Archive for the ‘football’ Category

Plaxico Burress in Handcuffs; Bail $100,000; Hospital, Teammate Being Investigated

December 1, 2008

Plaxico Burress was led out of a police precinct in handcuffs Monday after surrendering on a weapons possession charge, and authorities said that teammate Antonio Pierce is being investigated over his role in an accidental shooting at a Manhattan nightclub.

Burress was silent but held his head high as he was led out of the police station, where a crowd that included Giants fans hovered nearby with cell phone cameras. Burress planned to plead not guilty to the charge during a Monday court appearance, said defense lawyer Benjamin Brafman.

By COLLEEN LONG, Associated Press Writer

New York Giants' Plaxico Burress, right, arrives at Manhattan ... 
New York Giants’ Plaxico Burress, right, arrives at Manhattan Supreme Court for arraignment with an unidentified man on Monday, Dec. 1, 2008 in New York. Burress apparently accidentally shot himself at a Manhattan nightclub Friday evening and was treated at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center. He was released Saturday.(AP Photo/David Karp)

The star wide receiver who helped the New York Giants win the Super Bowl accidentally shot himself at a nightclub Friday evening and was treated at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center. He was released Saturday.

The episode set off a frenzy that showed no signs of letting up Monday: Police said the case could expand beyond Burress, with authorities investigating Pierce and the hospital for failing to report the shooting. The NFL is closely monitoring the developments as well.

Related:
Plaxico, You Dope, Career, Life Could Be Shot

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081201/ap_on_sp_fo_ne/fbn_
giants_burress_shot;_ylt=AvCruUnbnjY6opBd.Ug3qmSs0NUE

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Plaxico Burress has appeared in court on weapons possession charges stemming from an accidental shooting at a Manhattan nightclub.

Manhattan Criminal Court Judge Felicia Mennin set bail at $100,000 and ordered Burress to return March 31.

More from the Associated Press:
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,459848,00.html

Plaxico, You Dope; Career, Life Could Be Shot

December 1, 2008

We worship great performances like cathing the winning pass in the Super bowl.  But sometimes these ‘heroes’ are all wrong for us….

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Trouble-prone Giants receiver Plaxico Burress desperately tried to sidestep the law after shooting himself in the leg with an illegal handgun he carried into a Midtown nightclub – getting workers at the hot spot and at a top city hospital to lie for him, sources told The Post yesterday.

By MURRAY WEISS, LARRY CELONA and ERIC LENKOWITZ
The New York Post

In a Jan. 29, 2008 file photo New York Giants wide receiver ... 
In a Jan. 29, 2008 file photo New York Giants wide receiver Plaxico Burress is seen during media day for the Super Bowl XLII football game in Glendale, Ariz. Buress is expected to turn himself in to police in New York Monday Dec. 1, 2008 to face weapons charges.(AP Photo/Stephan Savoia/file)

Details of the hectic hours Burress spent trying to conceal his bone-headed blunder emerged as he said he would surrender to the NYPD today. Detectives last night seized the .40-caliber gun from his New Jersey home.

His web of deceit included:

* Taking his gun from the Midtown club Latin Quarter, where workers never called authorities and even cleaned up afterward.

* Spending about 90 minutes making frantic calls to figure out where his wound could be discreetly treated.

* Getting special treatment at New York-Cornell Hospital, where he gave his name as Harris Smith, saying he’d been shot at an Applebee’s restaurant. Nonetheless, hospital workers recognized him as Plaxico Burress, sources said, and the gunshot was not reported, as required by law.

Police found the gun last night at the Super Bowl hero’s Totowa home, sources said, after they were told it was in his kitchen. He was not home at the time.

He plans to turn himself in at the 17th Precinct station house, said his lawyer, Benjamin Brafman.

Burress, 31, will be slapped with a felony gun charge and plead not guilty, his lawyer said.

Read the rest:
http://www.nypost.com/seven/12012008/news/regionalnews/
plax_bid_to_keep_his_shot_in_dark_141709.htm


A hero you can rely upon….

Related:
Plaxico Burress in Handcuffs Monday; Hospital, Teammate Being Investigated

Cowboys’ Pacman Jones enters alcohol treatment

October 20, 2008

Suspended Dallas Cowboys cornerback Adam “Pacman” Jones has entered an alcohol treatment center.

Cowboys owner Jerry Jones says the player checked into a facility “in another part of the country.” The treatment plan is overseen by the NFL.

Dallas Cowboys' Adam 'Pacman' Jones prepares to participate ... 
Dallas Cowboys’ Adam ‘Pacman’ Jones prepares to participate in practice at the Cowboys training facility in Irving, Texas, Thursday Oct. 9, 2008. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell has suspended Adam ‘Pacman’ Jones indefinitely for violating the league’s personal conduct policy.(AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

Adam Jones was suspended for at least four games by the league last Tuesday. He had been involved in an alcohol-related scuffle with one of his bodyguards at a private party in Dallas. That came only six weeks after he was reinstated from a 17-month suspension because of repeated legal troubles.

Jerry Jones spoke Monday after a news conference about a company the Cowboys are starting with the New York Yankees to handle concessions and merchandise sales at their new stadiums.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081020/ap_on_sp_fo_ne/fbn_cowboys_
pacman;_ylt=Akt_g97xRQvwR9L4QnyiNJas0NUE

Why Americans love the Irish (St. Patrick’s Day is Today!)

March 13, 2008

St. Patrick’s Day is about more than just green beer. It’s about scrappy underdogs who embrace their heritage while bleeding red, white and blue.

By Michael Medved
USA Today
March 13, 2008

On Monday, tens of millions of Americans of  every race and background will join together to celebrate a uniquely cherished ethnic holiday — a tribute to despised, destitute Hibernian hordes whose descendants eventually claimed pride of place as the most popular of all immigrant groups. With mass immigration once again a contentious issue in our politics and culture, the St. Patrick’s Day formula — combining Irish pride with unabashed, flag-waving Americanism — offers hope that current controversies might someday achieve similarly satisfactory resolution.


Saint Patrick

There’s little doubt that our annual “Great Day for the Irish” draws more attention than festive commemorations of other national origins (Columbus Day, Pulaski Day, Cinco de Mayo, Israeli Independence Day, you name it), complete with shamrock decorations turning up nearly everywhere, big city rivers sparkling with emerald dye, and school kids featuring green in their wardrobes under serious risk of pinching. The mostly positive images and emotions toward the Irish say as much about the character of the USA as they do about the sons and the daughters of the Auld Sod.
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Initial hostilityIn part, we love the Irish because we instinctively embrace underdogs. The Emerald Isle suffered hellish torments during 800 years of oppression by the English — the same arrogant colonialists we defied in our own Revolution. When the starving Irish began to arrive en masse during “The Great Hunger” of the 1840s, they initially faced fiery hostility from nativist Americans and encountered occasional posted notices declaring, “No Irish Need Apply.” Agitation culminated with bloody riots against churches and convents, with the virulently anti-immigrant “Know Nothing” Party electing numerous governors and mayors and even running a former president (Millard Fillmore) as a credible contender for the White House. Despite such obstacles, Irish arrivals persevered, establishing a vibrant Catholic community, dominating police and fire departments within a generation, and playing the lead role in organizing labor unions and big-city political machines.When Harvard-educated millionaire John Fitzgerald Kennedy won the presidency in 1960, barely 110 years had passed since the American arrival of his famine-fleeing great-grandfather, Patrick Kennedy. That’s the sort of poverty-to-power, rags-to-riches tale that has always inspired Americans in this nation of fresh starts and second chances.

The other key element in the appeal of the Irish involves their instantaneous affirmation of American patriotism. Many other immigrant groups experienced a sense of divided loyalties, torn by nostalgic connections to old country nationalisms. In Ireland, however, English overlords ruthlessly suppressed expressions of national pride or distinctive culture (including Gaelic language) so that immigrants embraced Yankee symbols and customs with scant hesitation. That redoubtable patriotic ditty It’s a Grand Old Flag came from Broadway composer George M. Cohan, simultaneously proud of his Irish heritage and his status as the original Yankee Doodle Dandy.

German-Americans count as even more numerous than Irish-Americans (with 49 million claiming German ancestry, compared with 35 million saying they’re Irish). But Ireland never became a rival world power or fought the United States in two brutal wars — preventing any contradiction between loyalty to origins and unquestioned love of the new homeland. John Ford, the legendary filmmaker whose classic westerns forever defined our cowboy heritage, proudly claimed that he began life as Sean Aloysius O’Feeny, the son of immigrants from County Galway. In addition to all the soul-stirring John Wayne horse-operas, Ford also made magnificent films (The Quiet Man, The Last Hurrah) celebrating Ireland and Irish-Americans.

That same blend of heartfelt Americana and Emerald Isle nostalgia characterizes the annual revelry on St. Paddy’s Day. Unlike other ethnic holidays, the festivities seem more familiar than exotic, more mainstream than multicultural. Irish names, accents and melodies have become inescapably American — not some demonstration of diversity or distinctive difference. Irish-ness feels comfortable, even cozy, in part because the sons of the Shamrock have been here so long (the first St. Patrick’s Day Parade took place in New York in 1762) and most of them had arrived speaking English.

For other immigrants

It’s impossible to imagine a sentimental hit song called When German Eyes Are Smiling, despite the countless contributions of German-Americans to our culture.

Sports teams choose their names to convey a sense of classic American pluck, so it’s unthinkable that the legendary Notre Dame football ….

The “Golden Dome” at the University of Notre Dame; home of the “Fighting Irish.”

Read the rest:
http://blogs.usatoday.com/oped/2008/03/why-americans-l.html

NFL: Pain Game

February 3, 2008

By Michael Leahy
The Washington Post
(Sunday Magazine)
February 3, 2008

Long after winning his Super Bowl ring, Dave Pear says his life is now a ‘torture chamber’ of pain. Can he and other injured retirees force the NFL to rethinkits financial responsibilities to the generations that helped build the league?

He is shuffling around his house in a heavy winter coat, the collar pulled snug to ward off the terrible chill he feels. Three decades ago, he played professional football for six seasons, made it to an all-star game, won a Super Bowl ring. Nowadays, his ravaged body is betraying him. “I’m so cold,” he mutters, and shivers. “You cold?”
National Football League
No, I say.

“I’m freezing,” he says.

It’s football season, the time of year hardest on Pear’s body and spirit. All the football talk on TV — and in the Seattle suburb where he lives — just serves as a bitter reminder to Pear of what has happened to his life and what he thinks the National Football League owes him.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/01/29/AR2008012904015.html

Winning is the only thing: Ambitious to a Fault

October 18, 2007

By Robert J. Samuelson
The Washington Post
Thursday, October 18, 2007; Page A25

A great strength of American society is the drive to succeed — well, not just to succeed but to do better than anyone else; to be a star, a tycoon, an authority, a power, a celebrity or a leader; to be admired, respected, feared or obeyed more than your peers. It is the belief in these possibilities that motivates countless Americans to strive for excellence, to work hard, and to search for new discoveries and inventions. As for one of the great weaknesses of American society, see all of the above.

It is an enduring paradox of the American condition. There is a point at which ambition and the determination to succeed, which generally serve us well, turn destructive, corrupting and dishonest. Success becomes its own god. Winning is what matters; the methods or consequences count little or not at all.

The latest reminder of the paradox comes from three recent cases: Bill Belichick, the coach of the New England Patriots; runner Marion Jones; and trial lawyer William Lerach. Belichick had opponents’ defensive signals videotaped, contrary to explicit National Football League rules; Jones admitted taking illegal drugs around the time of the 2000 Olympics; and Lerach pleaded guilty to illegally hiring plaintiffs as fronts for filing suits against companies. Belichick got off fairly easy (a $500,000 fine), but the others did not. Jones has returned five medals (three gold, two bronze) won at the Sydney Olympics, and Lerach faces $8 million of penalties and at least a year in jail.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/10/17/
AR2007101702117.html?hpid=opinionsbox1

Iran and U.S. Headed Toward War?

September 24, 2007

y KAREN MATTHEWS, Associated Press Writer NEW YORK – Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad arrived in New York to protests Sunday and said in a television interview that Iran was neither building a nuclear bomb nor headed to war with the United States.

The president’s motorcade pulled up to the midtown hotel where he will be staying while he appears at a series of events including the U.N. General Assembly and a forum at Columbia University, where about 40 elected officials and civic leaders decried his visit.

Read the rest at:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070924/ap_on_re_us/iran_us;_ylt=
AvwBJQZFn95KmdQRaYRNEg2s0NUE

Related:
https://johnibii.wordpress.com/2007/09/24/ahmadinejad-in-america-an-editorial/

Columbia Welcomes Ahmadinejad; Vatican “No” to U.S. SecState; Mattel Apologizes to China and San Diego Chargers Owe Everyone an Apology

NFL’s tale of two Michaels

September 6, 2007

NFL: Beat your dog, sit out the season.  Beat your wife and you still play.

Editorial
USA Today
September 6, 2007

Even people who aren’t football fans have heard about Michael Vick, the star quarterback whose abuse of pit bulls led to a guilty plea on federal dogfighting charges, drew public vilification and spurred an indefinite suspension from the NFL.

Far fewer people have heard of Michael Pittman, another NFL player accused of violence.

In May 2003, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers running back was arrested on charges of ramming his Hummer into a car driven by his wife and carrying their 2-year-old child and a babysitter. It was the fourth time the 6-foot, 228-pound player was accused of domestic violence. Even so, Pittman played the 2003 season.