Archive for the ‘Islamist’ Category

Mumbai Terrorists: The Facts We Know

December 3, 2008

In Mumbai, it is now apparent that the terrorists that struck the hotels and other sites, killed nearly 200, tortured Jewish prisoners before putting them to death, and threw around hand grenades indiscriminately, were not your grandparents terrorists.

Because the Indian police captured one terrorist alive and a wealth of material and forensic evidence, we know several facts about the Mumbai terrorists:

–The surviving terrorist has told authorities he and the others were trained in Pakistan by the Islamist militant group, Lashkar-e-Taiba.

–The terrorists were well armed with modern, first-rate automatic weapons and hand grenades.

–They used every conceivable modern technology to assist them in their deadly task: cell phones, GPS, Blackberries, text messaging and other tools were found.

–They had prepared physically and mentally for a long siege.  The dead terrorists are “beefy” well muscled men who seem to have worked out physically for months recently. There is some evidence that the terrorists used steroids.

–The susviving terrorist has spoken about mental and Islamic readiness and the fact that none of the terrorists had any fear of death.

–The terrorist, though Islamic fanatics, used cocaine, LSD and other drugs to assist them to stay awake and “one the edge.” Syringes, paraphernalia, and steroids were found on some of the terrorists.

–At least one terrorist wore a shirt bearing the Versace logo; a kind of Muslim taboo.  The use of the logo indicates that these men are unafraid to embrace what some Muslims consider “decadent.” 

The wearing of the “decadent” logo might seem a small, seemingly unimportant fact. But it could be evidence, combined with the drug use and other evidence, that these terrorist are unencumbered by any religious, cultural,  moral or other restrictions.

A criminal psychologist schooled in terrorism told Peace and Freedom, “these are mad dogs off the leash.”

This image taken from NDTV shows a man wearing a T-shirt with ... 
This image taken from NDTV shows a man wearing a T-shirt with a “Versace” logo carrying an automatic weapon as he enters a train station in Mumbai, late November 26. The man, Ajmal Amir Kamal, 21, is being interrogated in a safe house in Mumbai, reports said.(AFP/NDTV/File)
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Top U.S. Spy: Mumbai Terror Came From Radical Pakistani Islamic Militant Group

December 3, 2008

Yesterday what India has been saying was verified by the top U.S. spy: the bloodshed and terror in Mumbai was caused by Lashkar-e-Taiba.  A spokesman for the Pakistan-based group denied any involvement in the Mumbai atrocities.  Lashkar-e-Taiba or     is one of the    shadowy Islamist groups such as Al-Qaeda that the U.S. and the rest of Western intelligence has been watching and fighting since September 11, 2001….

The radical Islamic group, whose name means “Army of the Pious,” has past links to both Pakistani intelligence and Al-Qaeda.

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US Director of National Intelligence Mike McConnell late Tuesday blamed Lashkar-e-Taiba for the deadly attacks in Mumbai, the first time a US official publicly fingered the group.

“The same group that we believe is responsible for Mumbai had a similar attack in 2006 attack on a train and killed a similar number of people,” said McConnell, speaking at Harvard University. “Go back to 2001 and it was an attack on the parliament.”

McConnell did not mention Lashkar-e-Taiba by name, but the group, which fought Indian rule in divided Kashmir, is notorious for a deadly assault on the Indian parliament in 2001. That attack pushed New Delhi and Islamabad to the brink of war.

By Carlos Hamann, AFP

US Director of National Intelligence Mike McConnell, pictured ...
US Director of National Intelligence Mike McConnell, pictured in February, 2008, on Tuesday blamed the group Lashkar-e-Taiba for last week’s deadly attacks in Mumbai.(AFP/File/Saul Loeb)

The radical Islamic group, whose name means “Army of the Pious,” has past links to both Pakistani intelligence and Al-Qaeda.

McConnell, the top US intelligence official, said he did not see the Mumbai attack as a new form of terrorism.

“If you examine the groups we think are responsible, the philosophical underpinnings are very similar to what Al-Qaeda puts out as their view of how the world should be. It is a continuation,” he said.

About 10 gunmen landed in rubber dinghies in Mumbai and wreaked havoc with automatic weapons and hand grenades, in an assault that killed at least 188 people and injured more than 300. The dead included 22 foreign nationals.

In his speech, McConnell emphasized the difficulty in fighting shadowy Islamist groups such as Al-Qaeda and Lashkar-e-Taiba.

“Democratic systems that promote free speech and free movement and open discussion are incredibly vulnerable to someone who is willing to die in the context of a suicide bomber or a suicide attack,” McConnell said.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081203/pl_af
p/indiaattacksusmcconnell_081203025117

Pakistan: Near Economic Collapse and Besieged By Terrorists Now Must Deal With U.S., India

December 1, 2008

Indian accusations of a Pakistani hand in last week’s Mumbai massacre couldn’t have come at a worse time for the government in Islamabad: As a Taliban insurgency continues to simmer in the tribal areas along the Afghan border, clashes on Sunday between rival political groups in the southern metropolis of Karachi killed 13 people and wounded 70.

The country is on the verge of economic collapse, its desperate pleas for financial assistance from China and Saudi Arabia last month having been rebuffed, forcing Pakistan to accept loans from the International Monetary Fund – but those loans come with stern conditions limiting government spending, the implementation of which will risk inflaming further unrest. A suspected U.S. predator drone attack in the tribal areas on Saturday – one of dozens in recent months – has further alienated a population already suspicious of U.S. interference. Hardly surprising, then, that Pakistani leaders have reacted with alarm to politicians and the media in India pointing a finger at Pakistan-based terror groups over the Mumbai attack. Some foreign investigators have made similar claims, although not in any official capacity.

Most Pakistanis reacted with horror to news of the Mumbai killing spree starting Wednesday, having lived through equally devastating attacks on their own soil. But that initial sympathy quickly gave way to hostility as the focus of blame landed on Pakistan – a knee-jerk first reaction, rather than one based on any solid evidence. “It is a tragic incident, and we also felt bad about it as Pakistan is going through the same problem,” says Abdur Rashid, a 67-year-old retired government servant in Rawalpindi, near Islamabad. “But it was really unfortunate to see that even before the operation [to clear out the attackers] was finished, the Indian government stated that Pakistan is involved. It sounds that the entire incident was concocted to punish Pakistan.” See images of Mumbai after the siege….

Read the rest from MUZI:
http://dailynews.muzi.com/news/ll/english/10083894.shtml

US Fears Pakistani Role in India Attacks; FBI To Assist

November 29, 2008

U.S. officials are worried about a possible surge in violence between India and Pakistan after the attacks in Mumbai. To ease tensions, intelligence officials are searching for clues that might identify the attackers even as Indian officials claim “elements in Pakistan” were involved.

FBI agents were preparing to fly to India. The State Department warned U.S. citizens still in the city that their lives remain at risk.

A U.S. counterterrorism official said some “signatures of the attack” were consistent with the work of Pakistani militant groups known as Lashkar-e-Taiba and Jaish-e-Mohammed that have fought Indian troops in the disputed Himalayan region of Kashmir and also are reported to be linked to al-Qaida.

Indian firefighters attempt to put out a fire at the historic ...
Indian firefighters attempt to put out a fire at the historic Taj Mahal hotel in Mumbai. Special forces have stormed a Mumbai Jewish centre and battled to free guests at two hotels, as India blamed Pakistan for an audacious Islamist militant attack that left at least 130 people dead.(AFP/Indranil Mukherjee)

By MATTHEW LEE and PAMELA HESS, Associated Press Writer

But the official emphasized it was premature to pinpoint who was responsible for the attacks. A second official, specializing in counterintelligence, also cautioned against rushing to judgment on the origins of the gunmen.

The U.S. officials spoke on condition of anonymity due to the sensitivity of the situation.

The U.S. Embassy in New Delhi on Saturday raised the death toll among Americans from five to six. Five have been identified; embassy officials gave no details on the identity of the sixth.

India and Pakistan have fought two of their three wars over Kashmir. U.S. officials are concerned about a flare-up in animosity similar to one that occurred after Pakistani militants attacked the Indian parliament in December 2001, the officials said.

Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice twice has called India’s foreign minister, along with Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari, since the crisis began.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081129/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/us_india_shooting;_
ylt=AuqkEsV_Y_BSJktIdU_XViys0NUE

Obama Camp ‘Flattered’ by Hamas Compliment as Jimmy Carter Visits

April 18, 2008

By Aaron Klein

WorldNetDaily
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Barack Obama’s campaign said yesterday it is “flattered” that Hamas’ endorsement of the Illinois senator compared him to John F. Kennedy, though it objects to any diplomatic contact with the terrorist group.“I like John Kennedy too,” said chief Obama strategist David Axelrod.

Read the rest:
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/index.php?fa=
PAGE.view&pageId=61852

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Jimmy Carter Calls on Hamas

(CBS/AP) Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter met a Hamas delegation from Gaza Thursday, part of a series of talks with the Islamic militant group that has drawn sharp criticism from U.S. and Israeli officials.

Carter spoke with Hamas officials in the West Bank Wednesday and angered Israelis when he embraced one of them. He plans to meet the group’s exiled political chief, Khaled Mashaal, in Damascus, Syria on Friday.

Read the rest:
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/04/17/
world/main4023091.shtml

 

 

Obama hit with obstacles on trail

April 18, 2008

By Christina Bellantoni and S.A. Miller
The Washington Times
April 18, 2008

PHILADELPHIA — Front-runner status brings unexpected headaches, and Sen. Barack Obama continues to show he’s not immune.
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Mr. Obama’s campaign yesterday was forced to reject an unsolicited endorsement by the Islamist terror group Hamas as the candidate worked to reassure leery Jewish voters, and his supporters derided Wednesday’s debate as unfair.

US Democratic presidential candidate Illinois Senator Barack ...
US Democratic presidential candidate Illinois Senator Barack Obama speaks during a townhall meeting at the Kerr Scott Building in Raleigh, North Carolina. Hillary Clinton and Obama set off Thursday on a five-day dash towards the Pennsylvania primary, as the endgame opens in their gruelling Democratic White House tussle.(AFP/Emmanuel Dunand)


In Pennsylvania, Mr. Obama’s prodigious fundraising is allowing him to flood the airwaves with ads to cut away rival Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton’s lead here, but voters say they can’t click the remote control without seeing the Democratic aspirant’s face — and even supporters think it’s too much.
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“Part of me says, yeah, I’m getting tired of that stuff because it’s been going on for so long but because we’re right up to the edge, I can handle it for the next couple of days,” said Jerry Bowers, an Obama volunteer from Mechanicsburg.
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Lots of ads are “part of the process,” he added.
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But a recent American Research Group (ARG) poll found 23 percent of likely voters in Pennsylvania”s primary Tuesday think the Obama ads — at least 14 different spots that have blanketed the airwaves from network news to MTV — are “excessive.” The ads promise change and outline his biography.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080418/NATION/334729180/1001

Top-tier al Qaeda leader killed

February 1, 2008

By Sara A. Carter
The Washington Times
February 1, 2008

A senior al Qaeda leader responsible for numerous attacks on American troops in Afghanistan and elsewhere was killed several days ago in Pakistan in a missile attack that an Islamist Web site blamed on the U.S.

Abu Laith al Libi is seen in an undated video grab made available ...

Abu Laith al-Libi, a known top-tier commander of al Qaeda’s combat operations in the region and No. 12 on the U.S. most-wanted list, was killed in his compound in a village about nearly 3 miles outside Mir Ali in North Waziristan. An Islamist Web site first reported al-Libi’s death, which it blamed on the U.S., saying yesterday he had been “martyred” but not describing how. The site did not say who might succeed him.
“We congratulate the Islamic nation for the martyrdom of the sheik, the lion, Abu Laith al-Libi,” said a banner which appeared in a section of the Web site.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080201/NATION/964506640/1001

World outraged, fearful over Bhutto assassination in Pakistan

December 27, 2007
By Matthew Tostevin

LONDON (Reuters) – World leaders voiced outrage at the assassination on Thursday of Pakistan‘s opposition leader Benazir Bhutto and expressed fears for the fate of the nuclear-armed state.

Bhutto

U.S. President George W. Bush condemned the killing as a “cowardly act” and urged Pakistanis to go ahead with a planned election. Russian President Vladimir Putin called it “a barbaric act of terrorism” that was a challenge to the world.

British Prime Minister Gordon Brown said Bhutto had risked everything to try and bring democracy to her country, of which Britain used to be the colonial ruler.

“The terrorists must not be allowed to kill democracy in Pakistan,” he said.

Bhutto was killed in a gun and bomb attack as she left a rally ahead of an election due on January 8. The identity of the attacker was not immediately clear, but Islamist militants have been blamed for a previous assassination bid.

“The subcontinent has lost an outstanding leader who worked for democracy and reconciliation in her country,” said Prime Minister Manmohan Singh of India, Pakistan’s giant neighbor and nuclear rival.

“The manner of her going is a reminder of the common dangers that our region faces from cowardly acts of terrorism and of the need to eradicate this dangerous threat.”

French President Nicolas Sarkozy called the killing odious.

France, like the European Union, is particularly attached to stability and democracy in Pakistan,” he said in a letter to Pakistan’s President Pervez Musharraf.

FEAR

Pakistan was already a big global worry.

The U.S. ally has been struggling to contain Islamist violence while Musharraf, whose popularity has slumped, only lifted a state of emergency on December 15 after six weeks.

Bush urged Pakistanis to honor Bhutto’s memory by continuing with the democratic process and said those behind the attack must be brought to justice.

“The United States strongly condemns this cowardly act by murderous extremists who are trying to undermine Pakistan’s democracy,” he told reporters at his Texas ranch.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said the assassination was a “heinous crime” and an “assault on stability” in Pakistan.

Jose Manuel Barroso, president of the European Union’s executive arm, the European Commission, said it was “an attack against democracy and against Pakistan.”

Police said a suicide bomber fired shots at Bhutto, 54, as she left the rally in a park in the city of Rawalpindi before blowing himself up. Police said 16 people died in the blast.

The 53-nation Commonwealth, which suspended Pakistan over the emergency rule declaration, said the assassination was “a dark day for Pakistan and the Commonwealth.”

Saudi King Abdullah said the attackers were “wicked murderers who are distant from Islam and morals.”

Iran‘s foreign ministry condemned the attack and urged calm and stability in Pakistan.

A Vatican spokesman said Pope Benedict had been informed, adding:

“It is difficult to see any glimmer of hope, peace, reconciliation in this country.”

Musharraf: He’s The Best Hope That Was Available At the Moment

November 6, 2007

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
November 6, 2007

Let’s face it: if anyone in the government of the United States of America ever though President General Pervez Musharraf was dedicated to a future democratic Pakistan, he was naïve, stupid or smoking some illegal substance.

Just try to name one other U.S. ally ever who wanted to be called “President General.”
Photo

Musharraf is and always has been a military man.  He came to power in a coup. And he is a strong man holding together a rats nest of Islamic extremists, militants and terrorists. In Pakistan, the question isn’t “Are these guys bad guys?” The more appropriate question almost always is, “Who’s side are these bad guys on?”

I have been into and out of Pakistan a few times assisting people battling the Taliban and other terrorists. It is not a pretty place to “vacation,” as my friend Mike dubbed my sojourns today.

And I have always questioned the full-throttled support for Musharraf that the U.S. has proclaimed.  And the support is not just words: it amounts to about $130 million (USD) every month.

On NBC’s “Meet the Press” with Tim Russert on Sunday, September 10, 2006, Vice President Dick Cheney expressed such strong U.S. Government support for President general Musharraf of Pakistan – that I thought at the time the words were clearly over the top. Mr. Cheney expressed U.S. support for Musharraf as follows:

“President Musharraf has been a great ally. There was, prior to 9/11, a close relationship between the Pakistan intelligence services and the Taliban. Pakistan was one of only three nations that recognized, diplomatically recognized the government of Afghanistan at that particular time. But the fact is Musharraf has put his neck on the line in order to be effective in going after the extremist elements including al-Qaeda and including the Taliban in Pakistan. There have been three attempts on his life, two of those by al-Qaeda over the course of the last three years. This is a man who has demonstrated great courage under very difficult political circumstances and has been a great ally for the United States”.

“So there’s no question in that area along the Afghan/Pakistan border is something of a no man’s land, it has been for centuries. It’s extraordinarily rough territory. People there who move back and forth across the border, they were smuggling goods before there was concern about, about terrorism. But we need to continue to work the problem. Musharraf just visited Karzai in, in Kabul this past week, they’re both going to be here during the course of the U.N. General Assembly meetings over the course of the next few weeks. We worked that area very hard, and the Paks have been great allies in that effort.”

“Pakistan, we’ve gone in and worked closely with Musharraf to take down al-Qaeda. Saudi Arabia, same thing. In all of those cases, it’s been a matter of getting the locals into the fight to prevail over al-Qaeda and al-Qaeda-related tyrants.”

“Think of Musharraf who puts his neck on the line every day he goes to work, when there’ve been attempts on his life because of his support for our position. And they look over here and they see the United States that’s made a commitment to the Iraqis, that’s gone in and taken down the old regime, worked to set up a democracy, worked to set up security forces, and all of a sudden we say it’s too tough, we’re going home. What’s Karzai going to think up in Kabul? Is he going to have any confidence at all that he can trust the United States, that in fact we’re there to get the job done? What about Musharraf? Or is Musharraf and those people you’re talking about who are on the fence in Afghanistan and elsewhere going to say, ‘My gosh, the United States hasn’t got the stomach for the fight. Bin Laden’s right, al-Qaeda’s right, the United States has lost its will and will not complete the mission,’ and it will damage our capabilities and all of those other war fronts, if you will, in the global war on terror.”

Have you ever heard any President or Vice President of the United States express such unbridled support for anyone at any time?

I think not.

So why did Musharraf get the full trust and confidence of the United States – and billions of dollars? Because he was in power on 9-11 and we were in no position to invade Iraq, Afghanistan AND Pakistan. Pakistan at least had a ruler that didn’t drop gas on his own people, the way Saddam used gas on the Kurds.

So, Musharraf was a guy we were stuck with: not the guy we chose to take to the dance.

It rankles me some that Mr. Cheney felt he had to so obviously oversell this lemon. I wish he had just said: “Musharraf will never give us democracy in Pakistan. But he might keep the various factions from creating total chaos.”

Today Musharraf said he would still hold democratic elections in January. That, my friends, is happy talk nobody in Pakistan believes. Musharraf is holding on for dear life. And it is uncertain if he’ll still be above ground in January. If he is it will be because many of his enemies disappear without a trace.

Now we may be on the brink of total chaos in Pakistan and the U.S. can do little but stand on the sidelines like a deer in the headlights.

But it looks like we already decided to stay with the gal we’re dancing with. As long as she can do it.

Thousands battle Pakistani police

November 5, 2007

By MUNIR AHMAD, Associated Press Writer

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan – Police fired tear gas and battered thousands of lawyers protesting President Gen. Pervez Musharraf‘s decision to impose emergency rule, as Western allies threatened to review aid to the troubled Muslim nation. More than 1,500 people have been arrested in 48 hours, and authorities put a stranglehold on independent media.

Musharraf, who took power in a 1999 coup and is also head of Pakistan‘s army, suspended the constitution on Saturday ahead of a Supreme Court ruling on whether his re-election as president was legal. He ousted independent-minded judges, stripped media freedoms and granted sweeping powers to authorities to crush dissent.

Read the rest:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071105/ap_on_re_as/pakistan;_
ylt=AteXKoAF.IQrkGRfN4DabPqs0NUE