Archive for the ‘Hugo Chavez’ Category

Obama White House Potential Tinder Box

November 8, 2008

We all wish Barack Obama well.  We hope and pray for the future of America.  As my Dad used to say, “Whatever happens in America, whoever we elect, the Republic will survive.”

My Dad lived through great crises and achievements in America: sleeping in the U.S. Capitol building on December 7, 1941 following the devestating attack on Pearl Harbor that day.

Barack Obama’s White House, which in some ways started on election day and some say started even before that, will legally begin upon the swearing in of Vice President Joe Biden and Barack Obama himself as President of the United States on January 20, 2009.

Barack Obama’s White House has every potential to become a tinderbox of controversey, missteps and overreaching.  Here’s why:

-Hubris:  There have been many jokes, cartoons and other side remarks about “Barack the Messiah.”  The loftly language of Candidate Obama, Senator Obama, Professor Obama and now President Elect Obama lends itself to what I’ll call “uplift;” or a sense of loftiness.  It also lends itself to self-importance and ridicule.  President Obama, while being careful and measured and lofty might just end up sounding not presidential but sanctimonious.  This will be devestating on the world stage already filled with bufoons like Hugo Chavez and Mr. Ahmadinejad of Iran.  And just as Italy’s Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi referred to Barack Obama’s great “tan” and the world media seemed to say “there he goes again,” Mr. Obama’s now highly admired lofty tone can become the fodder for comedians overnight, if he isn’t careful.

President-elect Senator Barack Obama gives his victory speech ...
Above: President-elect Barack Obama

Gaffes:  Joe Biden has a well earned reputation as a gaffe machine.  But Team Obam has had him on a tight leash and nailed to a teleprompter.  But that can’t last.  Before long, the media will be saying, in all liklihood, “Say it isn’t so, Joe.”  And Vice President Biden won’t be the only one to make a gaffe, if history is any guide.  Remember Ronald reagan caught off-mike before a news confernce saying someing about bombing the Soviet Union?  Oops. 

Vice President-elect Joe Biden listens as President-elect Obama ...
Vice President-elect Joe Biden listens as President-elect Obama answers questions during a news conference in Chicago, Friday, Nov. 7, 2008.(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)


Everone has their slip ups.  Witness Barack Obama trying to make some fun during his first press conference by referring to Nancy Reagan and her “seances.”  Say it isn’t so, Barack.  You just got your facts wrong in what conservatives see as an attack on a dead “sainted” conservative president’s wife who is elderly and ill.  Not funny, Barack (Obama phoned Mrs. Reagan to say he was sorry).

Partisanship:  Our advice: Put America first and be bi-partisan in all things.  That’s patriotic.  If you just want to be a realist: keep your enemies close so you can watch them, Barack.  That’s what Abraham Lincoln said and did.  “Keep your friends close and your enemies closer.”  Lincoln filled his cabinet and his kitchen cabinet with the opposition: he had a civil war to win.  The result was emancipation and union.  I fear, after the selection of Rahm Emanuel, who Paul Begala said was partisan “cross between a hemorrhoid and a toothache,” we could wind up with not “snakes on a plane” but “vipers in the White House.”  We hope the new White House denizens can reach out in good will and not to throttle others by the neck.  Won’t work.

White House Chief of Staff-designate Rahm Emanuel listens during ... 
White House Chief of Staff-designate Rahm Emanuel listens during a news conference by President-elect Obama in Chicago, Friday, Nov. 7, 2008.(AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

So, not to rain on anyone’s parade, as a veteran of Washington some many years, I thought I’d raise the flag of caution and good will — which usually serve those in power much better than “Sherman though Atlanta.”

Sherman would have loved Rahm Emanuel.  And Obama picked him.

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
Wakefield Chapel, Virginia

Boeing, USAF Tankers and Due Diligence

March 13, 2008

By James Lyons
The Washington Times
March 13, 2008

The announcement that the U.S. Air Force chose the Northrop-Grumman-EADS team to build 179 tanker aircraft at initial procurement costs of $40 billion should have come as no surprise to anyone following the competition.

KC-135R refuels an F-22A Raptor

Studies last year showed the Northrop-EADS KC-30 tanker had distinct operational advantages. Loren B. Thompson, a defense consultant at the Lexington Institute, said Northrop-EADS KC-30 bested Boeing’s 767 tanker version in four of five categories, adding that Northrop’s winning bid was not a close call.
Heads should roll at Boeing….
.
Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/article/20080313/
COMMENTARY/199537619/1012

Venezuela says mobilizes forces to Colombia border

March 5, 2008
By Brian Ellsworth

CARACAS (Reuters) – Venezuela said it deployed tanks and air and sea forces toward the Colombian border on Wednesday in its first major military mobilization of a crisis raising fears for regional stability.

Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez speaks to supporters during ...
Venezuala’s Hugo ChavezThe action escalated tensions over Colombia‘s weekend raid inside another South American neighbor, Ecuador, to kill rebels in an operation that Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, an ally of leftist Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa, says could spark war.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080305/wl_nm/venezuela_colombia_dc;_
ylt=AhBLcZfgCZos0q0lxGft39Ks0NUE

 

U.S. foes target Latin America

February 8, 2008

By Sara A. Carter
The Washington Times
February 8, 2008

Iran, Cuba and Venezuela are working together against the U.S. by undermining democracy in Latin America, allowing trafficking of illegal drugs and creating safe havens for extremist groups, intelligence officials said.
.
Testifying before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence on Tuesday, National Intelligence Director Michael McConnell said that influence from the three countries — led respectively by Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez — has spilled into Bolivia, Nicaragua and Ecuador, which “are pursuing agendas that undercut checks and balances” of democratic governments.

Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez salutes during a military ...
 Venezuela’s President Hugo Chavez salutes during a military parade to celebrate the 16th anniversary of a failed coup d’etat led by him in 1992, in Valencia, 160 km (99 miles) from Caracas, February 4, 2008.(Ho-Miraflores Palace/Reuters)


“Moreover, each of these governments, to varying degrees, has engaged in sharply anti-U.S. rhetoric, aligned with Venezuela and Cuba — and increasingly Iran — on international issues, and advocated measures that directly clash with U.S. initiatives,” said Mr. McConnell, whose department oversees all 16 U.S. intelligence agencies.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080208/NATION/169452279/1001
Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, center, surrounded by ... 
Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, center, surrounded by officials, stands under a research rocket, in Tehran, Iran, Monday, Feb. 4, 2008. Iran launched a research rocket Monday and unveiled its first major space center that will be used to launch research satellites, state-run television reported.(AP Photo/ISNA, Mehdi Ghasemi)

U.S. Economy: Storm Warning

November 21, 2007

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
November 21, 2007

We see definite storm warnings ahead for the U.S. economy. Nobody wants to say the “R” word (HUSH: recession) or the “I” word (inflation), but there are at least five major interrelated factors at play that negatively impact the real or perceived strength of the U.S. economy in the near term.

Gas prices: They are going up and this impacts everyone. Filling the tank for commuting, job hunting or hauling sheet rock; it doesn’t matter the reason; is costing us all more with no end in sight. And everything you buy and touch from the groceries to the new microwave take part of their journey by truck. World-wide demand is up with China showing an unquenchable thirst for oil. Any chance that OPEC will increase production to bring down the price? If you were an Emir, would you?

Loss of value in the dollar: This is no time to hold dollars. During the last week of October, the dollar hit long-term lows against the euro, the British pound and the Canadian dollar. Fears that overseas investors and countries, especially China which holds over a trillion dollars in foreign exchange reserves, could sell or convert their dollar holdings have depressed the dollar.

Suddenly the euro is hot.

Even Supermodel Gisele Bündchen, the 27 year old Brazilian bombshell who made $30 million last year, decided apparently that she’d rather be paid in euros from now on.

Ms. Bündchen appears to be the “girlfriend” of New England Patriots star quarterback Tom Brady. Now if HE elects to be paid in euros, I am moving to Canada. Or maybe Brazil if my wife lets me!

Housing, credit and construction: Slower economic growth, largely driven by a lingering housing slump and a related credit squeeze; is already putting thousands of workers out of work. We expect fewer new home starts for the foreseeable future. The trickle down impact of this? Lost jobs in all the building trades from the carpenter to the master electrician. Fewer new refrigerator sales. Fewer new sofas sold. Sobbing realtors. Just as the cost of oil impacts the cost of your groceries and microwave, so too is a slowdown in new home starts likely put many home decorators, carpet stores and furniture outlets on the skids.

Inflation in China: China’s consumer prices shot up 6.5% in October vs. a year earlier. August levels were at a ten year high. Food prices in China are skyrocketing. This is putting pressure on employers to pay more. Higher worker pay will drive up the prices of China’s notoriously inexpensive goods. Inflation in China will mean increased cost for those low cost Chinese goodies you buy. What goodies do we mean? Just about every product you shop for in the Target, WalMart, Sears and elsewhere. We’re talking about higher prices for clothing, toys, steel and other products China exports. If China’s exports get pricier, that would feed into U.S. inflation through a hike in the cost of imported goods.

For the U.S. and other countries, China’s inflation bears watching. That’s because China has played a big role in easing global inflation by manufacturing low-cost goods.

American jobs: We sometimes wonder if the American job scene of 1960 was better or worse than the job outlook today. Fewer highly paid union jobs with full benefits and medical coverage exist today. Ask any automotive worker. The service industry is burgeoning: but these jobs are low paying. The average clerk at Sears gets paid $8-$10 an hour. Building security personnel, without a firearm, earn about $10 an hour. In a 40 hour week, these folks earn about $400, with little or no benefits and no medical coverage. Cleaners, sweepers and the like may earn less. And, in an insidious use of legal procedure, many employers only let employees work for 38 hours per week. By stopping the employee short of a 40 hour week, the employer has no legal requirement to pay any benefits. So we expect pressure will build to raise worker pay and increase benefits, especially medical care.

Loss of U.S. influence and prestige: The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have meant a diminished stature for the U.S. worldwide. This has emboldened China, Russia, North Korea and others. Currently, President General Musharraf seems in defiance of the U.S. Even Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez is emboldened by this factor, real or imagined, and has declared his own war of defiance against the U.S.

The Washington Post’s columnist Anne Applebaum wrote in “Collateral Damage,” on November 20, 2007, “the collateral damage inflicted by the war on America’s relationships with the rest of the world is a lot deeper and broader than most Americans have realized. It isn’t just that the Iraq war invigorated the anti-Americanism that has always been latent pretty much everywhere. What’s worse is the fact that — however it all comes out in the end, however successful Iraqi democracy is a decade from now — our conduct of the war has disillusioned our natural friends and supporters and thrown a lasting shadow over our military and political competence. However it all comes out, the price we’ve paid is too high.”

And the price in prestige and respect impacts the cost of the dollar.

While we always think the glass is half full; and we fully ascribe to Abraham Lincoln’s optimism just before the first officially decreed Thanksgiving in 1863, we do believe that there are some dark clouds building on the horizon for the U.S. economy.

https://johnibii.wordpress.com/2007/11/20/chinas-growing-inflation-woes-could-spur-price-hikes-in-us/

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7078612.stm

https://johnibii.wordpress.com/2007/11/21/ailing-dollar-falls-to-historic-low-against-euro/

https://johnibii.wordpress.com/2007/11/15/americas-first-thanksgiving/

Oil prices rise to new record in Asia

Re-election Strategy or New Cold War?

October 25, 2007

By James Hackett
For Peace and Freedom
October 25, 2007

The question in Washington and European capitals this fall is whether Moscow’s aggressive behavior is the onset of a new Cold War or just a gambit to win votes in upcoming elections. The central issue is the future of Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Russia’s hard-earned democracy is rapidly morphing back into an authoritarian state under President Putin, who is eager to stay in power. He probably could scrap the constitution and become president for life, but has said he will not do that. More likely, he plans to put a puppet in the presidency and rule from behind the scenes or as prime minister, and then run for president again in 2012.

Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin
Владимир Владимирович Путин
Vladimir Putin

The Russian constitution adopted in 1993 states in Chapter 4, Article 81, “No one person shall hold the office of president for more than two terms in succession.” Mr. Putin was elected in 2000 and won reelection with a 71 percent landslide in 2004. He will complete two terms in 2008, so is ineligible under the constitution to run next year, but could run in 2012 or later.

Elections to the Duma will be held on December 2, after which the political parties will nominate their candidates for president. That election will be March 2, with the new president taking office May 7. Less than six months before the election Vladimir Putin stands astride Russian politics like a colossus, with polls showing an approval rate as high as 80 percent.

Videos have been released showing Mr. Putin in campaign mode, a vigorous 55, horseback riding and fishing. For months he has been taking step after step to appeal to the majority of Russians who yearn for a return to the great power status their country lost when the Soviet Union collapsed. He is taking advantage of the booming global market for energy, renationalizing the oil and gas industry and using the proceeds to rebuild Russia’s military.

For years, Russia has been developing the Topol-M mobile ballistic missile, the Bulava submarine-launched ballistic missile, a new multiple-warhead missile, a new evading warhead, the S-400 missile interceptor, fifth-generation fighter planes and four new missile-firing submarines. Progress was slow and funds scarce, but the recent surge in oil and gas wealth has made it possible to expand and accelerate these programs.

Now Mr. Putin is using his improving military to throw his weight around, confronting countries from Georgia to Norway. He has resumed long-range nuclear bomber flights, opposes missile defenses in Europe, claims the North Pole for Russia and suspends cooperation under the Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE) treaty. He also sells air defense missiles to Syria and nuclear technology to Iran, suspends gas and oil shipments to pressure other countries, and threatens both to withdraw from the Intermediate Nuclear forces (INF) treaty and to target NATO countries by basing missiles in Russia’s Kaliningrad enclave.

Instead of joining Europe and America against the threat of militant Islam, Mr. Putin has joined with China, Iran and other authoritarian regimes against the West. All this appears to be fine with most Russians. A poll by the Yuri-Levada Institute found that 68 percent of Russians said their top priority was security. Democracy was hardly mentioned. Other results showed that 75 percent consider Russia a Eurasian state, while only 10 percent see themselves part of the West.

Mr. Putin could decide to emulate his friend, Venezuela’s President Hugo Chavez, and make himself president for life. Amending the Russian constitution requires large majorities in both the Federation Council and Duma, which he probably could get from those rubber-stamp bodies, but it would require compomises he may not want to make. Instead, he probably will handpick a temporary successor.

Until a few weeks ago, First Deputy Prime Minister Sergei Ivanov, a former KGB officer and recent defense minister, was considered the most likely choice. But he could be a strong leader and Mr. Putin may prefer to name a more subservient caretaker for one term. That could explain why he recently chose Viktor Zubkov, a loyal 66-year old nonentity, to be prime minister. Mr. Zubkov may also be Mr. Putin’s choice to keep the president’s seat warm until he can legally return to that office in 2012.

The bluster from Moscow could be just a run-up to the elections, to show voters President Putin takes a hard line toward foreign powers he claims are encroaching on Russia’s borders. This xenophobic anti-West foreign policy seems very popular in Russia. It may also reflect a resurgence of Cold War thinking by Mr. Putin and his ex-KGB colleagues, who spent decades confronting the West.

Whether we are in for a brief pre-election spell of Russian aggressiveness or a long-term struggle with a new anti-Western axis led by Moscow and Beijing remains to be seen. We will have a better idea next spring, when Russia chooses its next president.

James Hackett is a former national security official who now lives and writes in Carlsbad, Calif.  He is a frequent contributor to the Washington Times and other national journals and newspapers.

Related:

The Problem of Putin

Putin Digs In

Cold War Redux?

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad: Big Disappointment

September 24, 2007

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
September 25, 2007

There are no gays in Iran, the International Atomic Energy Agency says Iran’s nuclear program is for peaceful purposes, and the Holocaust never happened.

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad might actually believe these false claims but almost nobody else does.

Ahmadinejad doubts the official U.S. version of 9/11. He sounds like someone who thought Harry Potter and Peter Pan were real.

Yet he wanted to visit “Ground Zero.”  If the spot marks no actual place of historic import: why visit?

Mr. Ahmadinejad also thinks he lives in a democracy. That is because he holds power in a viciously brutal regime that has no inkling of human rights, rights for women or gay rights.  In Iran, the rights do not exist for those not in the leadership or the cream of society.

In Iran guys like Ahmadinejad and Islamic Mullah’s call the shots.  You want in?

Columbia University president Lee Bollinger said Mr. Ahmadinejad is “a petty and cruel dictator.”

Mr. Ahmadinejad used the Socratic method to question some other truths of history.

On September 11, 2001: “Why did this happen? What caused it? What conditions led to it?  Who truly was involved? Who was really involved and put it all together?”

Brilliant: except questions are not argument and certainly fall way short of facts, proof and truth: things with which the president of Iran has only a limited familiarity.

Free speech was preserved even as Ahmadinejad criticized the United States for spying on its own citizens and neglecting free speech on Monday at Columbia University.

To put this all in an academic nutshell (something Mr. Ahmadinejad might be familiar with as he was at one time a professor): Ahmadinejad: C-. Bollinger and Columbia University: A-.

Mr. Bollinger said Mr. Ahmadinejad’s denial of the Holocaust might fool the illiterate and ignorant. But not the knowledgeable and educated.

“When you come to a place like this it makes you simply ridiculous,” Bollinger said.

Thank God General Dwight David Eisenhower and others who saw into the future to this day and gave us a vast photographic and documentary record of the Holocaust.

“The truth is that the Holocaust is the most documented event in human history,” said President Bollinger.

Thank God Israel continues to work on its own security and military forces, including an airstrike against Syrian nuclear facilities just more than a week ago.

And thank God for free speech. It exposes imbeciles like Ahmadinejad, allows the educated and informed to air and debate their views in an orderly manner, and it keeps our democracy alive.

Where is it in this world is free speech stifled? Iran, North Korea, China, Vietnam, Myanmar, Thailand, Cuba and Venezuela to name a few.

Any volunteers to live under the restrictions of Hugo Chavez or Hu Jintao or Mahmoud Ahmadinejad?

Those student from Columbia University who cheered Mr. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad: we appreciate your right to believe what you will. But for tickets to China or Cuba or Venezuela or Iran: step to the head of the line. You are welcome to them.

Related:
Ahmadinejad denies 9/11, Holocaust

Ahmadinejad seeks to soothe critics

Harry Potter: More Worthless Pop Culture

Permanent President Putin?

September 5, 2007

James T. Hackett
The Washington Times
September 4, 2007

Russia may be a democracy, but it is rapidly morphing back into an authoritarian state. President Vladimir Putin looks very much like a man running for re-election. The question is whether he plans to scrap the constitution and become president for life or rule from behind the scenes and return to office later.

The constitution adopted in 1993 by the new Russia states in Chapter 4, Article 81, “No one person shall hold the office of president for more than two terms in succession.” Mr. Putin was elected in 2000 and won re-election by a landslide 71 percent in 2004. He will complete two terms next year, so is ineligible under the constitution to stand for re-election.

Elections to the Duma will be held Dec. 2, after which the political parties will nominate their candidates for the presidency. That election will take place March 2, with the new president taking office May 7. Barely six months before the election, Vladimir Putin dominates Russian politics like a colossus, with polls showing an approval rate as high as 80 percent.

Videos have been released showing Mr. Putin in campaign mode, a vigorous 55, horseback riding and fishing, stripped to the waist. For months he has taken step after step to appeal to the majority of Russians who yearn for a return to the great-power status their country lost when the Soviet Union collapsed. He has been taking advantage of the booming global market for energy, renationalizing the oil and gas industry and using the proceeds to rebuild the Russian military.

For years Russia has been developing the Topol-M mobile ballistic missile, the Bulava submarine-launched ballistic missile, the S-400 missile interceptor, a new evading warhead, fifth-generation fighter planes and missile-launching submarines. Progress was slow and funds were scarce, but the surge in oil and gas wealth made it possible to overcome problems and accelerate these programs.

Now Mr. Putin is using his improving military to throw his weight around, confronting countries from Georgia to Norway. He has resumed long-range nuclear bomber flights, refuses to cooperate with Britain on a KGB murder, claims the North Pole for Russia, sells air defense missiles to Syria and threatens to target NATO countries by basing missiles in Russia’s Kaliningrad enclave.

Instead of joining Europe and America to oppose the threat of militant Islam, Mr. Putin has turned to China, Iran and other authoritarian regimes against the West. He is recreating the Warsaw Pact in Central Asia — the Shanghai Cooperation Organization. Known as a “dictator’s club,” it is led by China and Russia and includes four former Soviet republics but expected to grow with Iran and other countries seeking to join.

All this is fine with most Russians, who have the strong leader they wanted. A poll by the Yuri-Levada Institute published in February found 68 percent of Russians said their top priority was “security.” Democracy was hardly mentioned. Other findings were that 75 percent consider Russia a Eurasian state, while only 10 percent think they are part of the West.

Mr. Putin has said he will honor the constitution.  Nevertheless, he could decide to emulate his friend, Venezuela’s President Hugo Chavez, and make himself president for life. Amending the Russian constitution requires large majorities of both the Federation Council and Duma, which he undoubtedly could get from these rubber-stamp bodies, but it would require payoffs or concessions he may not want to make.

So he appears to be grooming First Deputy Prime Minister Sergei Ivanov as his successor. Since the constitution bars him from running more than twice “in succession,” but leaves open the possibility of a later return, he may plan to have Mr. Ivanov run next year for one term and then replace him. Meanwhile, he would expect to control the country as a “gray eminence” from behind the scenes.

But that is easier said than done. Mr. Ivanov is a highly capable former KGB officer and defense minister. If he wins the vast powers of the Russian presidency, it may not be easy for a former president to control him. Once out of power, Mr. Putin may find it hard to get back in. Of course, he could anoint a more pliable candidate to serve as caretaker president.

Russian democracy is at risk. For the future of his country, Mr. Putin should honor the constitution and retire permanently next year.

James T. Hackett is a contributing writer to The Washington Times based in Carlsbad, Calif.

The essay above was used with permission.

Related:

Cold War Redux?
(Our own commentary on Mr. Putin and Russia)

Chavez foes rally against reform

August 17, 2007

By FABIOLA SANCHEZ, Associated Press

CARACAS, Venezuela – Opponents of President Hugo Chavez vowed Thursday to block his plans to radically overhaul the constitution, warning the changes would give him unlimited power and cripple democracy in Venezuela.

Some of the more sweeping constitutional reforms proposed by Chavez Wednesday night would extend presidential terms from six to seven years and eliminate current limits on his re-election. He also wants the central government to have greater control over local government and would end the autonomy of Venezuela’s Central Bank — potentially funneling billions of dollars in foreign reserves into social programs.

Chavez called for a transition to “a new society”….

Related stories:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070816/wl_afp/
venezuelapoliticsconstitution_070816072353

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070816/wl_nm/
venezuela_chavez_dc_8

War By Every Possible Means

August 10, 2007

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
August 10, 2007

America is losing the world-wide war against America. That’s right, the world-wide war against America.

This is not just our war against terrorists or terrorism. This is also about three or four-fifths of the rest of the world opposing the “Only Superpower.”

Just as when ancient Rome became decadent and soft and hired more and more mercenaries to fight its wars; we Americans are discussing gay marriage at political “debates” while China and Russia make deals to oppose the U.S. plan to throttle Iran’s nuclear program.

While John Edwards is getting his $400.00 haircut, about one million Chinese “hackers” are launching a cyber attack against U.S. computers.

Why does Newt Gingrich, a student of history and a well schooled Washington insider, add to his speeches, “We are in trouble, and somebody had better start talking about it in a blunt way.”

You think that is just a cute tag line or does he believe it?

The war we are already engaged in is a world-wide war against the U.S. and that’s us.

We at Peace and Freedom view “war” as a struggle for dominance in many areas: geo-political influence, resources, science and technology and everything else. The U.S. has already proven, with the assistance of terrorists and insurgents from around the globe, that the best military doesn’t always “win.” The lessons of the war in Vietnam are locked in which Pentagon safe?

What we are talking about is a war by every possible means that is being launched against the U.S. and to which the U.S. should respond. It is a war to assemble political, manufacturing, military, technological and mineral wealth.

And we are losing.

Consider China. You have read any news lately in any credible “world view” publication or web site that DIDN’T have some jaw dropping news about China?

Here are just a few topics and headlines recently from China (and a few other places):

China could use pile of cash to invest in USA

China Threat: “Nuclear Option” Against U.S. Economy

China’s Golden Cyber-Shield

Vietnam: New Gold Rush

In Iraq, China Arming Both Sides: U.S.

Report: Risk of nuclear warfare rising

Missiles Everywhere

A $1.5 trillion mistake: Pakistan, North Korea, Iran and the Nuclear Nexus

Well, you get the idea.

During the last year, China opened the world’s largest seaport: in Pakistan. China deflected international pressure on the genocide in Darfur so it could continue to hustle Sudan’s leadership to gain a monopoly over that county’s oil. China destroyed a satellite with an Anti-Satellite (ASAT) missile test. A Chinese submarine maneuvered undetected into a position that allowed it to surface within sight of a U.S. aircraft carrier. North Korea tested at least one nuclear device. Iran threatened to go nuclear and tested missiles of increasing range: perhaps they can already reach into Europe. And while the U.N. and U.S. wring their hands about pollution and global warming, China continues to hide behind the legalese that it is a “developing nation” and exempt from restrictions like those in the Kyoto pact. That air pollution over Beijing is from manufacturing, my friend. A manufacturing juggernaut.

During the last year Vladimir Putin in Russia has opposed the U.S. on all fronts, invoking old Cold War rhetoric. Russia has been reinvigorated by oil wealth.

Chihuahuas like Hugo Chavez upped their ugly rhetoric and initiated more anti-U.S. positions and actions.

Cindy Sheehan when to Venezuela to visit. Nancy Pelosi went to Syria to visit. And during a Democratic debate, Barak Obama said he’s go anywhere to visit.

While Meredith Viera of NBCs TODAY Show tasted Chinese cuisine in Beijing to the delight of some grinning Chinese stooge Olympic handler, China was sucking as much iron and tin out of Africa as it could find.

While Americans sat transfixed to Paris Hilton and other meaningless and fleeting news, some ground-shaking world events have occurred. What we need to know is: has this been due to geological shifts or nuclear testing?

I don’t want to be painted an alarmist and dismissed to a corner of the room. What we are urging is a reawakening of our view of the world situation and a change to the sleepwalking politicians at the debates so far. Get Dennis Kucinich off the stage for God’s sake and let’s hear what Mr. Gingrich has to say.

My friend Les Lothringer, who lives and works in China and has spent his lifetime understanding international business says, “The U.S. has made a mistake allowing so much manufacturing and R&D to come here [to China], or anywhere for that matter. It should be brought back to the U.S. The Chinese economy will slow. Americans will learn some financial discipline and American domestic technical know-how, which made the US pre-eminent, will assert itself.”

To ignore Les’ advice is folly, we believe. Viewed as a monopoly board, all the hotels and properties are headed out of the U.S.

And we are not even discussing this mass migration.

Related:

 Excellent Gingrich Speech, National Press Club, Aug. 7, 2007

Americans Swallowing Communist Precept: Ideology Over Competence

Beijing is rushing to make its air clean for the 2008 Olympics, but experts say it will be impossible for the site to be totally safe for athletes at the global sporting event.
Beijing on a “clear” day…..

Related:
Russia, China and allies play war game
and
Prioritizing Trouble