Archive for the ‘harry potter’ Category

Harry Potter, Gay Life and “Question Authority”

October 24, 2007

By Ben Shapiro
Townhall
October 24, 2007

I  am not a fan of the Harry Potter series. Nonetheless, I, like every other sentient human being, know something about Harry Potter. Most of my friends are fans. My three younger sisters are fans. I’ve seen the movies. I’ve read small portions of several of the books.So when J.K. Rowling announced last week that Albus Dumbledore, the aged headmaster of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, was gay, I was somewhat confused. When did the old dude with the funky beard turn into Gore Vidal?  

According to Rowling, Dumbledore was always Gore Vidal. At a Carnegie Hall reading, one of Rowling’s fans asked whether Dumbledore had ever found “true love.” “Dumbledore is gay,” Rowling gleefully responded. Dumbledore was apparently in love with his rival, Gellert Grindelwald, a dark wizard. “Falling in love can blind us to an extent,” Rowling explained. Dumbledore’s homosexual crush, Rowling stated, was his “great tragedy.” Rowling went on to label the Harry Potter books a “prolonged argument for tolerance” and told her fans to “question authority.”

Read the rest:
http://www.townhall.com/columnists/BenShapiro/
2007/10/24/dumbledore_waves_the_rainbow_flag

Related:
Another Reason to Avoid “Harry Potter” Books

Harry Potter: More Worthless Pop Culture

Kids reading fewer books despite Harry Potter hoopla

Priest Says Harry Potter Helps Devil, Evil

Our Nation: Based Upon God, Not Fiction

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Another Reason to Avoid “Harry Potter” Books

October 22, 2007

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
October 22, 2007

Congratulations to Harry Potter series author J.K. Rowling who is now re-writing her best sellers in public pronouncements long after completion the editing and publication process.

Ms. Rowling stunned an audience this weekend by proclaiming that Dumbledore, the wise Hogwarts headmaster and mentor to Harry, is gay.

The liberal media has jumped on this morsel of new information, telling media outlets that now Harry Potter can teach our children about “tolerance.”

Personally, I have come to hate that word “tolerance” as a staple of liberal Democrats, Bill Clinton and others we have no use for at Peace and Freedom.

It might not be politically correct but we much prefer the word “standards” to tolerance – since the liberal media has turned tolerance into “just about anything goes.”

The NBC “Today Show,” the same show that sympathized with gay comedian Ellen about her dog predicament, gleefully reported the new news on Harry Potter and his buddies.

Frankly, we think this is another reason to deny Ms. Rowling any more wealth for producing questionable if not down right detrimental reading material aimed at our children.

Do your kids a favor: get them interested in the facts of history. Real people with real skills and real bravery are a lot better than fantasy, magic and extolling the virtues (?) of gay people.

We don’t hate gay people but we sure do not think they need to be put upon a pedestal or held up as role models for our kids either.

We think one’s sex life — anyone’s sex life — is a private matter.

********************
Priests Say Harry Potter Promotes Evil

Miguel Sanchez
For Peace and Freedom
July 23, 2007
(Mexico City)

Is Harry Potter really a good thing for your children to read?

At least one member of the Roman Catholic Church clergy has come forward to say Harry Potter could do damage to a child’s mind.

The Reverend Pedro Mendoza is the Director of Exorcists in the Archdiocese of Mexico City.

Peace and Freedom caught up with Father Mendoza after learning he had a strongly contrary view to the masses who turned out Friday night to buy the latest and apparently final Harry Potter book.

“I think a book like this does a lot of damage,” the priest told us. “At its core it is about sorcery. I am sure that is not the best use of a child’s mind.”

Father Mendoza made similar comments at the end of a five-day exorcism conference in Mexico City last week.

”If you put all these ideas in a child’s head, that he can become a wizard, the child believes that, and that is opening an avenue through which the devil can get in,” Mendoza said Friday – the eve of the release of the series’ final book.

He said that Harry Potter ”doesn’t interest us,” but ” unfortunately, it does a lot of damage.”

“When family ties began weakening, the priest said, often the mass media starts to proliferate ”new ideas” and ”abusing sensationalism.

“Without strong, faith-bound families, which he said allow individuals to see God’s work in everyday life, people lose touch with God and seek ‘magical solutions’ to modern problems.”

“There are many demonic influences, curses and forms of witchcraft,” he said. ”And it’s in that field that the devil is able to work.”

“We should not accept sorcery or wizardry as a good thing when there is so much good in the world to embrace.”

Another priest with parallel views is Father John Corapi who says, “It is just not wise to place yourself or your children in the near occasion of evil.”

Related:

Harry Potter: More Worthless Pop Culture

Kids reading fewer books despite Harry Potter hoopla

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad: Big Disappointment

September 24, 2007

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
September 25, 2007

There are no gays in Iran, the International Atomic Energy Agency says Iran’s nuclear program is for peaceful purposes, and the Holocaust never happened.

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad might actually believe these false claims but almost nobody else does.

Ahmadinejad doubts the official U.S. version of 9/11. He sounds like someone who thought Harry Potter and Peter Pan were real.

Yet he wanted to visit “Ground Zero.”  If the spot marks no actual place of historic import: why visit?

Mr. Ahmadinejad also thinks he lives in a democracy. That is because he holds power in a viciously brutal regime that has no inkling of human rights, rights for women or gay rights.  In Iran, the rights do not exist for those not in the leadership or the cream of society.

In Iran guys like Ahmadinejad and Islamic Mullah’s call the shots.  You want in?

Columbia University president Lee Bollinger said Mr. Ahmadinejad is “a petty and cruel dictator.”

Mr. Ahmadinejad used the Socratic method to question some other truths of history.

On September 11, 2001: “Why did this happen? What caused it? What conditions led to it?  Who truly was involved? Who was really involved and put it all together?”

Brilliant: except questions are not argument and certainly fall way short of facts, proof and truth: things with which the president of Iran has only a limited familiarity.

Free speech was preserved even as Ahmadinejad criticized the United States for spying on its own citizens and neglecting free speech on Monday at Columbia University.

To put this all in an academic nutshell (something Mr. Ahmadinejad might be familiar with as he was at one time a professor): Ahmadinejad: C-. Bollinger and Columbia University: A-.

Mr. Bollinger said Mr. Ahmadinejad’s denial of the Holocaust might fool the illiterate and ignorant. But not the knowledgeable and educated.

“When you come to a place like this it makes you simply ridiculous,” Bollinger said.

Thank God General Dwight David Eisenhower and others who saw into the future to this day and gave us a vast photographic and documentary record of the Holocaust.

“The truth is that the Holocaust is the most documented event in human history,” said President Bollinger.

Thank God Israel continues to work on its own security and military forces, including an airstrike against Syrian nuclear facilities just more than a week ago.

And thank God for free speech. It exposes imbeciles like Ahmadinejad, allows the educated and informed to air and debate their views in an orderly manner, and it keeps our democracy alive.

Where is it in this world is free speech stifled? Iran, North Korea, China, Vietnam, Myanmar, Thailand, Cuba and Venezuela to name a few.

Any volunteers to live under the restrictions of Hugo Chavez or Hu Jintao or Mahmoud Ahmadinejad?

Those student from Columbia University who cheered Mr. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad: we appreciate your right to believe what you will. But for tickets to China or Cuba or Venezuela or Iran: step to the head of the line. You are welcome to them.

Related:
Ahmadinejad denies 9/11, Holocaust

Ahmadinejad seeks to soothe critics

Harry Potter: More Worthless Pop Culture

China: Reversing 1,000 Year Corruption Legacy

July 24, 2007

While your kids read Harry Potter this summer, Chinese kids are likely learning a system of ideas, ethics, family values and societal order. 

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
July 24, 2007

Question: How do you change the hearts, minds, culture and actions of 1.3 billion people?

Answer: Very slowly, Grasshopper.

China has a problem dealing with the west. Simply put, the average Chinese businessman, factory supervisor, factory worker and vendor has one goal in mind: making money. You might say, “That is true of everyone in business all over the world.” True enough; but the Chinese person is a lot less likely to be governed or even slightly influenced by any culture of honesty, integrity, or tendency toward obeying laws or norms.

What’s the proof? The Chinese can tell you themselves.

The communist government of the People’s Republic of China is again fostering the teachings of Confucius. Confucianism was the moral and social code of the Chinese people for centuries until the Cultural Revolution and the advent of the PRC made Confucianism taboo. The “Red Chinese” pushed people away from Confucianism and toward the teachings of the state.

The ship of state lost its moral rudder.

There is no “state religion” in the United States, where we proudly and dearly adhere to a separation of church and state. Yet religion is widespread and permeates much of the fabric of our society.

Most western democracies have no “state religion,” even though religion is pervasive.

But in the People’s Hall’s in Beijing, leaders are discussing the notion of a “state religion.”

You know why? What they have, which is no religion, no ethics, and no moral code, isn’t working.

Conspicuous consumption is not a religion. Putting anti-freeze into toothpaste to save money is not a religion. Killing American pets with tainted pet food is not a religion. And poisoning scores of people in Panama with tainted cough syrup is not a religion.

Not only that, it is bad for business.

So there is a resurgence in at least one old familiar system that would be acceptable to China’s leadership: Confucianism.

While your kids are reading about Harry Potter and his wizardry and sorcerythis summer, Chinese kids are reading about a system of ideas, a way to live a better life and an operating system for the family and the society.

Most people in the west waste their time gamely and gladly. They already have everything money can buy, they have good jobs and lots of toys and time to kill.

I’m not saying the Chinese system is better but it might be enlightening to discover that the Chinese, seeing rampant greed and a social ethic that promotes corruption, are at least grabbing at straws on how to put the train of their society back on the tracks.

There is no Paris Hilton in China, though there are beautiful models and delightful actresses. There is no Michael Vick though there are revered sports athletes. China’s communists system always seems to have one foot on the break: unlike the full throttle party in the west.

Today, Confucianism is in a revival, and partly because the leaders in China realize that as China’s economy has grown and become global, corruption and greed have become the dominant “religion” of many people.

This is rubbing the west the wrong way.

I can remember buying pirated (illegally copied) expensive books in China in the 1970s. Books like the famous Oxford English Dictionary (OED), a tome that would cost hundreds of dollars in London, sold for just a few measly bucks in China. As I student I wanted reference books (this was before the internet, kids) and there was no place where reference books were less expensive than China. That was because the Chinese cared nothing for copyright laws or other such niceties.

Today, the U.S. is still deadlocked with China in bitter negotiations over Intellectual Property Rights (protections for books, movies, computer software, and etc.).

Today The Washington Post ran an article discussing the revival of Confucianism in China and this is no small matter. Some in the west have taken the ostrich approach to Chinese dishonest and trickery.

But the global economy cannot possibly succeed unless nations, their businesses, manufacturers and vendors play by rules.

Almost any rules of proper business behavior would be preferred over what we have from China now: poisoned toys, toothpaste, and cough syrup.

The Washington Post:
China: Trying to Fight ‘Culture of Corruption’ with Confucius

Our Detailing of “The Culture of Corruption”
China: Culture of Corruption a Problem

Why Beijing Worries About its Own People: They Sometimes Do Not Obey, Behave:

China jails two men for birth-control riots

China’s regions ignoring Beijing on environment goals

Why we don’t like Harry Potter much:

Harry Potter: More Worthless Pop Culture

Priest Says Harry Potter Helps Devil, Evil

 What Americans might be reading this summer:

Our Nation: Based Upon God, Not Fiction
Last year in China, Beijing Normal University Professor Yu Dan  wrote a series of lectures called “The Analects of Confucius.” This turned into a $3.00 book on Conficianism, which sold 4 million copies, more than double the sales of the previous bestseller, “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.”

Priest Says Harry Potter Helps Devil, Evil

July 23, 2007

(Mexico City)

Is Harry Potter really a good thing for your children to read?

At least one member of the Roman Catholic Church clergy has come forward to say Harry Potter could do damage to a child’s mind.

The Reverend Pedro Mendoza is the Director of Exorcists in the Archdiocese of Mexico City.

Peace and Freedom caught up with Father Mendoza after learning he had a strongly contrary view to the masses who turned out Friday night to buy the latest and apparently final Harry Potter book.

“I think a book like this does a lot of damage,” the priest told us. “At its core it is about sorcery. I am sure that is not the best use of a child’s mind.”

Father Mendoza made similar comments at the end of a five-day exorcism conference in Mexico City last week.

”If you put all these ideas in a child’s head, that he can become a wizard, the child believes that, and that is opening an avenue through which the devil can get in,” Mendoza said Friday – the eve of the release of the series’ final book.

He said that Harry Potter ”doesn’t interest us,” but ”unfortunately, it does a lot of damage.”

”When family ties began weakening, the priest said, often the mass media starts to proliferate ”new ideas” and ”abusing sensationalism.

”Without strong, faith-bound families, which he said allow individuals to see God’s work in everyday life, people lose touch with God and seek ‘magical solutions’ to modern problems.”

“There are many demonic influences,  curses and forms of  witchcraft,” he said. ”And it’s in that field that the devil is able to work.”

“We should not accept sorcery or wizardry as a good thing when there is so much good in the world to embrace.”

Another priest with parallel views is Father John Corapi who says, “It is just not wise to place yourself or your children in the near occasion of evil.”

Related:
Harry Potter: More Worthless Pop Culture

Kids reading fewer books despite Harry Potter hoopla

Our Nation: Based Upon God, Not Fiction

Another Reason to Avoid “Harry Potter” Books

Our Nation: Based Upon God, Not Fiction

July 23, 2007

94 percent of the Founding Fathers’ quotes in 15,000 documents were based on the Bible.

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
July 23, 2007

Because of an essay of mine about the Harry Potter book series (link at the end of this essay), I have already received many emails asking, “What makes you think the Founders of our nation really believed in God? Many didn’t go to church.”

Well, here is some of what I do know, based upon years of reading history (and not fiction and fantasy like the Harry Potter books).

Prayer goes hand-in-hand with hope; and America was founded by men deeply governed by their hope and prayer and belief in God.

The Founding Fathers established the United States, wrote the Declaration of Independence; the Bill of Rights and the Constitution; and created a nation firmly rooted in the belief in God and freedom of religion protected by the separation of church and state.

Many of the Founders and their forefathers fled Europe to escape religious persecution.  They wanted this new nation to allow them freedom of religion and thus the very nation is rooted in a belief in God.

The Declaration of Independence starts this way: “When in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the Earth, the separate and equal station to which the laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

After signing the Declaration of Independence, Samuel Adams, who was called “the firebrand of the American Revolution,” affirmed his obedience to God by stating, “We have this day restored the Sovereign to whom alone men ought to be obedient. From the rising to the setting of the sun, may His kingdom come.”

James Madison, the fourth president, made the following statement, “We have staked the whole of all our political institutions upon the capacity of mankind for self-government, upon the capacity of each and all of us to govern ourselves, to control ourselves, to sustain ourselves according to the Ten Commandments of God.”

Madison is often referred to as “The Father of Our Constitution.”
Page one of the original copy of the Constitution
Page one of the original copy of the Constitution

When historians at the University of Houston conducted a 10-year study of the ideas that shaped our republic, they found 94 percent of the Founding Fathers’ quotes in 15,000 documents were based on the Bible.

“God created all men equal,” one of the most fundamental and important acclamations of our government, became an underlying reason for the Civil War, a fundamental reason for the Emancipation Proclamation and a keynote of equality ever since.

Every president of the United States is sworn into office, by reciting an oath while he has one hand on the Bible. The oath ends, “So help me God.”

Every session of Congress since 1777 commenced with a prayer by a minister paid by the taxpayers. (Just today my wife and I attended Catholic Mass at the “Cathedral” adjacent to Catholic University in Washington D.C.  The celebrant was the Catholic Chaplain to the U.S. Congress.)

Every military service of the United States pays uniformed religious ministers for the officers and men in service. These ministers are from all faiths that recognize the importance of God in human life.  Nearly every base has a chapel.

The Ten Commandments are carved into the doors of the Supreme Court and appear prominently in the court’s chambers.Every piece of U.S. currency bears the words “In God We Trust.”

In America, you are even free to start your own religion. Nobody (except possibly the Internal Revenue Service) will interfere, so long as you don’t do anything outside the normal bounds of decent behavior.

So, as we all celebrate the blessings of American freedom, justice and government every day, perhaps we should reflect upon the roots and tenets of our democracy. We are not a Godless people. Or are we?

Yes, our democracy is evolving and we are open and accepting to that evolution. But let us not allow the evolution to turn into a careless revolution or even an unintended erosion of the principles by which we live and we are governed.I am one of those historians that thinks the Founders were pretty smart. Their belief in God, hope and prayer encourages me every day.

Sadly, some and maybe many in our society have moved away from a belief in God and toward beliefs in other things. Money? Drugs? Sex? Harry Potter? I don’t know what all.

I just think there is some merit in reviewing the work of our Founders. It’s time well spent. And certainly time better spent than reading Harry Potter.

The essay that prompted the one above is:
Harry Potter: More Worthless Pop Culture

Related:
Priest Says Harry Potter Helps Devil, Evil

“The great good news about America — The American gospel, if you will – is that religion shapes the life of the nation without strangling it. Belief in God is central to the country’s experience, yet for the broad center faith is a matter of choice, not coercion and the legacy of the Founding is that the center holds.”
–John Meacham, managing editor of Newsweek, is also the author of, American Gospel: God, the Founding Fathers and the Making of a Nation.

Harry Potter: More Worthless Pop Culture

July 22, 2007

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
July 23, 2007

I may be the only one in America that isn’t fond of Harry Potter. In fact, I find the book series a time wasting distraction that leads kids towards fantasy and novels and away from much greater reading learning experiences and challenges: like world or American history.

On February 28, 2004, American historian Daniel Boorstin died. On that same day, local high school students on the TV quiz show “It’s Academic,” in Washington D.C., failed to even make a guess at the answer to a simple question about the American Civil War and Fort Sumter.

So you may say, “why is the Civil War so important?” The saving of one continental nation? The emancipation of the slaves? Are there no lessons here about determination, dedication and perseverance for our children to learn?

Boorstin: lawyer, head of the Library of Congress for 12 years, faculty member of the University of Chicago for 25 years, and writer more than 20 books was a spectacular American worth “knowing” though his works. His famous trilogy on the American experience, U.S.A., gave us deep lessons into who we are as Americans.

Boorstin was a man of depth and merit who left us a legacy.

I hate to rain on anyone’s parade, but Harry Potter is not the best use of a child’s time or brain.

Harry Potter is just one more waste of time on top of so many video games, T.V. shows and other horrible uses of wonderful tools like the human mind, the imagination, the intellect and the computers that makes us tick: ourselves and our fellow Americans.

Since there are only 24 hours in each day, and many of those hours are already packed full of clutter and entertainment, I am generally not in favor of more that disassociates people from reality.  Especially those masters of the future universe, our children, should be encouraged to take a bite out of real life a little more often.  The current diet of pop culture is too heavy in what clogs the veins and mind.

Ever wonder why American history, values and society are no longer a mainstay of American schools and media? Because many of the Founders were unusually talented super-achievers and every single one was a firm believer in The Almighty.

Today: your kids’ teachers want them talking about abortion, sex education and gay marriage but certainly not God or the values, traditions and history that made America great. In fact, most of our corps of teachers are liberal and not conservative and don’t really believe that America is great (if it ever was, they say).

And there is another subliminal message: YOU CANNOT EVER be a super-achiever yourself.

We are treating our children to a brainwashing of mediocrity.
Photo
Chinese students take an exam en-masse.

History is filled with super-achievers, inventors, military leaders, scientists and researchers. History teaches that money is not always the most valuable commodity or goal.

American history teaches us the values, rights and responsibilities of our citizenship. History makes us a nation: a race of people and not just a collision of different peoples from many lands.

You can be born French, but when you move in from another land you don’t necessarily become French. When you move to America and become a citizen, you are embraced as an American.

People come here to share in the values and rights of all Americans. Yet we, as parents and teachers, neglect them or even undermine them.

Understanding who gained those American rights and how they achieved them is important because those rights bind us together as a people.

Our history is “Ich bin ein Berliner,” the Boston Tea Party, Ellis Island, Posk Chop Hill, Gettysburg, and “I have a dream.” Our history is the Emancipation Proclamation, Bill of Rights, and Constitution.

Our history is our culture. Our focus upon Paris Hilton, Janet Jackson, “Lord of the Rings,” and, yes, Harry Potter himself, is fleeting, largely meaningless debris. The liberties gained by our history are lasting and binding and allow us a free Hollywood entertainment machine. But you can’t learn history from Michael Moore and Oliver Stone.

How many kids in your child’s classroom know that George Washington was an accomplished horticulturist who created hybrid plants and made his own wine? How many can appreciate the architectural genius of Thomas Jefferson? How many know that Benjamin Franklin charted the ocean’s currents on his way to Europe to serve as an Ambassador?

Do your children know that a Black Man and former slave named Frederick Douglass was instrumental in freeing the slaves and became one of the finest orators of his time? And how many can discuss Mark Twain: another world renown orator? How many know what an orator IS?

How many of your children know that Black Men like Christian Fleetwood were awarded the Medal of Honor during the Civil War? How many know what the Medal of Honor is and what it means?

How many of your children can articulate even one story of an American immigrant super-achiever like Henry Villard: a German speaking immigrant who became one of the finest English language journalists of his day and then rose to become an American Tycoon?

In fact: our American story is filled with super-achievers. Real men and women who were super achievers. Who needs novels and stories of fantasy when the facts of our predecessors from all races and all places is tremendously enlightening and challenging?

Our history teaches us toughness and serenity. Through history we learn the dichotomies of man and the strange bedfellows life brings. We learn that Great Britain, George Bush’s greatest ally in Iraq, is also the nation that burned the White House and the U.S. Capitol in 1814. And yet the Republic survived. So what really did the nation have to fear on September 11, 2001? Fear itself? And who coined that phrase?

And the history of man, world history, teaches us how tribes became cultures and nations.

Madam Curie, Robert Fulton, Robert Peary, Jonas Salk, George Washington Carver, Charles Lindbergh, Albert Einstein and so many more through history offer all of us, and especially our children, lessons in life.

And the stories of these people may inspire future greatness among our children.

History makes us appreciate what it means to be an American and our history compels us read. But don’t read your kids’ history textbooks. They are often politically correct collections of facts and misinterpretation not worth reading. Understanding history, like mining, requires one to dig deep into the writings of and about great men, at least occasionally.

Ignoring our history belittles the greatness of our nation. It also insults the intelligence of our children. By building a national generation of pop culture worshipers instead of a generation of dedicated super-achievers we send the message that Michael Vick and Paris Hilton are really valuable and important.

Is this what we really want?

I don’t like Harry Potter one bit. It is another piece of pop culture trash that detracts from reality instead of embracing it.

Sorry to rain on anyone’s parade but if we as a nation and a culture continue to loudly applaud the stuff that makes the barn floor slippery we can expect a lot more slippery stuff in our society.

Related:
Kids reading fewer books despite Harry Potter hoopla

Priest Says Harry Potter Helps Devil, Evil

Reading American history about the early years of America and the Founders is enlightening…..
Our Nation: Based Upon God, Not Fiction

++++++++++++++++++++++++

An open letter to Free Republic readers and others linking to this article:

Here are a few ideas to consider as you attack my ideas.

–I do not believe that money equals value. In other words, Pet Rocks made a lot of money for someone but we are still a ways from curing cancer. Paris Hilton and Michael Vick have made a lot of money, but in many places they would not be welcome near children…..

–I very much do agree that reading is important (as the essay clearly says). But reading garbage is a waste of time. Harry Potter is 5 books. Those have been blockbusters. Great. But that has not translated into more readership overall. Despite Harry Potter, readership, especially teen readership, is in a steep decline.

Kids reading fewer books despite Harry Potter hoopla

–My recommendation for parent younger than …well, my age…is that they start to attack their schools. If teachers think the learning/reading dilemma is solved with Sir Harry they are wildly off the mark. In fact, off the reservation.

Finally, I hope people will read Part II of this essay which deals with our national well being and understanding America’s Founders and roots.

Part II:
Our Nation: Based Upon God, Not Fiction

All the best to everyone.

Kids reading fewer books despite Harry Potter hoopla

July 20, 2007

Despite what has been dubbed the “Harry Potter Effect” — which credits J.K. Rowling’s blockbuster book series with turning Game Boy addicts into lifelong readers — reading is in serious decline among teens nationwide, according to a forthcoming federal study.

A decade of Potter-mania peaks at 12:01 a.m. Saturday, when 12 million copies of the seventh and last book, “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows,” go on sale in the United States. Thus far, the books have sold 325 million copies in 64 languages worldwide.

But as educators assess the phenomenon that lured millions of young readers to tackle longer books, they find that Harry Potter alone could not stem the decline in reading rates.

Read the rest:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/07/15/MNGN7R0Q1N1.DTL&hw=
reading+potter+benson&sn=002&sc=189