Archive for the ‘genocide’ Category

Cambodia quietly marks Pol Pot’s death amid fears for KR trial

April 16, 2008

PHNOM PENH (AFP) – Cambodia on Tuesday quietly marked the 10-year anniversary of Khmer Rouge leader Pol Pot‘s death, amid fears that time is running out to try his ageing surviving cadre before a genocide tribunal.
.
Pol Pot, the tyrant who turned Cambodia into the killing fields in the late 1970s, died on April 15, 1998, reportedly from heart attack, in the remote northern Cambodian outpost of Anlong Veng, the Khmer Rouge‘s final stronghold.

He was unceremoniously cremated under a pile of rubbish and tires.

“Pol Pot died a criminal, responsible for millions of lives,” said Youk Chhang, director of the Documentation Center of Cambodia, which collects evidence of Khmer Rouge atrocities. “He is not the kind of person Cambodian people should commemorate.”

The Choeung Ek killing fields memorial in Phnom Penh. Cambodia ...
The Choeung Ek killing fields memorial in Phnom Penh. Cambodia on Tuesday quietly marked the 10-year anniversary of Khmer Rouge leader Pol Pot’s death, amid fears that time is running out to try his ageing surviving cadre before a genocide tribunal(AFP/Tang Chhin Sothy)

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080415/wl_asia_afp/cambodia
genocidetribunalunco
urtanniversary_080415073700

A Brilliant Fraud: Obama and The Reverend, No Deal

March 23, 2008

 By Charles Krauthammer

 Charles Krauthammer

The Washington Post

Friday, March 21, 2008; Page A17

The beauty of a speech is that you don’t just give the answers, you provide your own questions. “Did I ever hear him make remarks that could be considered controversial while I sat in church? Yes.” So said Barack Obama, in his Philadelphia speech about his pastor, friend, mentor and spiritual adviser of 20 years, Jeremiah Wright.

An interesting, if belated, admission. But the more important question is: which“controversial” remarks?

Wright’s assertion from the pulpit that the U.S. government invented HIV “as a means of genocide against people of color”? Wright’s claim that America was morally responsible for Sept. 11 — “chickens coming home to roost” — because of, among other crimes, Hiroshima and Nagasaki? (Obama says he missed church that day. Had he never heard about it?) .
.
What about the charge that the U.S. government (of Franklin Roosevelt, mind you) knew about Pearl Harbor, but lied about it? Or that the government gives drugs to black people, presumably to enslave and imprison them?

Obama condemns such statements as wrong and divisive, then frames the next question: “There will no doubt be those for whom my statements of condemnation are not enough. Why associate myself with Reverend Wright in the first place, they may ask? Why not join another church?”

But that is not the question. The question is why didn’t he leave that church? Why didn’t he leave — why doesn’t he leave even today — a pastor who thundered not once but three times from the pulpit (on a DVD the church proudly sells) “God damn America”? Obama’s 5,000-word speech, fawned over as a great meditation on race, is little more than an elegantly crafted, brilliantly sophistic justification of that scandalous dereliction.

His defense rests on two central propositions: (a) moral equivalence and (b) white guilt.

(a) Moral equivalence. Sure, says Obama, there’s Wright, but at the other “end of the spectrum” there’s Geraldine Ferraro, opponents of affirmative action and his own white grandmother, “who once confessed her fear of black men who passed by her on the street, and who on more than one occasion has uttered racial or ethnic stereotypes that made me cringe.” But did she shout them in a crowded theater to incite, enrage and poison others?

“I can no more disown [Wright] than I can my white grandmother.” What exactly was Grandma’s offense? Jesse Jackson himself once admitted to the fear he feels from the footsteps of black men on the street. And Harry Truman was known to use epithets for blacks and Jews in private, yet is revered for desegregating the armed forces and recognizing the first Jewish state since Jesus’s time. He never spread racial hatred. Nor did Grandma.

Yet Obama compares her to Wright. Does he not see the moral difference between the occasional private expression of the prejudices of one’s time and the use of a public stage to spread racial lies and race hatred?

(b) White guilt. Obama’s purpose in the speech was to put Wright’s outrages in context. By context, Obama means history. And by history, he means the history of white racism. Obama says, “We do not need to recite here the history of racial injustice in this country,” and then he proceeds to do precisely that. What lies at the end of his recital of the long train of white racial assaults from slavery to employment discrimination? Jeremiah Wright, of course.

This contextual analysis of Wright’s venom, this extenuation of black hate speech as a product of white racism, is not new. It’s the Jesse Jackson politics of racial grievance, expressed in Ivy League diction and Harvard Law nuance. That’s why the speech made so many liberal commentators swoon: It bathed them in racial guilt while flattering their intellectual pretensions. An unbeatable combination.

But Obama was supposed to be new. He flatters himself as a man of the future transcending the anger of the past as represented by his beloved pastor. Obama then waxes rhapsodic about the hope brought by the new consciousness of the young people in his campaign. Then answer this, Senator: If Wright is a man of the past, why would you expose your children to his vitriolic divisiveness?
.
This is a man who curses America and who proclaimed moral satisfaction in the deaths of 3,000 innocents at a time when their bodies were still being sought at Ground Zero. It is not just the older congregants who stand and cheer and roar in wild approval of Wright’s rants, but young people as well. Why did you give $22,500 just two years ago to a church run by a man of the past who infects the younger generation with precisely the racial attitudes and animus you say you have come unto us to transcend?

China Condemns Pro-Tibet Protests World-Wide

March 17, 2008
By AUDRA ANG, Associated Press Writers

BEIJING – China accused Tibetan supporters of the Dalai Lama of attacking its embassies around the world, vowing Monday to protect its territory as it clamped down on anti-government protests in Tibet.

Tibetan monks shout slogans during a protest in New Delhi March ...
Tibetan monks shout slogans during a protest in New Delhi March 17, 2008. China said on Monday it had shown great restraint in the face of violent protests by Tibetans, which it said were orchestrated by followers of the Dalai Lama seeking to wreck the Beijing Olympics in August.REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA)

The Foreign Ministry comments were the first comments by the central government since Tibetan protests against Chinese rule began on March 10. They came just hours before a midnight deadline set by Chinese authorities for protesters in the Tibetan capital Lhasa to surrender or face harsh consequences.

“The Chinese government will unwaveringly protect national sovereignty and territorial integrity,” spokesman Liu Jianchao said at a news conference.

The protests that began in Tibet have spilled over to neighboring provinces and even to the capital Beijing where students staged a sit-down demonstration on Monday. There have been sympathy protests around the world as well, many of them outside of Chinese diplomatic missions.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080317/ap_on_re_as/china_tibet;_ylt=AgWy1Ees
MFNE50Sb_1Qlc6as0NUE

China denies using deadly force in Tibet amid mounting pressure

March 17, 2008

By Karl Malakunas

BEIJING (AFP) – China faced mounting global pressure over Tibet on Monday amid exiles’ claims that hundreds of people may have died in a crackdown on protesters, even though Beijing denied using deadly force.

Chinese riot police march through the city of Kangding, located ...
Chinese riot police march through the city of Kangding, located around 400 kilometres (250 miles) west of Chengdu in Sichuan Province March 17, 2008. Chinese officials declared a “people’s war” of security and propaganda against support for the Dalai Lama in Tibet after the worst unrest in the region for two decades racked the regional capital Lhasa over the past few days, killing at least 10 people. The convulsion of Tibetan anger at the Chinese presence in the region came after days of peaceful protests by monks and was a sharp blow to Beijing’s preparations for the Olympic Games in August, when China wants to showcase prosperity and unity.REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA) 
 

In its first official account of the unrest in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa, China blamed protesters who rose up against Chinese rule in what has turned into a public relations nightmare for Beijing ahead of the Olympic Games.

“They either burned or hacked to death 13 innocent civilians,” Tibet government chairman Qiangba Puncog told reporters in Beijing, adding Chinese forces had not fired weapons at protesters.

“Throughout the process, (security forces) did not carry or use any lethal weapons.”

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080317/ts_afp/chinaunresttibetrights_080317124041

Police arrest a Tibetan exile protesting outside the Chinese ...
Police arrest a Tibetan exile protesting outside the Chinese embassy in New Delhi March 17, 2008. China said on Monday it had shown great restraint in the face of violent protests by Tibetans, which it said were orchestrated by followers of the Dalai Lama seeking to wreck the Beijing Olympics in August.REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA)

CIA Director: China “Strangling” Smaller Entities

March 13, 2008

By Bill Gertz
The Washington Times
March 13, 2008

China is “strangling” emerging island democracies in the Pacific in pursuit of narrow goals such as friendly votes at the United Nations, CIA Director Michael V. Hayden said in an interview in which he criticized Beijing’s failure to act as a responsible global power.

CIA Director Hayden

Mr. Hayden also criticized China’s pursuit of Sudanese oil supplies, even at the cost of backing a government that the United States accuses of participating in genocidal activities in the Darfur region of Sudan.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/article/20080313/
NATION/330455152/1001

China urges Sudan to seek compromise in Darfur

March 7, 2008
By Chris Buckley

BEIJING (Reuters) – China has urged Sudan to do more to stop fighting in Darfur and speed the arrival of more peacekeepers, Beijing‘s envoy on the crisis said, defending his country as a diplomatic bridge to help end the bloodshed.

China has faced widespread Western criticism that it has not used its oil, arms and business stakes in Sudan to press for an end to deadly havoc in the vast, arid Darfur region.

An African Union-U.N. soldier stands in front of an old African ...
An African Union-U.N. soldier stands in front of an old African Union APC during a patrol in West Darfur in El-Geneina February 19, 2008. China has urged Sudan to do more to stop fighting in Darfur and speed the arrival of more peacekeepers, Beijing’s envoy on the crisis said, defending his country as a diplomatic bridge to help end the bloodshed.
(Opheera McDoom/Reuters)
.


Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080307/ts_nm/
china_sudan_darfur_dc_2

China admits effect of pressure over Darfur

March 7, 2008

BEIJING (AFP) – Global pressure on China over its ties to Sudan has spurred the Chinese government to take a more proactive stance on ending violence in Darfur, the nation’s special envoy on the issue said Friday.
Steven Spielberg 
Hollywood director Steven Spielberg decided to quit the Beijing Olympics over the Darfur issue.
AP / Color China Photo
.
“Darfur is the focus of international attention and many Western nations want China to play a bigger role,” Chinese diplomat Liu Guijin told journalists.

“This is why I have been appointed as the special envoy of the Chinese government on the Darfur issue.”

Liu, fresh from a visit to the troubled region, was appointed China’s envoy on Darfur in May last year, when an international campaign to pressure Beijing on Sudan ahead of the Beijing Olympics began to take on steam.

Although China has long opposed linking the Olympics to Darfur….Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080307/wl_africa_
afp/sudanunrestdarfurchinaoly2008_080307053505

 

With Beijing’s support, genocide in Darfur continues

February 4, 2008

By Nat Hentoff
The Washington Times
February 4, 2008

For strutting arrogance, few world leaders equal Sudan’s president, Lt. Gen. Omar Bashir. Realistic hope is diminishing — in those countries that care — about ending the genocide in Darfur. Not surprisingly Gen. Bashir, on Jan. 7, reports the Sudan Tribune Web site, “was dancing (and) celebrating the completion, near Khartoum, of the Bridge of the Chinese-Sudanese Friendship.”
.
“With China’s help,” gloated Gen. Bashir (who has effectively obstructed the current mission of the combined force sent by the U.N. Security Council and the African Union), “Sudan will certainly score glorious achievements one after another on our path of construction and development.”
.
And China’s glory in hosting this year’s Olympics, so important for the improved reputation of that Chinese dictatorship, may not be tarred enough because of its quintessential economic support of Mr. al-Bashir to stop that support.
.
To further show his dancing contempt of the United Nations and President Bush, the first world leader to call the mass murders and rapes in Darfur “genocide,” Gen. Bashir on Jan. 16 appointed as a special advisor Musa Hilal — the chief leader and planner of Gen. Bashir’s monstrous militia, the
Janjaweed.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/article/20080
204/EDITORIAL07/905997276/1013/EDITORIAL

Chinese Envoy Denounces Efforts to Link Darfur Concerns, Beijing Olympics

January 11, 2008

By Edward Cody
Washington Post Foreign Service
Friday, January 11, 2008; Page A10

BEIJING, Jan. 10 — China on Thursday rejected any attempts to connect humanitarian concerns about Darfur to the upcoming Beijing Olympics, saying they come from people unwilling to view objectively China’s role in that embattled region of Sudan.

China’s defense, given by Liu Guijin, special envoy for Darfur, came as Western governments and U.N. officials intensified criticism of the Sudanese government for throwing up obstacles to the deployment of a joint U.N.-African Union peacekeeping force that is supposed to field 26,000 troops but so far has only 9,000 on the ground.

Liu’s comments reflected a newfound determination by the Chinese Foreign Ministry to respond to critics of its policy in Sudan. In particular, the Chinese government has urgently sought to fend off suggestions that this summer’s Beijing Olympics should be boycotted. Chinese widely regard the Games as an international celebration of their country’s swift progress over the last quarter-century; any boycott would be a political blow to the ruling Communist Party.

Read the rest:
 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/01/10/AR2008011001066.html

Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge court opens first public hearing

November 20, 2007

By Suy Se

PHNOM PENH (AFP) – Cambodia‘s Khmer Rouge court opened its first public hearing Tuesday, in what many see as a landmark moment for a country trying to come to terms with the brutal 1970s regime.

Judges heard day-long arguments by lawyers for jailed regime prison chief Duch, who is appealing against his detention by the UN-backed tribunal pending a trial expected to take place next year.

Duch, whose real name is Kaing Guek Eav, allegedly oversaw the torture and extermination of 16,000 men, women and children at the Khmer Rouge’s ….

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20071120/wl_asia_afp/
cambodiagenocidetribunaluncourt_071120121945