Archive for the ‘Java’ Category

Coal Can’t Fill World’s Burning Appetite

March 20, 2008

By Steven Mufson and Blaine Harden
Washington Post Staff Writers
Thursday, March 20, 2008; Page A01

Long considered an abundant, reliable and relatively cheap source of energy, coal is suddenly in short supply and high demand worldwide.

A labourer searches for usable coal at a cinder dump site at ...
A labourer searches for usable coal at a cinder dump site at Daming Coal Mine in Diaobingshan, Liaoning province February 24, 2008. China, the world’s top steel producer, is struggling with a shortage of coking coal after a power crisis in the country prompted Beijing to urge its mines to focus their efforts on raising thermal coal supplies.
REUTERS/Stringer (CHINA) CHINA OUT
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An untimely confluence of bad weather, flawed energy policies, low stockpiles and voracious growth in Asia‘s appetite has driven international spot prices of coal up by 50 percent or more in the past five months, surpassing the escalation in oil prices.The signs of a coal crisis have been showing up from mine mouths to factory gates and living rooms: As many as 45 ships were stacked up in Australian ports waiting for coal deliveries slowed by torrential rains. China and Vietnam, which have thrived by sending goods abroad, abruptly banned coal exports, while India‘s import demands are up. Factory hours have been shortened in parts of China, and blackouts have rippled across South Africa and Indonesia‘s most populous island, Java.

A labourer searches for usable coal at a cinder dump site in ...
A labourer searches for usable coal at a cinder dump site in Changzhi, Shanxi province.  China has the world’s deadliest mines, where explosions, cave-ins and floods killed nearly 3,800 people last year. Coal accounts for about 70 percent of electricity production for the booming economy. But efforts to improve safety have been frustrated by lax enforcement, weak safety regimes and corruption among local officials and mine owners chasing profits.
REUTERS/Stringer (CHINA) CHINA OU

Meanwhile mining companies are enjoying a windfall. Freight cars in Appalachia are brimming with coal for export, and old coal mines in Japan have been reopened or expanded. European and Japanese coal buyers, worried about future supplies, have begun locking in long-term contracts at high prices, and world steel and concrete prices have risen already, fueling inflation.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/03/19/AR2008031903859.html?hpid=topnews