Archive for the ‘kidnapping’ Category

US says Afghanistan insurgent leader captured

November 15, 2008

Afghan and coalition forces captured an insurgent leader in eastern Afghanistan, and in a separate operation 10 militants were killed in a firefight, the U.S. military said Saturday.

U.S. forces said they grabbed a “key insurgent leader” in a joint raid with Afghan police Friday in a village in eastern Ghazni province. No shots were fired in the raid, the statement said.

By HEIDI VOGT, Associated Press Writer

Policemen outside Kabul. The US-led force in Afghanistan said ... 
Policemen outside Kabul. The US-led force in Afghanistan said Saturday its troops had killed 10 militants, including foreign fighters, in an operation against the Al-Qaeda-linked Haqqani militant network(AFP/File/Massoud Hossaini)

The captured man is responsible for the deaths of Afghan troops, bomb attacks on coalition forces and the kidnapping of aid workers, according to the statement. A spokesman declined to give further information on the leader’s identity while they search for his confederates.

Coalition forces also killed 10 militants in a strike against a bomb-making cell in the eastern Paktya province Friday, the U.S. military said.

The troops were targeting several key figures in a network run by Jalaluddin Haqqani, a militant leader believed to operate out of Pakistan, the military statement said.

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http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081115/ap_on_re_as/as_
afghanistan;_ylt=ArC9xsoxOh1T33MQ2AqSpWms0NUE

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Pakistan’s ambassador held by Taliban

April 19, 2008

By Augustine Anthony

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – Pakistan‘s ambassador to Afghanistan, who went missing in February in the Khyber region, appeared on Arabic television on Saturday saying he was being held by the Taliban and urged Islamabad to meet their demands.
Ambassador Tariq Azizuddin is seen in this undated handout photograph ... 
Ambassador Tariq Azizuddin is seen in this undated handout photograph released by the Pakistani embassy in Kabul on February 12, 2008. Pakistan’s ambassador to Afghanistan who went missing in February appeared in a video on Al Arabiya television on Saturday saying that he is being held by Taliban militants and urged his government to meet their demands.(Pakistan Embassy Handout/Reuters)

Ambassador Tariq Azizuddin appeared in a video tape on Al Arabiya television surrounded by armed militants to make his first public statement since going missing.

“We were kidnapped by mujahideen from the Taliban,” the ambassador, wearing an open-necked shirt and looking calm, said in the remarks which were translated from Urdu into Arabic.

“I suffer health problems such as high blood pressure and heart pains,” said the bespectacled and grey-bearded ambassador, who gestured to his armed captors in an arid, hilly region.

Scores of people have been kidnapped in the dangerous border region between Afghanistan and Pakistan and the ambassador’s disappearance highlighted instability in nuclear-armed Pakistan — a major ally in the U.S.-led crackdown on militants.

The Pakistani government had not publicly confirmed he had been kidnapped but a senior government official said on Saturday Azizuddin was being held by militants who were demanding the release of their arrested colleagues.

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http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080419/wl_nm/pakistan_
afghanistan_envoy_dc_7

 

 

Pulling the plug on Pyongyang

February 3, 2008

By James T. Hackett
The Washington Times
February 3, 2008

In 2005, the president changed policy toward North Korea. After years of withholding tribute and applying pressure, he switched to accommodation. It has not worked. He should revitalize the alliance with Japan and the new South Korean government, and return to a policy of containment.

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The failure of the current policy was spelled out by Jay Lefkowitz, a New York lawyer and former deputy assistant in the Bush White House, and since 2005 the President’s Envoy on Human Rights in North Korea. In remarks at the American Enterprise Institute, Mr. Lefkowitz suggested the six-party talks have failed and now North Korea is merely awaiting the end of the Bush administration. He deserves a medal for telling the truth.

Jay Lefkowitz, the U.S. envoy for human rights in North Korea, ...
Jay Lefkowitz


For decades the Kim dynasty that rules the North made trouble by assassinating enemies in foreign lands, kidnapping Japanese citizens, launching missiles of increasing range, selling missiles to countries in the Middle East, maintaining a million-man army, and developing nuclear weapons. The North’s antics concern this country mainly because thousands of U.S. troops are still in South Korea, but its behavior also should concern the North’s neighbors.

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http://www.washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080203/COMMENTARY/101684866

North Korean leader Kim Jong-il (C) is seen at an undisclosed ...
North Korean leader Kim Jong-il (C).