Archive for the ‘guest worker’ Category

The Insidious Nature of Human Trafficking: Vietnam

January 12, 2008
By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
January 12, 2008
.
The government of communist Vietnam and a lot of their fellows in business with Vietnam are not going to like this much but it should be known that Vietnam is a state sponsor of human trafficking.The veneer of “disgust over human trafficking by the government of Vietnam” looks like this: a crackdown on human trafficking covers over Vietnam’s worst offenses. The article from Than Nien News on December 26, 2007 (see the article “Human Trafficking Crackdown in Vietnam” below) is a fine example of how the official, state controlled media paints a picture of righteousness and propriety against human trafficking inside Vietnam.The truth is that the communist government of Vietnam sanctions and profits from human trafficking.

Just yesterday, January 11, 2008, an article ran in Nhan Dan, a Vietnamese Communist State News Service, under the banner headline “Vietnam and Qatar Sign Labor Co-Operation Pact.”

The article states, in part, that an “agreement was inked by Minister of Labour, War Invalids and Social Affairs, Nguyen Thi Kim Ngan and Qatar Minister of labour and State Social Affairs Sultan Bin Hassan Al-Dhabit Al-Dosari.”

Nguyen Thi Kim Ngan is a criminal who made a lot of money on this deal. She is a madam if you prefer kindness. In fact, she is a slave trader.

The article continues, “The Qatar government has licensed its businesses to recruit an additional 25,000 Vietnamese workers besides the current 10,000. The country plans to increase the number of Vietnamese guest workers to 100,000 within the next three years.”

There is no mention of any people from Qatar traveling to Vietnam to work.

Here is what happens to a “guest worker” who arrives in Qatar. Upon arrival, the “guest worker’s” passport and other papers are confiscated. The best looking young women are assigned to work in brothels and other businesses that are hidden by a veneer of propriety. Many of the girls are told they are “entertainers.” It doesn’t take long to realize this means prostitute.

Other women are assigned as “domestics” and work as maids in private households. These women are routinely raped or expected to “service” the master of the house regularly.

Anyone attempting to escape from this system of state sponsored exploitation will find his or her photograph published in the newspaper with a caption like this: “Hong Nguyen has run away from her rightful employer at 5623 Persian Gulf Way. She is a Vietnamese national without passport or travel documents. She is an illegal alien in Qatar. Any person coming into contact with this criminal should notify the police at this phone number: ( ****). Her employer has offered a reward for her return to lawful work in the guest worker program.”

When I passed the main state police station in Qatar, one of my hosts opined, “That is the building where people go in and never come out.”

Men who arrive in oil-rich Arab nations like Qatar suffer a similar fate. They work 14-20 hours a day in the most miserable conditions. American dogs have a MUCH better life than these human beings.

Another of Vietnam’s state sponsored human trafficking scams is the marriage brokering business. Young women are promised better lives, good money and a nice life style if they marry a foreigner. Foreign men line up to look over hundreds of pretty, young, naïve, willing and submissive women. The men are often from South Korea, China, or Taiwan.

The government of Vietnam makes a little money from every “marriage.” The men pay a fee gladly.

Once the Vietnamese “wives” are in their new homes in Taiwan or elsewhere, their passports are confiscated and they often become sex slaves. Abuse of these young people is terrible — too terrible to describe here.

If the young “wife” escapes, she has no local language skills and is unlikely to find a decent job because she has no documents and is obviously an illegal alien.

So it is our suggestion that readers dismiss the glowing reports from Vietnam and other countries engaged in exporting human beings for profit. That is called human trafficking and is one of the most despicable crimes against humanity.

****

“You have enemies? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.”
— Winston Churchill

Human Trafficking Crackdown in Vietnam 

Local authorities will intensify their operations in 2008 to stop the trafficking of women and children across the Chinese/Cambodian
border.

Ministry of Public Security Vice Director of Social Order and Crime Investigations, Colonel Dang Quoc Nhat, said, women and children smuggling in Vietnam is very serious and complicated, requiring increasingly cunning methods.

As many as 900 human trafficking cases involving 1,600 traffickers and 2,200 smuggled women and children were detected from 2005-2007.

Police and border guards have also uncovered several rings that trafficked women and children from Vietnam via Laos to Thailand, Africa or Europe to be sex workers. Economic difficulties, unemployment and poor education, especially in mountainous and remote areas, were the major factors in the trafficking increase.

Adapted from: “Human Trafficking Crackdown.” Thanh Nien News, 26 December 2007.

Related:
http://www.humantrafficking.org/updates/768

http://www.humantrafficking.org/

Vietnam and Qatar sign labor co-operation pact

Vietnam to send 100,000 migrant workers to Qatar

Advertisements