Archive for the ‘invest’ Category

Warren Buffett’s Advice During Global Financial Crisis

October 17, 2008

By Warren Buffett
The New York Times
.
THE financial world is a mess, both in the United States and abroad. Its problems, moreover, have been leaking into the general economy, and the leaks are now turning into a gusher. In the near term, unemployment will rise, business activity will falter and headlines will continue to be scary.

So … I’ve been buying American stocks. This is my personal account I’m talking about, in which I previously owned nothing but United States government bonds. (This description leaves aside my Berkshire Hathaway holdings, which are all committed to philanthropy.) If prices keep looking attractive, my non-Berkshire net worth will soon be 100 percent in United States equities.

Why?

A simple rule dictates my buying: Be fearful when others are greedy, and be greedy when others are fearful. And most certainly, fear is now widespread, gripping even seasoned investors. To be sure, investors are right to be wary of highly leveraged entities or businesses in weak competitive positions. But fears regarding the long-term prosperity of the nation’s many sound companies make no sense. These businesses will indeed suffer earnings hiccups, as they always have. But most major companies will be setting new profit records 5, 10 and 20 years from now.
|

Democratic White House hopeful Barack Obama and his Republican ...
Democratic White House hopeful Barack Obama and his Republican rival John McCain Tuesday agreed that one of the world’s richest men, Warren Buffett, pictured in May, would make a good treasury secretary.(AFP/DDP/File/Thomas Lohnes)

Let me be clear on one point: I can’t predict the short-term movements of the stock market. I haven’t the faintest idea as to whether stocks will be higher or lower a month — or a year — from now. What is likely, however, is that the market will move higher, perhaps substantially so, well before either sentiment or the economy turns up. So if you wait for the robins, spring will be over.

A little history here: During the Depression, the Dow hit its low, 41, on July 8, 1932. Economic conditions, though, kept deteriorating until Franklin D. Roosevelt took office in March 1933. By that time, the market had already advanced 30 percent. Or think back to the early days of World War II, when things were going badly for the United States in Europe and the Pacific. The market hit bottom in April 1942, well before Allied fortunes turned. Again, in the early 1980s, the time to buy stocks was when inflation raged and the economy was in the tank. In short, bad news is an investor’s best friend. It lets you buy a slice of America’s future at a marked-down price.

Over the long term, the stock market news will be good. In the 20th century, the United States endured two world wars and other traumatic and expensive military conflicts; the Depression; a dozen or so recessions and financial panics; oil shocks; a flu epidemic; and the resignation of a disgraced president. Yet the Dow rose from 66 to 11,497.

Read the rest:
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/17/opinion
/17buffett.html?scp=4&sq=buffett&st=cse

**********************************************

Buffett’s Buying!

(Reuters) – Billionaire investor Warren Buffett is buying U.S. stocks, he wrote in an opinion column in the New York Times.

“A simple rule dictates my buying: Be fearful when others are greedy, and be greedy when others are fearful,” Buffett wrote in the paper.

Buffett acknowledged the economic news was bad, with the financial world in a mess, unemployment rising and business activity faltering.

“What is likely, however, is that the market will move higher, perhaps substantially so, well before either sentiment or the economy turns up,” he said. “So if you wait for the robins, spring will be over.”

Billionaire financier and Berkshire Hathaway Chief Executive ... 
Billionaire financier and Berkshire Hathaway Chief Executive Warren Buffett greets shareholders during the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Shareholders meeting in Omaha, Nebraska in this May 3, 2008 file photo.(Carlos Barria/Reuters)

Buffett, who made his money by building his company Berkshire Hathaway Inc (BRKa.N)(BRKb.N) into a $199 billion conglomerate, wrote that investors were right to be wary of highly leveraged entities or businesses in weak competitive positions.

“But fears regarding the long-term prosperity of the nation’s many sound companies make no sense,” he said.

Buffett said major companies would suffer earnings hiccups, but added they “will be setting new profit records five, 10 and 20 years from now.”