Archive for the ‘greece’ Category

Somai Pirates: Crew Makes Daring Escape

November 29, 2008

Two British ship security guards and their Irish colleague escaped kidnapping on Friday by jumping into the sea as Somali pirates hijacked a Singaporean tanker in the Gulf of Aden – the latest in a soaring spate of attacks.

By Mike Pflanz in Nairobi
The Telegraph (UK)
The men leapt overboard and were rescued by a German navy helicopter before being flown to the safety of a French frigate nearby.

At least another 25 of the crew, from India and Bangladesh, were still on the Liberian-flagged Biscaglia last night, a chemical tanker which was sailing through the pirate-infested waters between Somalia and Yemen.

The three worked for Anti-Piracy Maritime Security Solutions, a shipping protection firm headquartered in Poole, Dorset.

“APMSS are aware of an incident that occurred this morning on a chemical tanker Biscaglia,” said Nick Davis, a former pilot who set up the company earlier this year.

Somali hostages - British crew jump overboard as pirates hijack another tanker off Somalia

The men, who were rescued by the German navy, board a helicopter from the French Frigate to begin their journey home Photo: AFP/GETTY IMAGES

“We have been informed by coalition military authorities that three of our unarmed security staff were rescued from the water by a coalition helicopter and are currently on board a coalition warship in the Gulf of Aden.

“We have established procedures in place to deal with this and are working hard with the ship owners to assist in this fast developing situation. Our prime concern is the safety of all the people involved.”

Five pirates in a small open speedboat approached the Biscaglia in broad daylight yesterday morning and succeeded in boarding despite the security detachment.

Mr Davis’s firm uses a variety of non-lethal tools to keep pirates away, including audio and magnetic acoustic devices which broadcast messages and even debilitating sonic squeals over long distances.

It is not clear if this equipment was deployed on the Biscaglia.

Noel Choong, head of the piracy reporting centre at the International Maritime Bureau in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, confirmed that the ship sent a distress call at 0447 GMT.

Read the rest:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/piracy/
3533644/British-crew-jump-overboard-as-pirates-
hijack-another-tanker-off-Somalia.html

Somali Pirates Hijack Chemical Tanker, Release Greek Cargo Ship

November 28, 2008

Somali pirates hijacked a chemical tanker with dozens of Indian crew members Friday and a helicopter rescued three security guards who had jumped into the sea, officials said.

Greek authorities, meanwhile, said a Greek-owned cargo ship seized by Somali pirates more than two months ago was released Thursday and that all 25 crew members are unharmed. No details were immediately released.

A warship on patrol near Friday’s attack on the chemical tanker sent helicopters to intervene, but they arrived after pirates had taken control of the Liberian-flagged ship, according to Noel Choong, head of the International Maritime Bureau’s piracy reporting center in Malaysia.

The international naval patrols were set up to fight increasingly brazen pirate attacks in the Gulf of Aden off Somalia’s coast, a major international shipping lane through which about 20 tankers sail daily. Friday’s was the 97th ship hijacking this year.

–AP

The ship master had sent a distress call to the piracy reporting center, which relayed the alert to international forces policing Somali waters, Choong said. No details about how the pirates attacked or the condition of the crew were available immediately.

Read the rest:
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,458585,00.html

The Sirius Star anchored off the coast of Somalia on November ... 
The Sirius Star anchored off the coast of Somalia on November 19. Somali pirates dodged an increased foreign naval presence in the Gulf of Aden to seize another ship as the deadline ticked down for a Saudi tanker held to ransom.

IN THE GULF OF ADEN (AFP) – Somali pirates dodged an increased foreign naval presence in the Gulf of Aden to seize another ship on Friday as the deadline ticked down for a Saudi tanker held to ransom.

They also freed a Greek freighter held since September, leaving 17 ships still in their hands despite their shrinking room for manoeuvre as foreign warships stepped up their efforts to contain a scourge threatening world trade.

Five pirates on fishing boats attacked the Biscaglia, a Liberia-flagged oil and chemical tanker, and boarded the vessel with a ladder, the commander of a nearby French frigate, Nivose, told AFP.

Three crew were fished out by a German navy helicopter after they jumped overboard to escape the pirates, said Jean-Marc Le Quilliec. The three rescued crewmen were later brought on board the Nivose.

The French frigate was escorting a Panamanian-flagged Norwegian bulk carrier and had attracted in its wake at least 17 other ships seeking protection but the Liberian tanker had stayed its course.

On Thursday, pirates also freed the Maltese-flagged Greek ship MV Centauri hijacked two months ago in the Indian Ocean, Andrew Mwangura of the East African Seafarers Association told AFP.

The Centauri, with an all-Filipino crew, was seized on September 18 some 200 miles (320 kilometres) south of Somalia’s lawless capital Mogadishu.

“The ship was freed yesterday along with the crew. It is on its way to Mombasa,” (Kenya’s main port), said Mwangura, adding that it was unclear whether any ransom was paid.

Manila confirmed that all 26 Filipino mariners on the ship were free and a spokesperson for the Navigation Maritime company in Athens said they were all in good health.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081128/wl_africa_afp/
somaliapiracyshipping_081128170718

European Union Sends Naval Force to Deter Pirates

November 10, 2008

The European Union launched Monday a security operation off the coast of Somalia — its first-ever naval mission — to combat growing acts of piracy and help protect aid ships.

Dubbed Operation Atalanta, the mission, endorsed by the bloc’s defence ministers at talks in Brussels, will be led by Britain, with its headquarters in Northwood, near London.

“Britain is a great military power, it’s a nice symbol that this operation be commanded by a British officer and from a British headquarters,” French Defence Minister Herve Morin said, after chairing the meeting.

“It is a great symbol of the evolution in European defence, and I would say, of its coming of age,” he told reporters.

The so-called EUNAVOR operation will be made up of at least seven ships, three of them frigates and one a supply vessel. It will also be backed by surveillance aircraft.

A Kenyan man (R) talks with two officers from the Italian navy ...
There are also NATO ships on anti-piracy patrol.  Here a Kenyan man (R) talks with two officers from the Italian navy on the deck of their destroyer Luigi Durand De La Penne in Mombasa, November 6, 2008. The Italian warship is operating under the Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 (SNMG2) and together with the British military vessel HMS North Umberland conducts maritime operations off the coast of Somalia to allow the World Food Program (WFP) to fulfill its mission of providing humanitarian aid to Somalia. NATO has increased operations following recent attacks on vessels by Somali pirates in the Indian Ocean.REUTERS/Joseph Okanga (KENYA)
.

It will include contributions from eight to 10 countries including France, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands and Spain, with Portugal, Sweden and non-EU nation Norway also likely to take part.

“Our participation in the Somalia project is an important one,” British Foreign Secretary David Miliband told reporters.

“This is obviously a very challenging project but one that European leaders are approaching with real humility as well as determination,” he said.

The EU initiative was taken after Somali President Abdullahi Yusuf Ahmed urged Somalis and the international community to combat rising piracy off the lawless nation’s waters.

Last month, a maritime watchdog said Somali pirates were now responsible for nearly a third of all reported attacks on ships, often using violence and taking hostages.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081110/wl_africa_afp/somaliaunrest
piracyeu;_ylt=Ai2kuEmPNfOgovY2seIT3J.s0NUE

Tibetans Protest & China Awaits Olympic Torch

March 30, 2008

NEW DELHI (AFP) – Several dozen Tibetans in India on Sunday unveiled an “independence torch” in New Delhi that will be carried around the world in an anti-China protest ahead of the Summer Olympics in Beijing.
 
Tibetan activists carry an “Independence Torch” during a rally in New Delhi on March 30, 2008. Several dozen Tibetans in India on Sunday unveiled an “independence torch” in New Delhi that will be carried around the world in an anti-China protest ahead of the Summer Olympics in Beijing.(AFP/Manpreet Romana)

The torch was brought from the northern Indian town of Dharamshala — home to the Dalai Lama, the Tibetan spiritual leader, and the government-in-exile.

The next stop for the protest flame is San Francisco, where the real Olympic torch is expected on April 9.

“This relay is to protest Chinese rule in Tibet. We also don’t want the Olympic torch to go to Tibet because it is not a part of China,” said Urgyen Chophel, president of the Tibetan Youth Congress.

China has come under increasing international pressure over its crackdown against protesters in the Tibetan capital Lhasa and Chinese provinces bordering the Himalayan region.

Tibetan activist groups have put the death toll from weeks of unrest at 135-140 Tibetans. China says rioters killed 18 civilians and two police officers.

Protesters disrupted the Olympic torch-lighting ceremony in Greece last Monday.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080330/wl_sthasia_
afp/chinaunresttibetrights
oly2008chntorch_080330125825

*************

China awaits Olympic torch amid Tibet tensions

By Dan Martin Sun

BEIJING, March 30, 2008 (AFP) – China on Sunday stepped up security on the eve of the arrival of the Olympic torch from Greece, where protesters angry over Beijing‘s crackdown in Tibet tried to disrupt the handover of the flame.

Authorities in Beijing clamped down on Tiananmen Square, where the torch will be officially welcomed to the country on Monday before a worldwide relay expected to be dogged by protests over the deadly unrest in Tibet.

Tensions continued to simmer in the Himalayan region, with activist groups reporting a fresh protest in Lhasa at the weekend, while in neighbouring Nepal, police baton-charged Tibetan protesters Sunday, detaining more than 100 people.

In Athens, Greek officials handed the Olympic flame to the head of the Beijing organising committee, Liu Qi, after police arrested a handful of protesters shouting “Free Tibet”.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080330/wl_
afp/chinaunresttibet
rightsoly2008chn_080330144337

France is healthcare leader, US comes dead last

January 9, 2008

WASHINGTON (AFP) – France is tops, and the United States dead last, in providing timely and effective healthcare to its citizens, according to a survey Tuesday of preventable deaths in 19 industrialized countries.

The study by the Commonwealth Fund and published in the January/February issue of the journal Health Affairs measured developed countries’ effectiveness at providing timely and effective healthcare.

The study, entitled “Measuring the Health of Nations: Updating an Earlier Analysis,” was written by researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. It looked at death rates….

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080108/ts_alt_afp/ushealthfrancemortality;_
ylt=AgrM_z7dz7ZFsNZ0BL0WOI2s0NUE

What’s In A Name (January 1, 2008)

January 1, 2008

By John E. Carey
Updated January 1, 2008

A friend who works near where I work is from India.  His name “Naresh” means King.  He must have very hopeful parents! Koumba is a woman from Africa.  Her name means “First Girl.”

Num Pung means “Honey Bee” in Thailand.  Her mother ate honey comb while pregnant.

Alam is a Bangladeshi name meaning glorious or magnificent. It is usually a boy’s name.

Names fascinate me.  Those from the sphere of the Western European influence frequently choose Bible names or Old English names for their offspring. 

Native American youths earned their names for centuries; or were given meaningful names from tribal lore or from nature’s beauty. 

Many Asians have lyrical, almost poetic names; my wife among them.  She is called Honglien or “Pink Lotus.” By coincidence, my friend from Nepal, Kamala, has the same name: Kamala translates to “Pink Lotus.” 

A comman man’s name in Nepal is “Ram.”  Ram means, “Guard of Hindu.”  WOW!  What a great name!

Other men’s names from Nepal include Mukti (”Freedom”) and Diwakar (”Sun”).

In Vietnam one of my favorite man’s name is “Nghi” (pronounced like “knee”).  It means standing straight and tall, standing at attention or really moral and honest.

Africans often bestow meaningful names upon their children.

One customer of mine is an African named Shaka.  He told me he is named for the greatest warrior of all time: Shaka who united the  Zulu nation in Africa. He said Shaka is viewed and respected for his military adeptness like Attila the Hun or Alexander the Great. 

Islamic people have some wonderful names. Monzer (as with all of our names there are various spellings) means “One Who Warns” or “The Warner.”  It is good to name a little girl baby Rahil, which means “innocent.”

The first thing we have to clarify is this: in our modern world, we tend to lump people and even races into groups like “Native American.” When Columbus arrived in North America there were as many as 500 Tribes; many with languages as different as Chinese is from English. The tribes also had many cultural and religious variations. So as we open this discussion, I penalize myself from the start because I am prone to fall into the trap of lumping people together in huge and unnatural generalities like “all Asians” even though I know that is not correct. I know the Vietnamese are vastly different from the Philipino, for example, even though both are Asians. Even among the Vietnamese there are several “tribes” and cultures.

I have an acquaintence from Thailand named Wantanee.  It means “The Greeter.”   Put your hands together as if in Christian prayer and bow: that’s “The Greeter.”

I have been blessed to know many different people from different parts of the world. Some of my Native American friends, that come from different tribes, have names like “Wild Horse,” “Truth to Tell,” “Comes Killing,” “Soars with Eagles,” and my favorite of all: “Shot-to-Pieces.”

I have been told that many Native American earn their names through some act of bravery or some other memorable event. A young boy that kills a bear might be called “Bear Slayer” for example.

Many who trace their lineage back to Christian European nations might have Bible names. I am named for John the Apostle and we celebrate his Feast Day in the Catholic Calendar on this day. My brothers have old English names: William and Thomas. My sisters also have traditional English names: Pamela and Elizabeth. My cousin is Edward as in Edward the Confessor, I think.

Charles means “manly” or “strong.”  I’ll bet you didn’t know that!

I’ve met many people that think Cynthia is an old English name.  Actually, it comes from Greece.  The meaning of the girl’s name Cynthia is “from Mount Kynthos.” It was one of the names of Artemis, the goddess of the moon, and it refers to her birthplace on Mt. Kynthos.

The name Michael comes from the Hebrew name which means “He Who Is Like God.” Pretty good name. In the Catholic Church, Michael is the number one angel or Archangel. His feast day is September 29, a day he shares with the other top angels: Raphael and Gabriel. Across America many parishes are named for Saint Michael or Raphael or Gabriel.

Michael is a common name in Spanish speaking countries (Miguel), Arabic and even Russian. My name John becomes Juan in Spanish and is also translated into other languages.

Colin means “Victory of the people.”  The name is derived from Greek but became a common name in what is now Britain.  Traditionally the “O” was soft but American’s have taken to say a hard “O” as in Colin Powell.

The Japanese have a lot of terrific names.  Aika means Love Song.  Keiko means Blessed Child.

I am married into a Vietnamese family and each of the Catholic Vietnamese have a Vietnamese name and a Christian name from the Bible. I know a woman named “White Swan” in Vietnamese. Many of the names are terrific!

My wife Lien is also called Mary Magdalene. Mary “M” was a friend of Jesus that may have had a jaded past. I tell people Mary Magdalene “started wrong but finished strong.” Both our parish priests are called John the Baptist. My mother in law is Mary and a Vietnamese friend is Joseph.

But there are some unusual Vietnamese names and this custom spills over into other Asian cultures. The last child of the family might be called “Last One.” I know of a family that has, translated from the native language, a “Last One” and a “Late Mistake.” A particularly tiny Baby might be named “Little Peanut” or something like that.

The Vietnamese name “Hien” means “Gentle.”

I had a Thai friend that swore her father named her “Cucumber” because she was so small and cute.  The Thai name “Wantanee” means “One Who Greets” or “Greeter.”

Another Thai I knew a long time ago was named “Far,” which means sky or more correctly, “clear blue sky.”

Many African and African American names have meaning. A girl named Wangari should know that she has a name from Kenya that means “Leopard.” Mwamba is a Tanzanian name that means “Strong.”

I met a man named Mr. Erhunmwunse on April 2, 2007.  His name means “My Prayers Have Come True” in his native Nigeria!

Ethiopian names are among my favorites: Kalikidan means “promise,” Adonich means “healing,”  Assefa is an Ethiopian name that means “expansive” or “to widen,  “Zelalem” means”Forever” and Lulseged means “King.”

A woman in Ethiopia might be named “Alem.” It means “World.”

The Bangladeshi name “Rowshanara” means “bright” and is my second favorite name from that part of the world after “Amina.”  Amina means “Trusted One.”

Rowshanara is actually the Persian or Farsi word meaning bright — even though the Rowshanara I know is from Bangladesh.

Amin being the root word for “trust.”  Amina is also a common name in Nepal.

Another great Bangladeshi name for a woman is Farida.  Farida means “Unique.”  Another man’s name is “Sariful” which means “Modest.”

Let’s get back to Rowshanara.  My favorite Rowshanara works in a 7-11 near my house.  She is short and thin and “bright” and very beautiful.

This past Sunday I stopped for milk at the 7-11 and found Rowshanara trapped in the refrigerated food case.  Instead of refilling the case from behind, she opened the front door for a front fill.  She is so small that she needed to stand on the bottom shelf.  She is so thin that the glass door closed!

I knocked on the glass door and said, “So this is what a refrigerated Bangladeshi Rowshanara looks like!”

I freed her and she couldn’t stop laughing!

“Jali” is a Bangladeshi name that means “happy thing.” Not a bad name!

Many Indian words have made it to the regular English vocabulary. Most of them were added during the British imperialistic rule over India from spanning from 16th to 20th century. More than five hundred words of Indian origin were absorbed into English during that period and it has grown ever since.

Currently the Oxford English Dictionary lists over 700 words of Indian origin.

Rowshanara’s boss at the 7-11 has an Indian name that translates into “Happiness.”

Names come and go and what is popular today will undoubtedly be passe a few years from now. Sarah Womack wrote in the (London) Telegraph on December 21, 2006, that “Mohammed, and its most common alternative spelling Muhammad, are now more popular babies’ names in England and Wales than George, reflecting the diverse ethnic mix of the population. “

She continues, “Spelled Muhammad, it is the 44th most popular name and enters the top 50 for the first time along with Noah, Oscar, Lucas and Rhys. “

Rhys? I must be getting old.

My purpose here is only to interest the uninitiated in the vast world of names with meaning. Do a word search for your name or the names of your friends and you might be surprised.

Part of the richness of any culture is its language and one facet of the many sided jewel that is language is the vast array of names parents bestow upon their children.
*******

The article above has been updated many, many times.  Although we continue to learn the meaning of new names, we have finally “locked” “What’s in a Name.”

from Thailand:
“Kanalya” means “Subdued, Cool, or Behaving with Style.”

From India:
“Rohini” is a woman’s name meaning “lightening!”
“Igin” means “Sunshine.”
“Dipti” is a woman’s name meaning “source of light.”

From Arabic (He grew up in Kuwait)
“Mahmood” means “gifted.”

From Ethiopia:
Yework Wuha means “Gold Water” or “Liquid Gold.”
Sehay means “Sunshine.”
Tewodros means “Gift of God.”
Genet means “Heaven.”
Almaz means “Diamond.”
Negussie means “King.”

From Nepal:
Jay means “Victory.”
Surya means “Sun.”

Afghanistan:
“Azim” means “The Greatest.”
“Habib” means “Beloved.”
“Wahid” means “Unique.”
“Karim” means “Kind.”

From Korea:
my neighbor’s name is “Oh So Young.”

Bangladesh:
“Nahida” means “Ali’s Power.”

Visit us also at:
http://extendedremarks.blogspot.com/
and
http://peace-and-freedom.blogspot.com/

Please send feedback to me at:
jecarey2603@cox.net

What’s In A Name

July 13, 2007

By John E. Carey
Updated January 1, 2008

A friend who works near where I work is from India.  His name “Naresh” means King.  He must have very hopeful parents! Koumba is a woman from Africa.  Her name means “First Girl.”

Num Pung means “Honey Bee” in Thailand.  Her mother ate honey comb while pregnant.

Alam is a Bangladeshi name meaning glorious or magnificent. It is usually a boy’s name.

Names fascinate me.  Those from the sphere of the Western European influence frequently choose Bible names or Old English names for their offspring. 

Native American youths earned their names for centuries; or were given meaningful names from tribal lore or from nature’s beauty. 

Many Asians have lyrical, almost poetic names; my wife among them.  She is called Honglien or “Pink Lotus.” By coincidence, my friend from Nepal, Kamala, has the same name: Kamala translates to “Pink Lotus.” 

A comman man’s name in Nepal is “Ram.”  Ram means, “Guard of Hindu.”  WOW!  What a great name!

Other men’s names from Nepal include Mukti (”Freedom”) and Diwakar (”Sun”).

In Vietnam one of my favorite man’s name is “Nghi” (pronounced like “knee”).  It means standing straight and tall, standing at attention or really moral and honest.

Africans often bestow meaningful names upon their children.

One customer of mine is an African named Shaka.  He told me he is named for the greatest warrior of all time: Shaka who united the  Zulu nation in Africa. He said Shaka is viewed and respected for his military adeptness like Attila the Hun or Alexander the Great. 

Islamic people have some wonderful names. Monzer (as with all of our names there are various spellings) means “One Who Warns” or “The Warner.”  It is good to name a little girl baby Rahil, which means “innocent.”

The first thing we have to clarify is this: in our modern world, we tend to lump people and even races into groups like “Native American.” When Columbus arrived in North America there were as many as 500 Tribes; many with languages as different as Chinese is from English. The tribes also had many cultural and religious variations. So as we open this discussion, I penalize myself from the start because I am prone to fall into the trap of lumping people together in huge and unnatural generalities like “all Asians” even though I know that is not correct. I know the Vietnamese are vastly different from the Philipino, for example, even though both are Asians. Even among the Vietnamese there are several “tribes” and cultures.

I have an acquaintence from Thailand named Wantanee.  It means “The Greeter.”   Put your hands together as if in Christian prayer and bow: that’s “The Greeter.”

I have been blessed to know many different people from different parts of the world. Some of my Native American friends, that come from different tribes, have names like “Wild Horse,” “Truth to Tell,” “Comes Killing,” “Soars with Eagles,” and my favorite of all: “Shot-to-Pieces.”

I have been told that many Native American earn their names through some act of bravery or some other memorable event. A young boy that kills a bear might be called “Bear Slayer” for example.

Many who trace their lineage back to Christian European nations might have Bible names. I am named for John the Apostle and we celebrate his Feast Day in the Catholic Calendar on this day. My brothers have old English names: William and Thomas. My sisters also have traditional English names: Pamela and Elizabeth. My cousin is Edward as in Edward the Confessor, I think.

Charles means “manly” or “strong.”  I’ll bet you didn’t know that!

I’ve met many people that think Cynthia is an old English name.  Actually, it comes from Greece.  The meaning of the girl’s name Cynthia is “from Mount Kynthos.” It was one of the names of Artemis, the goddess of the moon, and it refers to her birthplace on Mt. Kynthos.

The name Michael comes from the Hebrew name which means “He Who Is Like God.” Pretty good name. In the Catholic Church, Michael is the number one angel or Archangel. His feast day is September 29, a day he shares with the other top angels: Raphael and Gabriel. Across America many parishes are named for Saint Michael or Raphael or Gabriel.

Michael is a common name in Spanish speaking countries (Miguel), Arabic and even Russian. My name John becomes Juan in Spanish and is also translated into other languages.

Colin means “Victory of the people.”  The name is derived from Greek but became a common name in what is now Britain.  Traditionally the “O” was soft but American’s have taken to say a hard “O” as in Colin Powell.

The Japanese have a lot of terrific names.  Aika means Love Song.  Keiko means Blessed Child.

I am married into a Vietnamese family and each of the Catholic Vietnamese have a Vietnamese name and a Christian name from the Bible. I know a woman named “White Swan” in Vietnamese. Many of the names are terrific!

My wife Lien is also called Mary Magdalene. Mary “M” was a friend of Jesus that may have had a jaded past. I tell people Mary Magdalene “started wrong but finished strong.” Both our parish priests are called John the Baptist. My mother in law is Mary and a Vietnamese friend is Joseph.

But there are some unusual Vietnamese names and this custom spills over into other Asian cultures. The last child of the family might be called “Last One.” I know of a family that has, translated from the native language, a “Last One” and a “Late Mistake.” A particularly tiny Baby might be named “Little Peanut” or something like that.

The Vietnamese name “Hien” means “Gentle.”

I had a Thai friend that swore her father named her “Cucumber” because she was so small and cute.  The Thai name “Wantanee” means “One Who Greets” or “Greeter.”

Another Thai I knew a long time ago was named “Far,” which means sky or more correctly, “clear blue sky.”

Many African and African American names have meaning. A girl named Wangari should know that she has a name from Kenya that means “Leopard.” Mwamba is a Tanzanian name that means “Strong.”

I met a man named Mr. Erhunmwunse on April 2, 2007.  His name means “My Prayers Have Come True” in his native Nigeria!

Ethiopian names are among my favorites: Kalikidan means “promise,” Adonich means “healing,”  Assefa is an Ethiopian name that means “expansive” or “to widen,  “Zelalem” means”Forever” and Lulseged means “King.”

A woman in Ethiopia might be named “Alem.” It means “World.”

The Bangladeshi name “Rowshanara” means “bright” and is my second favorite name from that part of the world after “Amina.”  Amina means “Trusted One.”

Rowshanara is actually the Persian or Farsi word meaning bright — even though the Rowshanara I know is from Bangladesh.

Amin being the root word for “trust.”  Amina is also a common name in Nepal.

Another great Bangladeshi name for a woman is Farida.  Farida means “Unique.”  Another man’s name is “Sariful” which means “Modest.”

Let’s get back to Rowshanara.  My favorite Rowshanara works in a 7-11 near my house.  She is short and thin and “bright” and very beautiful.

This past Sunday I stopped for milk at the 7-11 and found Rowshanara trapped in the refrigerated food case.  Instead of refilling the case from behind, she opened the front door for a front fill.  She is so small that she needed to stand on the bottom shelf.  She is so thin that the glass door closed!

I knocked on the glass door and said, “So this is what a refrigerated Bangladeshi Rowshanara looks like!”

I freed her and she couldn’t stop laughing!

“Jali” is a Bangladeshi name that means “happy thing.” Not a bad name!

Many Indian words have made it to the regular English vocabulary. Most of them were added during the British imperialistic rule over India from spanning from 16th to 20th century. More than five hundred words of Indian origin were absorbed into English during that period and it has grown ever since.

Currently the Oxford English Dictionary lists over 700 words of Indian origin.

Rowshanara’s boss at the 7-11 has an Indian name that translates into “Happiness.”

Names come and go and what is popular today will undoubtedly be passe a few years from now. Sarah Womack wrote in the (London) Telegraph on December 21, 2006, that “Mohammed, and its most common alternative spelling Muhammad, are now more popular babies’ names in England and Wales than George, reflecting the diverse ethnic mix of the population. “

She continues, “Spelled Muhammad, it is the 44th most popular name and enters the top 50 for the first time along with Noah, Oscar, Lucas and Rhys. “

Rhys? I must be getting old.

My purpose here is only to interest the uninitiated in the vast world of names with meaning. Do a word search for your name or the names of your friends and you might be surprised.

Part of the richness of any culture is its language and one facet of the many sided jewel that is language is the vast array of names parents bestow upon their children.
*******

The article above has been updated many, many times.  Although we continue to learn the meaning of new names, we have finally “locked” “What’s in a Name.”

From India:
“Igin” means “Sunshine.”
“Dipti” is a woman’s name meaning “source of light.”

From Arabic (He grew up in Kuwait)
“Mahmood” means “gifted.”

From Ethiopia:
Yework Wuha means “Gold Water” or “Liquid Gold.”
Sehay means “Sunshine.”
Tewodros means “Gift of God.”
Genet means “Heaven.”
Almaz means “Diamond.”
Negussie means “King.”

From Nepal:
Jay means “Victory.”
Surya means “Sun.”

Afghanistan:
“Azim” means “The Greatest.”
“Habib” means “Beloved.”
“Wahid” means “Unique.”

From Korea:
my neighbor’s name is “Oh So Young.”

Visit us also at:
http://extendedremarks.blogspot.com/
and
http://peace-and-freedom.blogspot.com/

Please send feedback to me at:
jecarey2603@cox.net