Archive for the ‘Hillary’ Category

U.S. Is Child’s Play: Obama Can Rule The World; Hillary Can Be Manliest Guy In Cabinet

December 2, 2008

Another Barack Obama came in from the cold Monday. The man who gave us the unexpected in his team to resurrect the economy introduced his team to reorganize the world of which he sees himself as president-elect. The new message is clear – being president merely of the United States is for bush-leaguers.

Hillary Clinton, who suggested she has the equipment to be the manliest member of the entire Obama administration, invoked the campaign mantra right away, cheering an uneasy cult after those earlier appointments. She’s not only for change, but “positive” change. She promised to work with the toy countries of the world to resolve global crises.

By Wesley Pruden
The Washington Times

President-elect Barack Obama announces that U.S. Sen. Hillary ... 
President-elect Barack Obama announces that U.S. Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-NY) will be his choice for U.S. Secretary of State during a news conference in Chicago December 1, 2008.(Jeff Haynes/Reuters) 

“The American people have demanded not just a new direction at home, but a new effort to renew America’s standing in the world as a force for positive change,” she said. She vowed to “reach out to the world again,” to give the thirsty world a Coke after the drought of the Bush years.

The president-elect said the appointment of Mrs. Clinton, who once mocked Mr. Obama’s cut-and-run strategy for Iraq and derided him as a naive amateur for promising to talk to global troublemakers without first determining whether they were serious about making nice, is “a sign to friend and foe of the seriousness of my commitment to renew American diplomacy and restore our alliances.”

President-elect Barack Obama announces that Sen. Hillary Clinton ...
President-elect Barack Obama announces that Sen. Hillary Clinton will be his choice for Secretary of State during a news conference in Chicago December 1, 2008.(John Gress/Reuters)

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2008/dec/02/in-from-the-cold-a-familiar-obama/

Ariz Gov Janet Napolitano Rumored for Homeland Security Post; Progress on other Cabinet Slots

November 20, 2008

Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano, an early Barack Obama supporter from the southwestern part of the country, is a leading contender for the job of secretary of homeland security, Democratic officials said Thursday.

These officials caution that no final decision has been made on the position, which involves directing the massive department created by the Congress in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States.

By KEVIN FREKING, Associated Press Writer

In this Nov. 13, 2008 file photo, Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano ... 
In this Nov. 13, 2008 file photo, Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Napolitano is President-elect Barack Obama’s primary choice to be secretary of the Homeland Security Department, several news organizations reported Thursday Nov. 20, 2008.(AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke)

The officials agreed to discuss the situation only on grounds of anonymity because of the private nature of the screening process for Obama’s Cabinet. Napolitano, who once was Arizona’s attorney general, was among the first of the Democratic governors to commit to him.

Several news organizations reported Thursday that Chicago businesswoman Penny Pritzker, who was Obama’s national campaign finance chairman, is his leading choice to become secretary of commerce.

Among the names being bandied about as the Obama transition team sets up the new government are several people with long careers as Washington insiders, notwithstanding Obama’s clarion call in his campaign for change in the nation’s capital.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081120/ap_on_go_pr_wh/obama_
cabinet;_ylt=AtY.xNyz4wMX96GZZNZjM3Os0NUE

Obama, Clinton Schizoid Relationship

November 11, 2008

They have needed each other.  They ran against each other.  They love each other.  Or do they all hate one another?

By Amie Parnes
Politico
.
Michelle Obama wasn’t always an admirer of Hillary Clinton, but last Wednesday the soon-to-be first lady dialed up the former first lady for pointers on protecting her two young daughters from the media maelstrom of the White House.

“Michelle may not have loved the senator, but she always respected how the Clintons raised Chelsea,” said a person familiar with Clinton’s end of the call. “They need to talk. There just aren’t too many people who have shared that kind of experience.”

An aide briefed on Obama’s side of the chat said she was “grateful” for Clinton’s “pointers” on “raising children in the public eye.”

It’s the latest phase in the ruling-class soap opera that is the Obama-Clinton alliance, where the two first families negotiate new personal relationships as Hillary Clinton wrestles with her own ambivalence about Michelle Obama’s husband, a man she once ridiculed as too callow to govern, and then worked tirelessly to elect.

These tensions have created a somewhat schizoid relationship between Clinton and the Obamas – warm on personal matters, warier on political ones, and downright frosty on the still-unresolved issue of Clinton’s mountainous campaign debt, which Barack Obama had pledged to help reduce.

Senator Clinton did not just check the box for Obama – she went all out for him, which says an awful lot about how important she felt this election was, what kind of character she has, and the positive state of their relationship,” said Chris Lehane, an aide to both John Kerry and Al Gore during their presidential bids.

Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., campaigns for Democratic ... 
Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., campaigns for Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., Monday, Nov. 3, 2008, in St. Charles, Mo.(AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Since the Democratic National Convention, Hillary Clinton headlined about three dozen rallies and fundraisers – working rope-lines where well-wishers often lamented her exit from the race. 
Bill Clinton, who once called Obama’s Iraq policy “a fairy tale,” hosted about 20 events for Obama after the Illinois senator paid homage to him with a mid-September visit to his Harlem office.

Obama responded by lavishing praise on the pair – after months of questioning the legacy of the Clinton White House. More importantly, he embraced much of Hillary Rodham Clinton’s domestic agenda, especially her health care and green jobs proposals.

Yet a half-dozen Clinton insiders told Politico they are disappointed that Obama’s vaunted fundraising operation hasn’t reciprocated by planning new events or an Internet campaign to help Clinton pay off the $7.9 million she owes to vendors. (Clinton has already written off the $13 million she loaned the campaign during the primaries, aides say).

“I don’t think there’s a whole lot of hard feelings, it’s more like mild annoyance,” said a former Clinton aide on condition of anonymity. “There’s just not a lot of expectation they are going to lift a finger for us.”

Added another longtime Clinton adviser: “She killed herself for them, did a hundred events, went anywhere they pointed – so it’s disappointing they aren’t helping… But it’s not a big deal at this point.”

One former Clinton fundraiser took a more cold-blooded view. “In a few months, when he’s really struggling, he’ll come to her for support,” he said. “That’s when she should ask him for money.”

An Obama spokesman didn’t comment but didn’t rule out a debt retirement effort down the road.

Clinton is expecting a warmer reception from Obama on legislative issues.

People close to the New York senator say she is still struggling to define her role in the Senate following a jarring and unexpected loss. But she’s sure of one thing: she desperately wants to play a major role in crafting the health care reform Obama has pledged to introduce.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/politico/20081111/pl_politico/154
98;_ylt=AhHIK34as9EkRbcklUR1XPes0NUE

Good looks help women candidates, men not so much

October 31, 2008

Women running for top offices need to appear competent and attractive, according to a new study. For male candidates, seeming competent may be enough.

By RANDOLPH E. SCHMID, AP Science Writer

It’s a finding that could help justify heavy spending on makeup and wardrobe for Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin, while at the same time raising questions about the need for a man like John Edwards to invest in a costly haircut.

“What we found was quite startling,” said Joan Y. Chiao of Northwestern University’s psychology department.

For male candidates, the only thing that mattered to male voters was competence, while female voters preferred men who seemed both competent and approachable.

But for “female candidates for a hypothetical election for the United States presidency, both male and female voters were more likely to vote for candidates that were both competent and attractive,” Chiao said in a telephone interview.

“Neither trait (alone) was sufficient to predict whether a person was going to vote for that candidate,” she added. Chiao’s findings are being published online by the journal PLoS ONE.

“For female candidates, it really matters if they’re perceived as competent and perceived as attractive. Those two qualities are sort of twin predictors of whether or not someone is going to be more or less likely to vote for them,” Chiao stressed.

Why?

“There are a lot of potential theories,” she said. Most likely may be the way people choose friends and mates.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081031/ap_on_sc/sci_pretty_politicians;_
ylt=Aoz_.Aimqfp2u9pt4q6EqOys0NUE

McCain, Obama Entertain; Only One is Good At Laughing at Himself…..

October 17, 2008

A woman who attended the dinner told us “Barack is just not good at laughing at himself….if he can laugh at all….” But McCain and Obama both laughed….see the video….

The Earth Times

Washington – The US presidential candidates put aside the serious business of courting voters Thursday night to match wits before a well-heeled crowd that expected to be entertained, not wooed. Dressed in a white tie and black dinner jacket, Republican John McCain, 72, insisted he had dismissed his entire team of senior advisors and replaced them with “a man named Joe the Plumber” – a reference to an Ohio man who has become Everyman in the bitter race for the White House.

 

Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain speaks at ...
Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain has some fun at the 63rd Annual Alfred E. Smith Foundation Dinner in New York, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008 in New York.( AP Photo/Andrew Theodorakis)

Democrat Barack Obama, 47, also in white tie, joked about his partial Kenyan ancestry and his middle name Hussein that has provoked centre-right Republican suspicions that he could be foreign or even Muslim.

“Many know I got my name from my father, Barack, which is actually Swahili for ‘that one,'” Barack said, jabbing at McCain’s dismissive reference to him during one debate. “I got my middle name from somebody who obviously didn’t think I’d ever run for president.”

The audience roared with delight at the unaccustomed light- heartedness and charm of the two senators, after many had just the night before watched them parry sharp verbal swords during the final debate before the November 4 elections.

The occasion was the annual fund-raising dinner to commemorate Alfred E Smith, the 1928 Democratic nominee who was the first Catholic to run for US president from a major political party.

Cardinal Edward Egan, head of the archdiocese of….

See the You Tube video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j82lhqiAF-M

Read the Rest:
http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/237449,mccain-
obama-vie-for-laughs-not-votes-at-white-tie-event.html

Republicans feel good about Obama match-up

April 3, 2008
By John Whitesides, Political Correspondent 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Hillary Clinton may be the Democrat who Republicans love to hate, but some Republican strategists say they have no fear of a match-up with her rival Barack Obama in November’s presidential election.
.
Many Republicans have long believed Clinton, the polarizing New York senator and former first lady with the high negative ratings, would make an easier White House foe by energizing conservatives and alienating independents.

But Republicans say the relentless Democratic nominating battle has given them new hope for November and exposed weaknesses in Obama that will play a central role in any general election campaign against the Illinois senator.

“I believe he has a glass jaw — and he is going to get hit hard,” said Republican pollster Tony Fabrizio.

Obama’s voting record in the U.S. Senate — one magazine ranked him the most liberal senator in 2007 — and during his years in the Illinois state Senate will get a more thorough examination in a campaign against Republican John McCain than it has so far, he said.

“He portrays himself as a centrist and a moderate, but if you look at his votes it’s tough to see anything but a liberal. He is more liberal than Hillary Clinton,” Fabrizio said.

The questions raised by Clinton about Obama’s lack of experience and suitability as commander in chief will be revitalized, Republicans say, as will the controversy about inflammatory comments by Obama’s pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright.

Coupling that with Obama’s weakness among blue-collar Democrats and Hispanics, and the possibility of a prolonged nominating fight that turns off Clinton backers and independents, Republicans are gaining confidence about a November race against Obama.

Many Republicans have long believed Clinton, the polarizing New York senator and former first lady with the high negative ratings, would make an easier White House foe by energizing conservatives and alienating independents.

But Republicans say the relentless Democratic nominating battle has given them new hope for November and exposed weaknesses in Obama that will play a central role in any general election campaign against the Illinois senator.

“I believe he has a glass jaw — and he is going to get hit hard,” said Republican pollster Tony Fabrizio.

Obama’s voting record in the U.S. Senate — one magazine ranked him the most liberal senator in 2007 — and during his years in the Illinois state Senate will get a more thorough examination in a campaign against Republican John McCain than it has so far, he said.

“He portrays himself as a centrist and a moderate, but if you look at his votes it’s tough to see anything but a liberal. He is more liberal than Hillary Clinton,” Fabrizio said.

The questions raised by Clinton about Obama’s lack of experience and suitability as commander in chief will be revitalized, Republicans say, as will the controversy about inflammatory comments by Obama’s pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright.

Coupling that with Obama’s weakness among blue-collar Democrats and Hispanics, and the possibility of a prolonged nominating fight that turns off Clinton backers and independents, Republicans are gaining confidence about a November race against Obama.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080403/pl_nm/usa_
politics_election_dc;_ylt=Ap1d
MQ2DZ_VLuTG.Mx2ECoCs0NUE

Obama Casts Race Between Him, McCain (Ignoring Hillary)

April 1, 2008
By DEVLIN BARRETT, Associated Press Writer

WILKES-BARRE, Pa. – Sen. Barack Obama is talking about the elephant in the room — Republican rival John McCain — and all but ignoring the Democratic donkey who stands between him and his party’s presidential nomination.
.
Even though Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton was campaigning down the Northeast Extension in Philadelphia, Obama criticized the likely Republican nominee’s policies on the U.S. troop presence in Iraq, trade and tax cuts. In his town-hall session Tuesday, and in other campaign appearances in recent days, Obama has sought to frame the race as a general election matchup between him and McCain.

Of course, there’s the little matter of a Pennsylvania primary on April 22, and Clinton’s double-digit lead in recent state polls.

The extended presidential nomination contest has resulted in an odd political triangle, with each candidate taking alternate turns criticizing one or both of their competitors.

“He’s on a biography tour right now,” Obama said of McCain. “Most of us know his biography, and it’s worthy of our admiration. My argument with John McCain is not with his biography, it’s with his policies.”

Obama argued that McCain would merely be another four years of President Bush on economic and military policies. McCain has criticized Obama as being inexperienced on national security, and the Illinois senator answered back.

Read the rest:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080401/ap_on_el_pr/
obama_mccain;_ylt=Apl_60vv8V4S9zYCkavgcX6s0NUE

 

Obama has unwittingly enhanced his image as the African American candidate

March 24, 2008

By Robert D. Novak
The Washington Post 
Monday, March 24, 2008; Page A13

Barack Obama‘s speech last week, hastily prepared to extinguish the firestorm over the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, won critical praise for style and substance but failed politically. By elevating the question of race in America, the front-running Democratic presidential candidate has deepened the dilemma created by his campaign’s success against the party establishment’s anointed choice, Hillary Clinton.

In rejecting the racist views of his longtime spiritual mentor but not disowning him, Obama has unwittingly enhanced his image as the African American candidate — as opposed to being just a remarkable candidate who happens to be black. That poses a dilemma for unelected superdelegates, who as professional politicians will settle the contest because neither Obama nor Clinton can win enough elected delegates to be nominated.

Superdelegates, though they were inclined toward Clinton as recently as three months ago, now flinch at the idea of rejecting Obama. They fear antagonizing African Americans, who have become the hard-core Democratic base. But what if national polls continue their post-Wright trend and show Obama trailing both Clinton and Republican John McCain in popular support? The Obama strategists’ hope of reversing that trend depends on whether his eloquent race speech, which he continued to reprise on the campaign trail all week, can overcome videos exposing his pastor’s demagoguery.

Thanks to proportional representation, which was enacted as part of radical Democratic reform a generation ago, no candidate can replicate George McGovern‘s nomination victory in 1972 by capturing winner-take-all primaries. It is not possible for Clinton to score large enough victories in the remaining nine primaries (starting with Pennsylvania on April 22) to move ahead of Obama in delegates or the accumulated popular vote. Those goals became unreachable with the apparent Clinton failure to force a revote in Michigan and Florida.

That means Clinton must convince superdelegates that Obama is not electable — validating this judgment by a neutral Democratic leader: “It was a great speech, but it cannot overcome the powerful [Wright] video.” Since Obama’s race declaration, he has fallen behind McCain nationally in various polls and trails by as much as eight percentage points in Rasmussen tracking.

In head-to-head tests with Clinton, he is two points behind in Rasmussen tracking and has slipped in other surveys, though he is still leading. Polls in Pennsylvania taken before Obama’s speech Tuesday showed that Clinton’s narrow lead had expanded to double digits, and private surveys since then indicate the margin is growing.

To combat that, the Obama high command privately contacted superdelegates Friday to report that his Pennsylvania and Indiana polling numbers have “come back” (without specifying by how much). Obama agents are also trying to minimize the distinctiveness of his embrace with Wright by distributing photos and letters showing Bill Clinton‘s contacts with the Chicago preacher in 1998, when the president was wooing friendly clergymen in his campaign against impeachment.

The problem for Obama is that furor over Wright has reached beyond voters normally interested in political controversies. Over the past week, I have been asked repeatedly by non-political people about Obama’s connection with Wright’s tirades. In the process, Obama’s political persona has been altered — transformed from Harvard Law Review to South Side activist, as described by one friendly Chicago politician.

The Clinton campaign has shied away from official comment about Wright. But in off-the-record talks with superdelegates, Clinton’s agents claim that the connection casts doubt on Obama’s electability. Furthermore, one Democratic operative who is inclined toward Obama warns that the issue will be raised in much harsher terms by Republicans during the general election campaign. In last week’s Clinton conference call with the media, senior adviser Harold Ickes questioned “whether Senator Obama is going to be able to stand up to the Republican attack machine.”

The consensus among knowledgeable Democrats is that Obama will win over enough superdelegates to clinch the nomination before the national convention in August, partly because of fear about the consequences if he does not. But one longtime associate said this of the Clintons in private conversation last week: “They will do anything — anything — to get nominated.” That reminder deepens the Democratic dilemma.

Advisers to both fault Obama camp

March 24, 2008
By DARLENE SUPERVILLE, Associated Press

WASHINGTON – Prominent supporters of Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama on Sunday both faulted Obama’s campaign for allowing a retired general and backer of the Illinois senator to equate comments by Clinton’s husband — which appeared to question Obama’s patriotism — to McCarthyism.

“I don’t believe President Clinton was implying that,” said New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, a former presidential candidate who endorsed Obama last week. “But the point here … is that the campaign has gotten too negative — too many personal attacks, too much negativity that is not resounding with the public.”

After the Obama endorsement, Clinton adviser James Carville compared Richardson to Judas. On Sunday, Richardson said: “I’m not going to get in the gutter like that. And you know, that’s typical of many of the people around Senator Clinton. They think they have a sense of entitlement to the presidency.”

Asked whether Obama’s campaign was being too negative in accusing former President Clinton of McCarthyism, Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell, a Clinton supporter, said, “Of course … the Obama campaign tries to have it both ways,” he said.

Rendell said Bill Clinton was saying what many people think, that the campaign should focus on the economy, health care and the candidates’ experience, for example, and not on race and other distractions.

“And instead they launch this all-out attack trying to take an inference out of President Clinton’s words that no fair person could take,” Rendell said. “It’s an example of the negativity that Governor Richardson is talking about.

“If they want to tone it down, don’t accuse someone of McCarthyism,” Rendell said.

Both governors commented on “Fox News Sunday.”

In Charlotte, N.C., last Friday and speculating about a general election matchup pitting his wife against Republican John McCain, Bill Clinton told a group of veterans: “I think it would be a great thing if we had an election year where you had two people who loved this country and were devoted to the interest of this country. And people could actually ask themselves who is right on these issues, instead of all this other stuff that always seems to intrude itself on our politics.”

Retired Gen. Merrill “Tony” McPeak, a co-chairman of Obama’s campaign, took offense and accused Clinton of being divisive and trying to question Obama’s patriotism. Standing with Obama at a campaign stop in southern Oregon, McPeak repeated Bill Clinton’s comments for the audience, then said:

General Merrill Anthony McPeak

“As one who for 37 years proudly wore the uniform of our country, I’m saddened to see a president employ these tactics. He of all people should know better because he was the target of exactly the same kind of tactics.”

That was an apparent reference to Bill Clinton’s 1992 presidential campaign, when he was accused of dodging the Vietnam War draft.

McPeak also made off-the-cuff remarks to reporters Friday in comparing the former president’s comments with the actions of Joseph McCarthy, the 1950s communist-hunting senator.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080323/ap_on_el_
pr/obama_patriotism_15

Pressure grows on Democrats to unite behind a candidate

March 23, 2008
by Michael Mathes

WASHINGTON (AFP) – Democrats came under mounting pressure Sunday to close ranks behind a single candidate, as Hillary Clinton faces dwindling mathematical possibilities of defeating Barack Obama for her party’s nod for the White House.

The increasingly bitter presidential campaign faces weeks of harsh confrontation ahead of next month’s crucial primary clash in Pennsylvania, one of 10 remaining contests to decide who will face off against Republican John McCain in November.

New York Senator Clinton is in an uphill battle to shrink the gap between her and Obama, the Illinois senator who holds a lead in the number of nominating delegates, the percentage of the nationwide popular vote and the number of contests won in the 2008 campaign.

Some analysts were saying Clinton’s chances of pulling out a victory were receding by the day, with respected US newspaper Politico stressing Obama would have to be “hit by a political meteor” for Clinton to win the nomination.

Clinton’s own campaign reportedly has acknowledged that there is virtually no way she can finish ahead of Obama in pledged delegates.

“She will be close to him but certainly not equal to him in pledged delegates,” a Clinton advisor told Politico.

Estimates show Obama leading the former first lady in pledged delegates 1,628 to 1,493, and ahead in the primary popular vote by some 750,000 people.

A Democratic presidential contender would need 2,025 delegates to secure the nomination, but with just about 500 more delegates still up for grabs it will be virtually impossible for either to win the contest outright.

That leaves the Democratic contest in the hands of 796 superdelegates, assigned by the Democratic National Committee, who can vote the way they wish at the convention.

Independent website RealClearPolitics.com puts the superdelegate count at 250 for Clinton and 214 for Obama as of Sunday.

New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson, who threw his support behind Obama on Friday….

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080323/ts_alt_
afp/usvote;_ylt=ApvA4_YpdZj1ASP1nv6tIzes0NUE