Archive for the ‘greenhouse gasses’ Category

Japan to buy China emissions quotas

January 3, 2008

 TOKYO (AFP) – Japan has agreed to buy greenhouse gas emissions quotas from China as part of efforts to meet its Kyoto Protocol target, the Yomiuri Shimbun reported on Thursday.

A Chinese man flies a kite as a heavy fog blankets Tiananmen ...
 A Chinese man flies a kite as a heavy fog blankets Tiananmen Square in Beijing, 27 December 2007. Japan has agreed to buy greenhouse gas emissions quotas from China as part of efforts to meet its Kyoto Protocol target, the Yomiuri Shimbun reported on Thursday. (AFP/Teh Eng Koon)
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The two countries will seek a formal accord on the plan during Chinese President Hu Jintao‘s visit to Japan, scheduled for late March, the newspaper said.

Japan plans to use the so-called clean development mechanism, under which industrialised countries can fund projects to cut greenhouse gas emissions in developing countries and offset these reductions against their own output

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080103/bs_afp/
climatejapanchina_080103040351

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Bush, China’s Hu tackle thorny issues

September 6, 2007

By Tom Raum, Associated Press 

SYDNEY, Australia – President Bush and Chinese President Hu Jintao tackled contentious issues on Thursday, from climate change and Iran and North Korea to recalls of tainted Chinese food and individual freedoms in China.

“He’s an easy man to talk to. I’m very comfortable in my discussions with President Hu,” Bush said after a face-to-face meeting that lasted about 90 minutes on the sidelines of an Asia-Pacific economic summit.

Hu called the discussion “candid and friendly,” even though it touched on deep U.S.-Chinese differences.

Read it all:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070906/ap_
on_re_au_an/bush;_ylt=AuvBrL_
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What Does Beijing’s Central Government Consider a “Threat”?

August 6, 2007

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
First Published July 29, 2007
Updated August 6, 2007

In China, the people have no right of assembly or to free speech. The media is severely limited and the central government would prefer that the only voice of the media in China came from the state agency: Xinhua.

The government of Beijing is increasingly worried about and sensitive to assemblies of groups and potential for disorder.

No To AIDS Conference

China just today cancelled an HIV/AIDS conference and seminar.

“Authorities informed us that the combination of AIDS, law and foreigners was too sensitive,” Sara Davis, on the organizers of the conference told Reuters.

The nations invited, and presumably these were the nations China objected to, were: South Africa, India, the United States, Canada and Thailand.

Catholic Priests Detained

In another case of China’s paranoia, several Catholic priests were detained this weekend. Their crime? China’s 12 million Catholics share the same basic religious beliefs but are politically divided between “above-ground” churches approved by the ruling Communist Party and “underground” churches that reject government ties. The priests detained are said to be from the “underground church.”

A picture begins to emerge of a communist Chinese government that does not permit gatherings of just a handful of people unless the government has approved both the topic of discussion and the participants.

Since the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown, China has been at least extremely sensitive and some might say paranoid about groups, assembly and free speech.

Any hint of not following Beijing to the letter is termed “social instability.”


Communist Vietnam’s proven method
of silencing a prisoner.  Father Ly just
before he was removed from court.  He
had no representation at trial

Illegal Government Land Grabbing

Government “appropriation” (or rather, misappropriation) of peasant farms and other lands is the largest root source of assemblies, riots, other forms of civil unrest and “social instability.”

“This is the foremost issue in rural areas and probably the most contentious issue leading to social unrest in China today,” Nicholas Bequelin, a Hong Kong-based China researcher with Human Rights Watch said.

The issue of the illegal seizure of land by thge government is also the single most important reason for protests in Vietnam.

There were 130,000 cases of illegal land grabs last year in China, an increase of 17.3 percent from 2005, the land ministry said in March.

Mr. Bequelin said these 130,000 are just the reported cases. He believes there may be 100,000 other cases or more. He noted past official estimates that 50-60 percent of all land deals in China were illegal, rising to 90 percent in many places.

“The crux of the issue is that governments at all levels plunder the land resources, the commoners see little if any of the money and violators get off scot-free,” said Hou Guoyan, a retired professor from the China University of Political Science and Law.

Beijing has also issued a series of regulations aimed at increasing scrutiny, but experts say the central government does not have enough power to enforce the law in the provinces.

“The (central) government is at a loss to solve the problem,” Hou said.

This is the “social instability” Beijing fears.

Enforcing ‘State Policy’

The central government is also having a great deal of trouble enforcing many other of its own communist state policies.

Earlier this year, in Bobai county in the region of Guangxi, thousands of villagers rioted, burning cars and clashing with police, after being fined for breaching the one-child policy.

China allows couples to only bring into the world one child. Villagers in Bobai were violating this rule. When police cracked down to enforce the law, violence erupted.

Central Beijing was caught off guard and proved itself completely incapable of an appropriate response.

Then, on August 5, 2007, China’s official Xinhua News Agency reported the nation’s top family planning agency has cracked down on crude and insensitive slogans used by rural authorities to enforce the country’s strict population limits.

Slogans such as ‘Raise fewer babies but more piggies,’ and ‘One more baby means one more tomb,’ have been forbidden and a list of 190 acceptable slogans issued by the National Population and Family Planning Commission, the official Xinhua News Agency reported.

After the “One Child Riot,” Beijing authorities found out about the ugly and demeaning slogans from rioters.  Beijing bureaucrats admitted they had no idea how the “One Child Policy” was being administered or policed in the countryside.

Other incidents of people in the countryside ignoring Beijing are common.

Pollution Regulations IgnoredAfter China pledged to contain and even reduce its huge pollution problem and its contributions to greenhouse gases, the people in the countryside were disturbed. When the new environmental requirements trickled down to the provinces and the countryside, they were and are being ignored.

Local governments in China are continuing to invest in dirty, resource-intense industries, jeopardizing Beijing’s goals of saving energy and cutting pollution. Some regions are encouraging steel, cement and other heavy industries to boost economic growth despite demands from Beijing to rein in those sectors, the China Daily newspaper reported.

When it first became apparent that local governments were ignoring Beijing on pollution issues, Beijing threatened local communist leaders. Their promotions were tied to environments goals. But this scheme was an utter failure. Fearing a total revolt of local communist officials, Beijing rescinded the edict on July 21, 2007.
Photo

In other cases of a disconnect between Beijing and the countryside, good intentions can go horribly wrong.

In 2005, Chinese farmers, acting with the approval and encouragement of government officials, tried to suppress major bird flu outbreaks among chickens with an antiviral drug meant for humans, animal health experts said. International researchers concluded that this is why the drug will no longer protect people in case of a worldwide bird flu epidemic.

Summer Olympics 2008

China is already preparing to “manage and control” crowds, assembly and protests at next summer’s Beijing Olympics. The gathering of information on foreigners who might mount protests and spoil the nation’s moment in the spotlight has already commenced. The central Beijing government is already preparing lists of potentially troublesome foreign organizations, looking beyond the human rights groups long critical of Beijing.

Among those targeted as “potential protest and assembly groups”? American Evangelical Christians.

China watchers we have been in contact with cited this as another example of Beijing’s paranoia.

But Beijing defends its actions as necessary for the safety of all involved in the Olympics, even Americans.

“Demonstrations of all kinds are a concern, including anti-American demonstrations,” said the consultant, who works for Beijing’s Olympic organizers and asked not to be identified because he was not authorized to talk to the media.

The government, he said, is “trying to find out what kinds of NGOs will come. … What are their plans?”

While foreign governments often monitor potentially disruptive groups ahead of big events, Beijing this time is ranging farther afield, targeting groups whose activities would be considered legal in most countries.
Photo

Local Communist Authorities Threatened

During the first week of July 2007, China ordered local authorities to address the root causes of rising public discontent, according to state media sources. China watchers consider this yet another sign of growing concern over social stability from Beijing.

Local officials have been told they will be denied promotions unless they minimize social unrest in their areas, Xinhua news agency quoted a top Community Party official as saying.

In summary, the communist government in Beijing is insisting on total control of all its 1.3 billion people and its vast countryside. But in many cases, China’s central government in Beijing is being resisted or ignored.

Should these tendencies persists, it certainly means additional violence could be possible inside China.
Beijing is rushing to make its air clean for the 2008 Olympics, but experts say it will be impossible for the site to be totally safe for athletes at the global sporting event.

China: So Big, So Powerful, So Disorganized, So Corrupt

China Plans Happy Olympics But A Few “Small” Problems Remain

What Does Beijing’s Communist Central Government Consider a “Threat”?

July 29, 2007

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
July 29, 2007

In China, the people have no right of assembly or to free speech. The media is severely limited and the central government would prefer that the only voice of the media in China came from the state agency: Xinhua.

The government of Beijing is increasingly worried about and sensitive to assemblies of groups and potential for disorder.

No To AIDS Conference

China just today cancelled an HIV/AIDS conference and seminar.

“Authorities informed us that the combination of AIDS, law and foreigners was too sensitive,” Sara Davis, on the organizers of the conference told Reuters.

The nations invited, and presumably these were the nations China objected to, were: South Africa, India, the United States, Canada and Thailand.

Catholic Priests Detained

In another case of China’s paranoia, several Catholic priests were detained this weekend. Their crime? China’s 12 million Catholics share the same basic religious beliefs but are politically divided between “above-ground” churches approved by the ruling Communist Party and “underground” churches that reject government ties. The priests detained are said to be from the “underground church.”

A picture begins to emerge of a communist Chinese government that does not permit gatherings of just a handful of people unless the government has approved both the topic of discussion and the participants.

Since the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown, China has been at least extremely sensitive and some might say paranoid about groups, assembly and free speech.

Any hint of not following Beijing to the letter is termed “social instability.”


Communist Vietnam’s proven method
of silencing a prisoner.  Father Ly just
before he was removed from court.  He
had no representation at trial

Illegal Government Land Grabbing

Government “appropriation” (or rather, misappropriation) of peasant farms and other lands is the largest root source of assemblies, riots, other forms of civil unrest and “social instability.”

“This is the foremost issue in rural areas and probably the most contentious issue leading to social unrest in China today,” Nicholas Bequelin, a Hong Kong-based China researcher with Human Rights Watch said.

The issue of the illegal seizure of land by thge government is also the single most important reason for protests in Vietnam.

There were 130,000 cases of illegal land grabs last year in China, an increase of 17.3 percent from 2005, the land ministry said in March.

Mr. Bequelin said these 130,000 are just the reported cases. He believes there may be 100,000 other cases or more. He noted past official estimates that 50-60 percent of all land deals in China were illegal, rising to 90 percent in many places.

“The crux of the issue is that governments at all levels plunder the land resources, the commoners see little if any of the money and violators get off scot-free,” said Hou Guoyan, a retired professor from the China University of Political Science and Law.

Beijing has also issued a series of regulations aimed at increasing scrutiny, but experts say the central government does not have enough power to enforce the law in the provinces.

“The (central) government is at a loss to solve the problem,” Hou said.

This is the “social instability” Beijing fears.

Enforcing ‘State Policy’

The central government is also having a great deal of trouble enforcing many other of its own communist state policies.

Earlier this year, in Bobai county in the region of Guangxi, thousands of villagers rioted, burning cars and clashing with police, after being fined for breaching the one-child policy.

China allows couples to only bring into the world one child. Villagers in Bobai were violating this rule. When police cracked down to enforce the law, violence erupted.

Central Beijing was caught off guard and proved itself completely incapable of an appropriate response.

Other incidents of people in the countryside ignoring Beijing are common.

Pollution Regulations Ignored

After China pledged to contain and even reduce its huge pollution problem and its contributions to greenhouse gases, the people in the countryside were disturbed. When the new environmental requirements trickled down to the provinces and the countryside, they were and are being ignored.Local governments in China are continuing to invest in dirty, resource-intense industries, jeopardizing Beijing’s goals of saving energy and cutting pollution. Some regions are encouraging steel, cement and other heavy industries to boost economic growth despite demands from Beijing to rein in those sectors, the China Daily newspaper reported.

When it first became apparent that local governments were ignoring Beijing on pollution issues, Beijing threatened local communist leaders. Their promotions were tied to environments goals.

But this scheme was an utter failure. Fearing a total revolt of local communist officials, Beijing rescinded the edict on July 21, 2007.
Photo

Summer Olympics 2008

China is already preparing to “manage and control” crowds, assembly and protests at next summer’s Beijing Olympics. The gathering of information on foreigners who might mount protests and spoil the nation’s moment in the spotlight has already commenced. The central Beijing government is already preparing lists of potentially troublesome foreign organizations, looking beyond the human rights groups long critical of Beijing.

Among those targeted as “potential protest and assembly groups”? American Evangelical Christians.

China watchers we have been in contact with cited this as another example of Beijing’s paranoia.

But Beijing defends its actions as necessary for the safety of all involved in the Olympics, even Americans.

“Demonstrations of all kinds are a concern, including anti-American demonstrations,” said the consultant, who works for Beijing’s Olympic organizers and asked not to be identified because he was not authorized to talk to the media.

The government, he said, is “trying to find out what kinds of NGOs will come. … What are their plans?”

While foreign governments often monitor potentially disruptive groups ahead of big events, Beijing this time is ranging farther afield, targeting groups whose activities would be considered legal in most countries.
Photo

Local Communist Authorities Threatened

During the first week of July 2007, China ordered local authorities to address the root causes of rising public discontent, according to state media sources. China watchers consider this yet another sign of growing concern over social stability from Beijing.

Local officials have been told they will be denied promotions unless they minimize social unrest in their areas, Xinhua news agency quoted a top Community Party official as saying.

In summary, the communist government in Beijing is insisting on total control of all its 1.3 billion people and its vast countryside. But in many cases, China’s central government in Beijing is being resisted or ignored.

Should these tendencies persists, it certainly means additional violence could be possible inside China.
Beijing is rushing to make its air clean for the 2008 Olympics, but experts say it will be impossible for the site to be totally safe for athletes at the global sporting event.

China powering world economy

July 26, 2007

By Patrice Hill
The Washington Times
July 26, 2007

China, this year for the first time, has dislodged the United States from its long reign as the main engine of global economic growth, with its more than 11 percent growth eclipsing sputtering U.S. growth of about 2 percent, according to the International Monetary Fund’s 2007 projections released yesterday.

China’s growth, which has been fueled by booming domestic building and commercial development, as well as soaring exports, has accelerated even as U.S. growth dropped to 0.7 percent in the first quarter under the weight of a profound housing recession. China is expected to drive a hearty 5.2 percent expansion of the global economy this year, the IMF said.

Read the rest:
http://washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070726/BUSINESS/107260073/1001
Because credit cards in China have low limits and few stores take them, they are more popular as fashion statements than financial tools.

Related:
To The U.S. Treasury Secretary: China Is Your Worst Nightmare, Sir

To The U.S. Treasury Secretary: China Is Your Worst Nightmare, Sir

July 25, 2007

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
Updated July 26, 2007

On July 25, 2007, the International Monetary Fund released its 2007 projections.  Those numbers indicate that China, this year for the first time, has dislodged the United States from its long reign as the main engine of global economic growth, with its more than 11 percent growth eclipsing sputtering U.S. growth of about 2 percent.

Faced with that information, next week the U.S. Treasury Secretary, Henry Paulson, visits China. He plans to engage in discussions on a host of topics including trade, the balance of trade, global warming and the environment, Intellectual Property Rights (copyrights, licenses and other protections), and, one would expect, the way China deals with the exports it sends our way.

A host of tainted and harmful products from lead-based paint covered toys to poisonous anti-freeze laced toothpaste has to be looming large over next week’s meetings, even if Paulson doesn’t raise the issue.

Henry M. Paulson
Henry Paulson

Mr. Paulson must be feeing significant pressure. If he isn’t, we’ll just reiterate here the things that should give any thinking U.S. Treasury Secretary nightmares instead of a good night’s sleep as he jets his way to Beijing.

Yet Mr. Paulson is usually optimistic on China.

Where many Americans see threats posed by the Asian giant’s growing economic might, Paulson often sees opportunity.

“The fact that they’re the world’s fastest growing economy is something that some people (see) as a problem. I look at that as an opportunity that I’d like to capture,” he said, adding China was the fastest growing market for U.S.-made goods and services.

Congress

The US Congress has complained for several years about China’s undervalued currency, the lack of intellectual property protection in China, over-reliance on subsidies, and several other issues. The Treasury Secretary, in interviews and in documents has said over and over that he is committed to solving “issues of concern to the US Congress.”

One of the most troubling parts of China’s economic policy, from the point of view of the U.S. Congress, is the undervaluation of the yuan. This has been a particular political sore point with no less than three bills dealing with China’s currency policy scheduled for Congressional action this year. Many in Congress want sanctions imposed upon China for its monetary policy. Yet Mr. Paulson has, in the past, been highly effective at convincing the Congress to delay legislation that would sanction China over currency.
Flag of the People's Republic of China

While in China, one might expect Mr. Paulson to lay out the complexity of the difficulty he faces with the Congress, in the hope that China will alleviate his pain.

Global Warming and Environment

The United Nations has condemned China for the worst pollution in the world. China also produces more greenhouse gases than any other nation by far. But China is a world class polluter: many of her rivers are polluted and even much of the ground water is no longer safe. More than 70 percent of the waterways and 90 percent of the underground water is polluted, Chinese experts say.  Almost nowhere in the world is global warming more apparent: and Secretary Paulson will start his discussions with his Chinese hosts at Qinghai Lake.For a millennia this saltwater lake has been the home to some of China’s most beautiful birds. Black-necked cranes, Siberian swans and black cormorants are among 189 species that spend part of each year here hunting and building nests near the homes of Tibetan families.

But Chinese scientists believe global warming is to blame for a steep decline in the bird populations and types.

“Global warming has become a reality here,” said Chen Dongmei, director of the World Wildlife Fund’s climate change and energy program in China. “Everyone can feel that there has been a change in Beijing’s attitude toward climate change over the past few years.”

Secretary Paulson fully understands this issue. “The only way to make progress on climate change is to engage all the large economies, developed and developing, to work toward embracing cleaner technology and reducing emissions,” Paulson said in a statement. “What’s happening with the environment in the middle of China not only affects the local climate and economy but also the global climate and economy.”

Though Beijing has imposed rigid pollution and greenhouse gas emission limits local governments are continuing to invest in dirty, resource-intense industries, jeopardizing Beijing’s goals of saving energy and cutting pollution.

On Monday, July 23, , the China Daily newspaper reported that some regions are encouraging steel, cement and other heavy industries to boost economic growth despite demands from Beijing to rein in those sectors. The central government in Beijing is being ignored.

“The central government is committed to achieving the (green) targets but some local governments have turned a blind eye to them,” said He Bingguang, a deputy director with the National Development and Reform Commission.

This is a dilemma Secretary Paulson will share with his number one host, President Hu Jintao. Both men should be uncomfortable with this tar baby: a problem seemingly too large to solve.

胡锦涛
Hu Jintao
Hu Jintao

Intellectual Property Rights

This has been a stumbling point between the two nations for a long time. American writers, film makers, computer software engineers and a host of others involved in the creative process of producing “intellectual property” expect that patents, copyrights, licenses, and other protections will ensure their work is not copied or stolen without proper reimbursement.

Chinese “entrepreneurs” do not believe in these copyright laws and freely copy just about everything for resale on the street.

China accounted for about 80 percent of the 14,775 shipments of counterfeit goods seized at U.S. ports last year, said W. Ralph Basham, commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

I can remember buying pirated (illegally copied) expensive books in China in the 1970s. Books like the famous Oxford English Dictionary (OED), a tome that would cost hundreds of dollars in London, sold for just a few measly bucks in China. As I student I wanted reference books (this was before the internet, kids) and there was no place where reference books were less expensive than China. That was because the Chinese cared nothing for copyright laws or other such niceties.

Today, the U.S. is still deadlocked with China in bitter negotiations over Intellectual Property Rights.

Secretary Paulson will have his work cut out for him also because China feels defensive right now. The product safety scandal, which featured everything from tainted toys to tainted seafood, sent an alarm bell through China’s leadership. Just yesterday, the European Commission said, in so many words, that China’s promises to take corrective action haven’t resulted in the action Europe expected. And in Panama, lawmakers believe poisoned Chinese cough syrup killed more than 100 people.

International experts caution that there will be no arm twisting of the Beijing government by outsiders; especially on human rights and what Beijing considers “internal policy matters.”

Han Dongfang, the Hong Kong-based labor rights activist for the China Labour Bulletin organization, which monitors workers’ rights in China, insists “It’s about markets and it’s about cheap labor … Labor rights have become worse over the past few years.”

“The Chinese leadership does not care about international pressure. It is not China who is knocking at the door of the international community looking for favors — it is the other way around,” Han says.

Every indication is that this will be at least a somewhat tense meeting between Mr. Paulson and his Chinese hosts. Both sides will share the tension.

A Treasury Department insider told Peace and Freedom: “This is a tough diplomatic mission. But Secretary Paulson is a big boy and well versed in the issues. He’ll be successful and he’ll sleep.”

We’ll know if that is true, in part, at the end of next week.

Related:

China powering world economy

We documented many of the issues between the U.S. and China here:
China Planning a Surreal Facade for Summer Olympic Games: Beijing 2008

China and the U.S. are cooperating on IPRs but the going has not always proven as fruitful as these stories indicate:

China, FBI make $500M software piracy bust

China fails to deliver on product safety: European watchdog

China’s Counterfeiting Legacy
(By Les Lothringer in ShangHai)

China says pirated DVD production lines smuggled in

Human rights questions remain for China

From July 27:
Senate Panel Indicates Readiness to “Squeeze China” Over Currency

China Planning a Surreal Facade for Summer Olympic Games: Beijing 2008

July 7, 2007

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
July 9, 2007

Few could have anticipated the run of bad publicity, crises and scandals that China has weathered since about last winter or spring.

First, pets in America became sick and many died. The illness was traced to Chinese-made pet food laced with a fertilizer component named melamine. Companies in China had illegally added melamine to wheat gluten and rice protein in a bid to meet the contractual demand for the amount of protein in the pet food products.

After that, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States began to take a harder look at a host of Chinese products imported into the U.S.

The FDA ended up barring most seafood from China (where we in the U.S. get about 1/3 of our shrimp, much of our catfish and other “farm raised” seafood products) because much of it contained drugs, bacteria or other suspicious or obviously harmful products.

Not only was imported seafood tainted, but the FDA began turning away tons of other food products – some of it contaminated, some filled with toxins and other products full of bacteria.

Products like toothpaste, chewing gum and even soy sauce were found to be made with toxic ingredients. Roughly 900,000 tubes of Chinese made toothpaste containing a poison used in some antifreeze products turned up in U.S. hospitals for the mentally ill, prisons, juvenile detention centers and even some hospitals serving the general population.

Then the Colgate-Palmolive Company announced that it had found counterfeit “Colgate” toothpaste containing the anti-freeze diethylene glycol, a syrupy poison.

Although tainted or poorly made and tested food from China was first noticed in the United States and other western nations, once China checked its own store shelves it found problems. 

Inspectors in southwest China’s Guangxi region found excessive additives and preservatives in nearly 40 percent of 100 children’s snacks sampled during the second quarter of 2007, according to a report on China’s central government Web site.

The snacks — including soft drinks, candied fruits, gelatin desserts and some types of crackers — were taken from 70 supermarkets, department stores and wholesale markets in seven cities in the region, it said.

Only 35 percent of gelatin desserts sampled met food standards, the report said, while two types of candied fruit contained 63 times the permitted amount of artificial sweetener.

And if substandard children’s snacks weren’t bad enough, China and the U.S. FDA uncovered a huge racket in substandard medicines. One manufacturer of medicines was implicated in 11 deaths.  Five manufactures lost the ability to continue in the business.  And 128 drug makers lost their Chinese government Good Manufacturing Practice certificates, a symbol of favorable performance, the China Daily newspaper reported on its Web site.

We also saw, thanks to an aroused international media, child laborers illegally producing Beijing Olympics 2008 memorabilia. Just when you thought it couldn’t get any worse for China, a slavery scandal erupted. Slaves were found mining materials and making bricks inside China.

The United Nations condemned China for the worst pollution in the world. China also produces more greenhouse gases than any other nation by far.

Despite China’s long history for managing its media and controlling what the world learned about the People’s Republic, stories surfaced and were verified that showed an illegal trade in “harvested” human organs from inside China. Unscrupulous doctors and businessmen teamed up to create a thriving business in human organs. The problem was that the organs came from prisoners and the mentally ill, who had no say in the matter and died before they could become witnesses to this atrocity.

Add to this a long and unresolved dispute about the way China controls its currency and a thriving business inside China in counterfeit goods: everything from U.S. music and motion pictures to Rolex watches, books and, well, you name it.

China tried to market a new Chinese made automobile to the upscale European buyer but the vehicle disintegrated in a 40 MPH crash test. Now Europeans wouldn’t be, well, caught dead in the thing.

So from May until July 2007, despite the Chinese News Spin Machine going full tilt the bad news about China seemed to be spinning out of control.

Just today, July 7, 2007, the Central Committee of the Communist Party seemed to be threatening local leaders who allow social unrest.  “Officials who perform poorly in maintaining social stability in rural areas will not be qualified for promotion,” Ouyang Song, a senior party official in charge of personnel matters said, according to China’s Official Communist News media.

All these problems don’t even trump China’s most horrible foreign policy disaster: Suport for Sudan without taking action on Darfur.  The U.N. and others have referred to Sudan’s conduct in Darfur as genocide.  And Hollywood big shots are already calling next summer’s Olympics in Beijing the “genocide games.” 

Not to worry, though. China’s communist leadership still plans a masterful and error free Beijing Olympics 2008.

The communist government of China is taking action to streamline what the western media sees next summer. Smokey, coal-fired factories are even being moved out of Beijing and into the countryside because their effluent looks so disgusting there was fear these factories alone could cause a major embarrassment.

Beijing’s population had a practice “No Spiting Day” in an effort to reduce this disgusting habit common in the city. The test was a disastrous failure and a new training approach is planned. Beijing also had a day devoted to polite lining up for buses and trains. This worked out a little better with the obedient and terrified city workers not taking any chances.

During the Olympics, communist leaders in Beijing plan to remove from the city the hordes of vagrants, homeless people and orphaned children who live on Beijing’s streets. Some estimate that as many as 2 million orphaned or homeless children live in Beijing alone.

In order to assess what can be done about Beijing’s choked streets overwhelmed by traffic; and to see if a dent can be made in the choking air pollution, one million Beijing automobile drivers will have to stay at home or use mass transit on a day scheduled to test the impact of all of this. Beijing only has 3 million registered automobiles so inconveniencing one-third of them for one day should hardly impact the economy, right? But if the test is a success, one would have to remind China that the Olympics is not a one day event.

When all this is assessed together, one might ask, when we get to Beijing next summer for the Olympic Games, how much of what we see will be real? And how much is a product of the smoke and mirrors China often employs to produce the desired result.

Related:

Pollution Dangers Cast Shadow over 2008 Olympics

Chinese Government Staff: “Happy News President Hu Jintao; We Ready For Happy Time Olympics!”

Some National Cultures More Tolerant of Death?

Tricky Vietnamese Truth About Catfish
The Chinese are just as smart as the Vietnamese on how to work the American system….

China says food safety scares threaten stability

China’s “Drug Abuse” Problem: Below Standard Pharmaceuticals Have Been Deadly

China may need a fresh approach to regulating its often unruly economy

China tells local authorities to address social instability

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From John Carey: A friend sent us this:

Friend:

I was in a Beijing hotel last year… A very upscale American style one near the Olympic area.Inside the hotel, it seemed identical to any nice hotel you’d see in New York, Dallas or LA… except for the big sign next to the faucet in the bathroom.

From John Carey: I had the same experience in Moscow.  Superior 4-star hotel  Water out of the tap was brown.