Archive for the ‘ICBM’ Category

Russia To Launch 13 Ballistic Missiles

November 29, 2008

Russia will further test its ballistic capabilities through launching an increased number of missiles over the next year, an official says.

“We are planning to carry out 13 launches in 2009,” Nikolai Solovtsov, commander of Russia’s Strategic Missile Forces (SMF), said Friday.

The test-fires, which compared to 2008 are almost double in number, include “five test launches of new missiles” and “three launches to confirm the extension of missiles’ service lives” according to the commander Solovtsov.

Among the missiles to be test-fired is the cutting-edge RS-24 intercontinental ballistic missiles fitted with multiple independently-targetable re-entry vehicle (MIRV) warheads.

MIRV warheads enable the hardware hit a various number of targets while empowering it with the capability to shear through multiple layers of armor.

The missile is said to guarantee the strike capability of the Russian missile triad for almost 50 years.

Moscow’s missile might is receiving undivided attention amid Washington’s plans to deploy 10 missile interceptors in Poland and a radar system the Czech Republic near the Russian borders.

HN/MMN
Turkish Press

Minuteman3launch.jpg
A U.S. ICBM is launched from California

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Russia Says It Needs New Missiles Due To U.S. Missile Shield Plan

November 28, 2008

Russia’s military said on Friday it had intensified efforts to develop new ballistic missiles in response to U.S. plans to deploy an anti-missile system in Europe and Russia’s navy test fired a new generation rocket.

Soldiers in historical uniforms take part in a military parade ... 
Soldiers in historical uniforms take part in a military parade in the Red Square in Moscow, November 7, 2008.(Denis Sinyakov/Reuters)

The decision by the United States to deploy interceptor missiles in Poland and a radar system in the Czech Republic has angered Moscow, which says Russia’s national security will be compromised by the U.S. anti-missile system.

By Conor Sweeney, Reuters

Colonel-General Nikolai Solovtsov, Commander of Russia‘s Strategic Missile Forces, was quoted by Interfax as saying that Russia had bolstered its efforts to develop new missiles.

“At the present time, work has been intensified to create the research and technical foundation for new missile systems, which will be needed after 2020,” Solovtsov said.

A few hours later, the Dmitry Donskoy nuclear submarine launched a Bulava intercontinental ballistic missile from the White Sea, a navy spokesman said. The missile hit the Kura testing site on the Kamchatka peninsula in the Pacific.

Russia's President Dmitry Medvedev visits cosmodrome Plesetsk, ... 
Russia’s President Dmitry Medvedev visits cosmodrome Plesetsk, which is nestled among the taiga forests of Russia’s north, October 12, 2008.REUTERS/RIA Novosti/Kremlin/Dmitry Astakhov

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http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20081128/ts_nm/us_russia_missiles_
usa;_ylt=Am0dTWEn0f8aRVaHCDXmn3Os0NUE

Russia test-fires intercontinental missile: military

November 26, 2008

Russia on Wednesday test-fired for the third time its new RS-24 intercontinental ballistic missile aimed at overcoming air defence systems, the military said.

“The test-firing of the RS-24 was carried out on Wednesday from the Plesetsk cosmodrome” in the Arkhangelsk region of northern Russia, the Interfax news agency reported.

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev walks past an RS-12M ballistic ... 
Russian President Dmitry Medvedev walks past an RS-12M ballistic missile. Russia has test-fired for the third time its new RS-24 intercontinental ballistic missile aimed at overcoming air defence systems.(AFP/RIA Novosti/File/Dmitry Astakhov)

Military spokesman Alexei Zolotukhin told the agency that “the missile… was launched from a mobile launcher. This is the third test firing of the RS-24 in the last two years.”

Russia in May 2007 first test-fired the RS-24, which the military has said is designed to overcome air-defence systems such as the controversial US missile shield planned for deployment in eastern Europe.

–AFP

European Missile Defense: Assessing Iran’s ICBM Capabilities

October 14, 2008

This is a very personal issue for us as we were involved in discussing the threat to Europe and the need for missile defense starting around 1990….
Though we disagree with much of what the Arms Control Association says, we always find some food for thought…..

From The Arms Control Association

In 1999 and 2001, the National Intelligence Council stated that Iran could develop an ICBM capable of reaching the United States by 2015. In recent years, U.S. government agencies have affirmed those estimates, arguing that “Iran could have long-range missiles capable of reaching the U.S. and Europe before 2015” and that “proposed U.S. missile defense assets in Europe would defend the U.S. and much of Europe against long-range ballistic missile threats launched from the Middle East.”[1]  Accordingly, Washington intends to build a missile defense system in Europe by around 2012.

Can Iran field an ICBM capable of striking the United States by 2012? Iran has more than a decade of experience with developing single-stage, short-range and medium-range missiles that can reach neighboring countries and Israel. It has yet to demonstrate a capability for a longer-range missile, although within a few years it may have the means to develop and deploy a 3,000-4,000-kilometer-range missile that can strike western Europe. Iran would find it difficult, though, to field a 10,000-kilometer-range ICBM that can strike the United States by 2012-2015 unless North Korea or another country successfully develops and tests such a system and transfers it to Iran. Even with such foreign assistance, it would likely take Tehran several additional years of development and testing before it could produce and deploy a modest number of such missiles.

Iran’s Missile Programs

Iran initially sought ballistic missiles during its war with Iraq, when hundreds of Iraqi missiles struck Iranian cities. Tehran’s missile program then developed in several phases. From the mid-1980s to mid-1990s, Iran purchased 300-kilometer-range Scud-B and 600-kilometer-range Scud-C missiles from North Korea, and it also indigenously assembled and built Scuds. Then Iran developed the single-stage, liquid-fuel Shahab-3 missile. This approximately 16-metric-ton missile has a range of 1,300 kilometers with a 750-kilogram payload and is derived from North Korea’s Nodong missile. The Shahab-3 was first flight-tested in July 1998 and reportedly completed its development test series after its sixth flight in July 2003.[2]

Since the turn of the century, Iran has pursued a number of other missile projects, although it has not yet flight-tested a new medium-range or long-range ballistic missile. One project involves modifications to the Shahab-3. In August 2004, Iran tested a Shahab-3 with a bulbous nose cone reportedly capable of accommodating a nuclear warhead.[3] In August 2005, Iran stated that it had increased the range of the Shahab-3 to 2,000 kilometers. Iran again tested the Shahab-3 in January 2006 and May 2006, and the January 2006 test may have involved a more advanced North Korean Nodong-B missile…..

Read the rest:
http://www.armscontrol.org/act/2007_10/Mistry

Moscow’s Missile Gambit

March 13, 2008

 By Robert Joseph and J.D. Crouch II
The Washington Post
Thursday, March 13, 2008; Page A17

Six years ago, President Bush announced the U.S. withdrawal from the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty and our intention to deploy defenses against emerging threats from countries such as North Korea and Iran. Contrary to prevailing expectations, the sky did not fall. Moscow’s response, delivered in a statement by President Vladimir Putin, expressed disagreement with the U.S. decision but emphasized that U.S. defenses were not a threat to Russia and that Russia would make major reductions in its strategic offensive forces — a striking rebuke to the myth that ending the ABM Treaty would lead to an arms race.
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Today, the United States and Russia find themselves in opposition on the issue of deploying 10 missile interceptors and supporting radar to Europe — an act of much less strategic consequence than abandonment of the ABM Treaty. Bush and his national security team have explained the concept, in considerable detail, to Russia’s national security elite. Moscow objects by citing a threat to its own deterrent (an argument it knows has no merit) and the stationing of American forces near its borders (which reminds it of the painful loss of empire) and denies the existence of an Iranian missile threat.
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Russia’s stance reflects its increasing assertiveness as a major player on the international scene, helped by the price of its energy exports. Moscow is eager to regain its great-power status and thinks the path to success requires painting the United States as the threat. The United States, as a prominent former Russian official once told us, is the threat Russians love to hate.
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With equal determination, the Bush administration has sought to change Russian perspectives. Over five years, the United States has made proposal after proposal to work with Russia’s military and industry on missile defense. We have both been involved in these initiatives, offering modest cooperative activities, such as activation of a joint early-warning center, and projects that would be more technically, and politically, challenging. Each time cooperation has been deflected or rejected. Russia’s offer of the use of its radar in Azerbaijan, for example, came with a string attached — that the United States forgo building an interceptor site in Europe.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/03/12/AR2008031203394.html

Cheney says US needs missile defense

March 12, 2008
By TOM RAUM, Associated Press Writer 

WASHINGTON – Borrowing a theme from the presidential contest, Vice President Dick Cheney said Tuesday that the possibility of a 3 a.m. emergency call to the White House is all the more reason for the next commander in chief to follow through on President Bush‘s plans for a national missile defense.

Vice President Dick Cheney speaks at a Heritage Foundation Dinner ...
Vice President Dick Cheney speaks at a Heritage Foundation Dinner commemorating the 25th Anniversary of President Ronald Reagan’s Strategic Defense Initiative Proposal on Tuesday, March 11, 2008, in Washington.
(AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke)


“It’s plain to see that the world around us gives ample reason to continue working on missile defense,” Cheney told the conservative Heritage Foundation at a dinner recognizing the 25th anniversary of President Reagan’s Strategic Defense Initiative, a proposed network of rockets capable of shooting down incoming intercontinental ballistic missiles.
Bush has set in motion a more modest version of Reagan’s original plan.

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http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080312/ap_on_go_
pr_wh/cheney;_ylt=AglCCh7o4m
CMMlNL_Cstelms0NUE

Russia successfully tests new ICBM

December 25, 2007
By VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV, Associated Press Writer

MOSCOW – Russia’s military on Tuesday successfully test-fired a new intercontinental ballistic missile capable of carrying multiple nuclear warheads — a weapon intended to replace aging Soviet-era missiles.

The RS-24 missile was launched from the Plesetsk launch facility in northern Russia and its test warheads successfully hit designated targets on the Kura testing range on the Kamchatka Peninsula some 4,340 miles east, Strategic Missile Forces spokesman Alexander Vovk told The Associated Press.

Vovk said that the missile carried multiple test warheads, but refused to….

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http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071225/ap_on_re_eu/russia_new_
missile;_ylt=AquY7hSe.g.71jm4zhHycCas0NUE