Archive for the ‘Hispanics’ Category

Mitch McConnell: Washington’s most important Republican and second-most consequential elected official

November 13, 2008

“I hope to have God on my side, but I must have Kentucky.

Abraham Lincoln

Which is how discerning conservatives felt while waiting to see if, in Election Day’s second-most important voting, Kentuckians would grant a fifth term to Mitch McConnell, leader of the Senate Republicans. They did, making him Washington’s most important Republican and second-most consequential elected official. This apotheosis has happened even though he is handicapped by, as National Review rather cruelly says, “an owlish, tight-lipped public demeanor reminiscent of George Will.”

Mitch McConnell

That disability is, however, a strength because it precludes an occupational hazard of senators — presidential ambition. Besides, McConnell, 66, is completely a man of the Senate. At 22, he was an intern for Sen. John Sherman Cooper and went from law school to the staff of Sen. Marlow Cook. Because McConnell has been so thoroughly marinated in the institution’s subtle mores and complex rules, he will wring maximum leverage from probably 43 Republican votes.

Which is why Democrats spared no expense in attempting to unhorse him, recruiting a rich opponent and supplementing his spending with $6 million from the national party. McConnell, to his great credit, had made himself vulnerable by opposing the “Millionaires’ Amendment” to the McCain-Feingold law restricting political speech. That amendment punished wealthy, self-financing candidates by allowing their opponents to spend much more than the law otherwise allows. Last summer, the Supreme Court struck down the amendment for the reasons McConnell opposed it, including this one: Government has no business fine-tuning electoral competition by equalizing candidates’ abilities to speak.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/w
p-dyn/content/article/2008/11/1
2/AR2008111202543.html?hpid=opinionsbox1

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Republicans feel good about Obama match-up

April 3, 2008
By John Whitesides, Political Correspondent 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Hillary Clinton may be the Democrat who Republicans love to hate, but some Republican strategists say they have no fear of a match-up with her rival Barack Obama in November’s presidential election.
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Many Republicans have long believed Clinton, the polarizing New York senator and former first lady with the high negative ratings, would make an easier White House foe by energizing conservatives and alienating independents.

But Republicans say the relentless Democratic nominating battle has given them new hope for November and exposed weaknesses in Obama that will play a central role in any general election campaign against the Illinois senator.

“I believe he has a glass jaw — and he is going to get hit hard,” said Republican pollster Tony Fabrizio.

Obama’s voting record in the U.S. Senate — one magazine ranked him the most liberal senator in 2007 — and during his years in the Illinois state Senate will get a more thorough examination in a campaign against Republican John McCain than it has so far, he said.

“He portrays himself as a centrist and a moderate, but if you look at his votes it’s tough to see anything but a liberal. He is more liberal than Hillary Clinton,” Fabrizio said.

The questions raised by Clinton about Obama’s lack of experience and suitability as commander in chief will be revitalized, Republicans say, as will the controversy about inflammatory comments by Obama’s pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright.

Coupling that with Obama’s weakness among blue-collar Democrats and Hispanics, and the possibility of a prolonged nominating fight that turns off Clinton backers and independents, Republicans are gaining confidence about a November race against Obama.

Many Republicans have long believed Clinton, the polarizing New York senator and former first lady with the high negative ratings, would make an easier White House foe by energizing conservatives and alienating independents.

But Republicans say the relentless Democratic nominating battle has given them new hope for November and exposed weaknesses in Obama that will play a central role in any general election campaign against the Illinois senator.

“I believe he has a glass jaw — and he is going to get hit hard,” said Republican pollster Tony Fabrizio.

Obama’s voting record in the U.S. Senate — one magazine ranked him the most liberal senator in 2007 — and during his years in the Illinois state Senate will get a more thorough examination in a campaign against Republican John McCain than it has so far, he said.

“He portrays himself as a centrist and a moderate, but if you look at his votes it’s tough to see anything but a liberal. He is more liberal than Hillary Clinton,” Fabrizio said.

The questions raised by Clinton about Obama’s lack of experience and suitability as commander in chief will be revitalized, Republicans say, as will the controversy about inflammatory comments by Obama’s pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright.

Coupling that with Obama’s weakness among blue-collar Democrats and Hispanics, and the possibility of a prolonged nominating fight that turns off Clinton backers and independents, Republicans are gaining confidence about a November race against Obama.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080403/pl_nm/usa_
politics_election_dc;_ylt=Ap1d
MQ2DZ_VLuTG.Mx2ECoCs0NUE

Two Years After Katrina, New Orleans Slowly Recovering

September 2, 2007

By Greg Flakus
Voice of America
Houston
29 August 2007

Two years ago Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf coast of the United States, devastating a wide area from Louisiana to Alabama, with an especially tragic outcome in the city of New Orleans, where a surge of water caused by the storm toppled levees and flooded much of the city.

Today, New Orleans continues its slow pace of recovery and urban experts envision a somewhat smaller and somewhat different city. VOA’s Greg Flakus has more from Houston.

Two years after Katrina, a large number of people who refer to themselves as being from New Orleans still live in Houston and in other cities around the country. Some say they want to return; some are resigned to stay where they are.

Blacks once represented 70 percent of the population, with whites at 28 percent and Hispanics and Asians dividing up the remaining two percent.

Now, he says, the Hispanic population has surged, Blacks are down below 50 percent and whites are just above 40 percent. Another change he sees is fewer children in many neighborhoods and fewer elderly as well. These trends result from poor schools and a weak healthcare system.

Read it all at:
http://www.voanews.com/english/2007-08-29-voa39.cfm