barack knows what it means to be a black man living in a country and a culture that is controlled by rich white people,” Mr. Wright said.
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“Hillary can never know that. Hillary ain’t never been called a n—-er.”
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Mr. Wright went on to detail all the ways in which Hillary is not black enough to represent black Americans, and he also attempted to paint Mr. Obama as a Jesus figure, saying his life parallels that of Christ.
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“Jesus was a poor black man who lived in a country and who lived in a culture that was controlled by rich white people. The Romans were rich. The Romans were Italians, which means they were Europeans, which means they were white, and they controlled everything in Jesus’ country.”

Related:
Obama’s Pastor Known for “Inflammatory Rhetoric”

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080314/NATION/729484602/1001

See also coverage from The New York Post:
http://www.nypost.com/seven/03142008/news/national
news/9_11_slur_by_obama_rev__101937.htm

Obama’s Pastor Known for “Inflammatory Rhetoric”

March 13, 2008

Obama’s Pastor, Rev. Jeremiah Wright, Has a History of What Even Obama’s Campaign Aides Say Is ‘Inflammatory Rhetoric’

ABC News

The Rev. Jeremiah Wright, Obama’s pastor for the last 20 years at the Trinity United Church of Christ on Chicago’s south side, has a long history of what even Obama’s campaign aides concede is “inflammatory rhetoric,” including the assertion that the United States brought on the 9/11 attacks with its own “terrorism.”

In a campaign appearance earlier this month, Sen. Obama said, “I don’t think my church is actually particularly controversial.” He said Rev. Wright “is like an old uncle who says things I don’t always agree with,” telling a Jewish group that everyone has someone like that in their family.

Barack Obama, Rev. Jeremiah Wright

Rev. Wright married Obama and his wife Michelle, baptized their two daughters and is credited by Obama for the title of his book, “The Audacity of Hope.”

An ABC News review of dozens of Rev. Wright’s sermons, offered for sale by the church, found repeated denunciations of the U.S. based on what he described as his reading of the Gospels and the treatment of black Americans.

“The government gives them the drugs, builds bigger prisons, passes a three-strike law and then wants us to sing ‘God Bless America.’ No, no, no, God damn America, that’s in the Bible for killing innocent people,” he said in a 2003 sermon. “God damn America for treating our citizens as less than human. God damn America for as long as she acts like she is God and she is supreme.”

In addition to damning America, he told his congregation on the Sunday after Sept. 11, 2001 that the United States had brought on al Qaeda’s attacks because of its own terrorism.

“We bombed Hiroshima, we bombed Nagasaki, and we nuked far more than the thousands in New York and the Pentagon, and we never batted an eye,” Rev. Wright said in a sermon on Sept. 16, 2001.

“We have supported state terrorism against the Palestinians and black South Africans, and now we are indignant because the stuff we have done overseas is now brought right back to our own front yards. America’s chickens are coming home to roost,” he told his congregation.

Sen. Obama told the New York Times he was not at the church on the day of Rev. Wright’s 9/11 sermon. “The violence of 9/11 was inexcusable and without justification,” Obama said in a recent interview. “It sounds like he was trying to be provocative,” Obama told the paper.

Rev. Wright, who announced his retirement last month, has built a large and loyal following at his church with his mesmerizing sermons, mixing traditional spiritual content and his views on contemporary issues.

“I wouldn’t call it radical. I call it being black in America,” said one congregation member outside the church last Sunday.

“He has impacted the life of Barack Obama so much so that he wants to portray that feeling he got from Rev. Wright onto the country because we all need something positive,” said another member of the congregation.

Rev. Wright, who declined to be interviewed by ABC News, is considered one of the country’s 10 most influential black pastors, according to members of the Obama campaign.

Obama has praised at least one aspect of Rev. Wright’s approach, referring to his “social gospel” and his focus on Africa, “and I agree with him on that.”

Sen. Obama declined to comment on Rev. Wright’s denunciations of the United States, but a campaign religious adviser, Shaun Casey, appearing on “Good Morning America” Thursday, said Obama “had repudiated” those comments.

In a statement to ABCNews.com, Obama’s press spokesman Bill Burton said, “Sen. Obama has said repeatedly that personal attacks such as this have no place in this campaign or our politics, whether they’re offered from a platform at a rally or the pulpit of a church.

Sen. Obama does not think of the pastor of his church in political terms. Like a member of his family, there are things he says with which Sen. Obama deeply disagrees. But now that he is retired, that doesn’t detract from Sen. Obama’s affection for Rev. Wright or his appreciation for the good works he has done.”