Archive for the ‘feed’ Category

China official says tainted eggs “isolated” case

November 3, 2008

Before you read what China’s communist government says about poison in China’s products, consider this: the poison melamine has been found in Chinese made (and exported) products including toothpaste, cough syrup, eggs, milk, meat, chicken, biscuits, candy and a host of other products for about two years.  We believe, therefore, the claims by the esteemed member of the communist government seem completely without merit….as usual….But you decide for yourself.  If you “swallow” what communist China says, whatever you do, don’t swallow anything else made from within China….
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China’s agriculture minister has called the discovery of melamine-tainted eggs “isolated cases,” but urged continued scrutiny over the animal feed industry to ensure food safety.

In remarks posted on the ministry Web site late Sunday, Minister Sun Zhengcai said that “very few batches of eggs from very few companies” contained the chemical melamine.

Calling them “isolated cases,” he nevertheless said the Agriculture Ministry’s departments “should pay high attention” to the feed quality to ensure the safety of eggs and other animal products, and protect farmers’ interests.

A vendor waits for customers at her stall as she sells eggs ... 
A vendor waits for customers at her stall as she sells eggs at a market in Xiangfan, Hubei province November 3, 2007. Chinese eggs tainted with an industrial chemical were an isolated case, the Agriculture Minister was quoted saying the day after officials were ordered to crack the “dark” networks selling contaminated animal feed.REUTERS/Stringer (CHINA) CHINA OUT

Sun made the remarks during a trip to a farm in Dingxing county in northern Hebei Sunday.

Last week, four brands of Chinese eggs were found to be contaminated with melamine, and agriculture officials speculated that the cause was adulterated feed given to hens. No illnesses have been linked to melamine in eggs.

Other ministry officials have asserted that the practice of deliberately adding melamine to animal feed was widely practiced, signaling that melamine contamination may be more widespread than in just baby formula and dairy products.

Inspectors have destroyed 3,682 tons of animal feed that was tainted with the chemical. Commonly used in plastics and fertilizers, melamine is high in nitrogen, which registers as high protein levels in routine tests of food and feed.

Infant formula tainted with the chemical has been blamed for sickening tens of thousands of children and causing the deaths of four infants.

Though experts say at low levels it does not pose a risk to human health, higher concentrations of melamine harm the kidneys.

A child suffering from kidney stones receives medical treatment ...
A child suffering from kidney stones receives medical treatment at a hospital in Hefei, Anhui province in this September 19, 2008 file photo. The discovery of melamine in eggs as well as in baby formula, milk products, biscuits, chocolates and other foodstuffs containing milk derivatives confirms what experts have long suspected; that the chemical is deeply embedded in the human food chain. China is a major transgressor as carcinogenic chemicals are regularly used as food colouring agents or as preservatives, experts say. To match feature CHINA-MELAMINE/FOODCHAIN REUTERS/Stringer/Files (CHINA).

Over the weekend, Agriculture Ministry official Wang Zhicai said that inspection teams have descended on feed makers nationwide in a “punishment” campaign to ferret out those found using excessive amounts of the chemical melamine.

Among the 250,000 feed-makers and animal breeding farms inspected, inspectors found more than 500 engaged in illegal or questionable practices, with police further investigating 27 companies, Wang said. He likened the behavior of some of the companies to organized crime, calling them “black nests of gangsters.”

China has struggled to appear responsive to a widening food scandal. In the nearly two months since the government first acknowledged that melamine contaminated the milk supply, the chemical has been detected in eggs, candy and other products. Its presence in feed raises fears about the safety of meat and fish.

A little more than a year ago, China vowed to minimize the use of melamine after it was found in pet food exports that killed dogs and cats in North America in 2007.
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China Widens Food Tests on Signs of New Contamination, Poison

October 31, 2008

Chinese regulators said Friday that they were widening their investigation into contaminated food amid growing signs that an industrial chemical called melamine had leached into the nation’s animal feed supplies, posing even deeper health risks to consumers after the recent tainted milk scandal.

By David Barboza
The New York Times
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The announcement came after food safety tests earlier this week found that eggs produced in three different provinces in China were contaminated with melamine, a chemical that is blamed for causing kidney stones and renal failure in infants. The tests have led to recalls of eggs and consumer warnings.

The reports are another serious blow to China’s agriculture industry, which is already struggling to cope with its worst food safety scandal in decades after melamine tainted milk supplies sickened over 50,000 children, caused at least four deaths and led to global recalls of goods produced with Chinese dairy products earlier this fall.

 
Above: A worker placed a notice that read “No melamine contained” on egg crates at a major eggs production factory in suburban Beijing on Friday. Photo by Andy Wong, Associated Press.

The cases are fueling global concerns about contaminated Chinese food. In Hong Kong, food safety officials announced this week that they would be testing a wider variety of foods for melamine, including vegetables, flour and meat products.

But food safety experts have also asked consumers to remain calm because while melamine-tainted milk has hospitalized thousands in China, there are no known cases thus far of consumers becoming seriously ill from eating melamine-tainted eggs.

Hong Kong officials said melamine was found in higher than permissible levels in eggs imported from China, but that a child would have to eat about two dozen eggs in a single day to become ill.

Still, if eggs, milk and animal feed supplies are tainted, there is the specter of an even wider array of foods that could come under scrutiny for contamination, everything from pork and chicken supplies to bread, biscuits, eggs, cakes and seafood.

While China is not a major exporter of dairy products, it has one of the world’s fastest-growing dairy industries and it is also one of the world’s largest exporters of food and food ingredients, including meats, seafood, beverages and vitamins.

Read the rest:
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/01/world/asia/
01china.html?_r=1&hp&oref=slogin

Shame On The BBC: Poison in Chinese Food System Known For Years

October 31, 2008

Today the BBC reported that the poison melamine was widely used in many food products in China and that “the melamine scandal began early in September.”  Sorry BBC, but the New York Times reported a year ago last April (2007) that melamine was widely used in food products in China. 

They must not have the Internet in London because I found the New York Times report on melamine in China’s food supply on the Internet from April 2007 in just seconds.

My Vietnamese-born wife, who has been a guest of the communist prison and torture system said, “When you want to do business with communist China’s news media, you publish what they tell you or else.”

The BBC should be ashamed. 

China treats free and open media about the way the Obama campaign treats conservative reporters….
See:
Obama’s Staff Expells Conservative Newpaper Reporters

I lived and worked in China and farmers eagerly showed Westerners like myself how much pesticide and fertilizer they used (overused) which has now contaminated about 90% of China’s underground water supply.  We were also aware of the use of “thinners” like melamine 10 years ago.  The farmers in China didn’t know it was bad so they were not afraid to discuss its use…..

Here’s the report on melamine in China’s food supply from The New York Times from April 2007:
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ZHANGQIU, China, April 28, 2007 — As American food safety regulators head to China to investigate how a chemical made from coal found its way into pet food that killed dogs and cats in the United States, workers in this heavily polluted northern city openly admit that the substance is routinely added to animal feed as a fake protein.
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For years, producers of animal feed all over China have secretly supplemented their feed with the substance, called melamine, a cheap additive that looks like protein in tests, even though it does not provide any nutritional benefits, according to melamine scrap traders and agricultural workers here.

“Many companies buy melamine scrap to make animal feed, such as fish feed,” said Ji Denghui, general manager of the Fujian Sanming Dinghui Chemical Company, which sells melamine. “I don’t know if there’s a regulation on it. Probably not. No law or regulation says ‘don’t do it,’ so everyone’s doing it. The laws in China are like that, aren’t they? If there’s no accident, there won’t be any regulation.”

Melamine is at the center of a recall of 60 million packages of pet food, after the chemical was found in wheat gluten linked this month to the deaths of at least 16 pets in the United States.

No one knows exactly how melamine (which is not believed to be particularly toxic) became so fatal in pet food, but its presence in any form of American food is illegal.

The link to China has set off concerns among critics of the Food and Drug Administration that ingredients in pet food as well as human food, which are increasingly coming from abroad, are not being adequately screened.

Above: Ariana Lindquist for The New York Times

“They have fewer people inspecting product at the ports than ever before,” says Caroline Smith DeWaal, the director of food safety for the Center for Science in the Public Interest in Washington. “Until China gets programs in place to verify the safety of their products, they need to be inspected by U.S. inspectors. This open-door policy on food ingredients is an open invitation for an attack on the food supply, either intentional or unintentional.”

Now, with evidence mounting that the tainted wheat gluten came from China, American regulators have been granted permission to visit the region to conduct inspections of food treatment facilities.

The Food and Drug Administration has already banned imports of wheat gluten from China after it received more than 14,000 reports of pets believed to have been sickened by packaged food. And last week, the agency opened a criminal investigation in the case and searched the offices of at least one pet food supplier.

The Department of Agriculture has also stepped in. On Thursday, the agency ordered more than 6,000 hogs to be quarantined or slaughtered after some of the pet food ingredients laced with melamine were accidentally sent to hog farms in eight states, including California.

Read the rest
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/30/business/worldbusiness/30
food.html?ex=1335672000&en=b143bd4a5d0684b6&ei=5124&p
artner=permalink&exprod=permalink

China’s Food: Poison Melamine May Be In Nearly Everything

October 31, 2008

The toxic chemical melamine is probably being routinely added to Chinese animal feed, state media has reported.

Correspondents say the unusually frank reports in several news outlets are an admission that contamination could be widespread throughout the food chain.

BBC

The melamine scandal began early in September, when at least four Chinese babies were killed by contaminated milk, and thousands more became ill.

A worker labors behind a stack of eggs before they are packaged ... 
A worker labors behind a stack of eggs before they are packaged at a major chicken eggs production factory in suburban Beijing, China, Friday, Oct. 31, 2008. Three more Chinese brands of eggs containing melamine have been identified and a local government has acknowledged that officials knew about the contamination for a month before it was publicly disclosed.(AP Photo/Andy Wong)

The news led firms across Asia to recall products made from Chinese milk.

The problem widened last weekend when the authorities in Hong Kong reported that melamine had also been detected in Chinese eggs.

Four brands of eggs have since been found to be contaminated, and agriculture officials speculate that the cause was probably melamine-laced feed given to hens.

Melamine is high in nitrogen, and the chemical is added to food products to make them appear to have a higher protein content.

‘Open secret’

Several state newspapers carried reports on Thursday suggesting that the addition of melamine to animal feed was widespread.

Read the rest:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7701477.stm

Realted:
China Says It Will Tighten Control of Feed Industry; After Years of Evidence of Poisoned Animal Feed

1,500 Chinese raccoon dogs die from tainted feed

October 21, 2008

Some 1,500 dogs bred for their raccoon-like fur have died after eating feed tainted with melamine, a veterinarian said Monday, raising questions about how widespread the industrial chemical is in China’s food chain.

The revelation comes amid a crisis over dairy products tainted with melamine that has caused kidney stones in tens of thousands of Chinese children and has been linked to the deaths of four infants.

The raccoon dogs — a breed native to east Asia whose fur is used to trim coats and other clothing — died of kidney failure after eating the tainted feed, said Zhang Wenkui, a veterinary professor at Shenyang Agriculture University.

“First, we found melamine in the dogs’ feed, and second, I found that 25 percent of the stones in the dogs’ kidneys were made up of melamine,” said Zhang, who performed a necropsy — an animal autopsy — on about a dozen dogs.

Zhang declined to say when the animals died, but a report Monday in the Southern Metropolis Daily said the deaths occurred over the past two months.

The animal deaths were a reminder of last year’s uproar over a Chinese-made pet food ingredient containing melamine that was linked to the deaths of dozens of dogs and cats in the United States and touched off a massive pet food recall.

It was not immediately clear how the chemical entered the raccoon dog feed. But in the tainted milk scandal and last year’s pet food recall, melamine was believed to have been added to artificially boost nitrogen levels, making products seem higher in protein when tested.

At the time, China’s product safety authorities revoked the business licenses of questionable firms, announced tougher guidelines and increased inspections. But the countless small, illegally operating manufacturers found throughout the country make monitoring difficult.

“It’s still happening because it’s enormously profitable. It’s much cheaper to put melamine in as a nitrogen source than to put a real source in,” said Marion Nestle, a professor of nutrition, food studies and public health at New York University who wrote a book about the tainted pet food scandal.

“You’re going to have this kind of thing until you have a food safety system that’s adequate to oversee what’s going on or provide enough of a deterrent that people doing this think there’s too much of a chance they’re going to get caught,” she said.

Bonnie Glaser, a senior associate with the Freeman Chair in China Studies at the Washington-based Center for Strategic and International Studies, agreed.

“This is a problem throughout China where you have incentives that exist to produce things in a cheaper way to make greater profits, and people circumvent the regulations,” she said. “The (central government) is trying to eliminate this, but the problem is that for the few factories you close down, there’s another factory that pops up.”

Raccoon dogs are not the only animals in China that have fallen victim to melamine-tainted products — a lion cub and two baby orangutans developed kidney stones last month at a zoo near Shanghai.

Hospital officials said the three baby animals had been nursed for more than a year with milk powder made by the Sanlu Group Co., which is at the center of the tainted milk crisis.

Melamine has been found in a wide range of Chinese-made dairy products over the past few months. The government is still trying to win back consumer confidence after tainted products turned up on store shelves around the world.

When ingested by humans, melamine — which is used in plastics and fertilizers…

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081020/ap_on_re_as/as_china_
tainted_milk;_ylt=AgP1y_nTwwwpCbbIk8K_jKqs0NUE

Tainted feed kills 1,500 dogs in China

October 20, 2008
BEIJING (AP) — Some 1,500 dogs in northeast China have died after eating animal feed tainted with the same chemical that contaminated dairy products and sickened tens of thousands of babies nationwide, a veterinarian said Monday.

The raccoon dogs — a breed native to east Asia that is raised for its fur — were fed a product that contained the chemical melamine and developed kidney stones, said Zhang Wenkui, a veterinary professor at Shenyang Agriculture University. All of the dogs died on farms in just one village.

Zhang determined that the animals died of kidney failure after performing a necropsy — an animal autopsy — on about a dozen dogs. He declined to say when the deaths occurred but a report Monday in the Southern Metropolis Daily newspaper said they had occurred over the past two months.

“First, we found melamine in the dogs’ feed, and second, I found that 25% of the stones in the dogs’ kidneys were made up of melamine,” Zhang told The Associated Press in a telephone interview.

The Southern Metropolis Daily also blamed the deaths of several hundred dogs on melamine, but it was not immediately clear how the chemical would have entered the raccoon dog feed. In the ongoing milk scandal, melamine was said to be added to watered-down milk to artificially boost nitrogen levels, making products seem higher in protein when tested.

Raccoon dogs take their name from their fur, which resembles that of raccoons, and is used to make clothing, especially coats.

The animal deaths raise questions about the extent of the chemical’s presence in the country’s food chain.

Melamine has been found in a wide range of Chinese-made dairy products and foods with milk ingredients over the past few months. The government is still trying to win back consumer confidence after those tainted products turned up on store shelves around the world.

Four Chinese babies’ deaths have been blamed on infant formula that was laced with melamine. Some 54,000 other children were sickened.

Last year, melamine-tainted wheat gluten, a pet food ingredient made in China, was blamed for the deaths of dozens of dogs and cats in North America.

When ingested by humans, the industrial chemical — used in plastics and fertilizers — can cause kidney stones as the body tries to eliminate it and, in extreme cases, can lead to kidney failure. Infants are particularly susceptible.

Read the rest:
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2008-10-
20-china-dogs-melamine_N.htm?csp=34

Can Bill Gates Help Africa Feed Itself?

September 26, 2008

By VIVIENNE WALT / PARIS

The global economy might be reeling from the shakeout on Wall Street, but two of the world’s richest businessmen are vowing to spend tens of millions of dollars more – not on bolstering their own companies, but in helping the world’s poorest. With Congress locked in talks over a mammoth bailout package, Bill Gates and Howard Buffett (Warren’s oldest son) announced at the United Nations on Wednesday that their private foundations will plow more than $75 million into helping small farmers in Africa and Latin America to sell their crops as food aid – a move which could potentially overhaul the decades-old – and often criticized – global food aid system.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/time/
20080926/wl_time/canbillgateshelpafric
afeeditself;_ylt=ApHUu1wIyx9Gy6HcdK.mNmis0NUE

Forget oil, the new global crisis is food

January 6, 2008

By Alia McMullen
Financial Post (Canada)
January 04, 2008
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A new crisis is emerging, a global food catastrophe that will reach further and be more crippling than anything the world has ever seen. The credit crunch and the reverberations of soaring oil prices around the world will pale in comparison to what is about to transpire, Donald Coxe, global portfolio strategist at BMO Financial Group said at the Empire Club’s 14th annual investment outlook in Toronto on Thursday.
Corn grows in a farm field near Seneca, Illinois. Rising demand for grain to make fuel, food and livestock feed has helped push the prices of corn and soybeans.Scott Olson/Getty ImagesCorn grows in a farm field near Seneca, Illinois. Rising demand for grain to make fuel, food and livestock feed has helped push the prices of corn and soybeans.
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“It’s not a matter of if, but when,” he warned investors. “It’s going to hit this year hard.”

Mr. Coxe said the sharp rise in raw food prices in the past year will intensify in the next few years amid increased demand for meat and dairy products from the growing middle classes of countries such as China and India as well as heavy demand from the biofuels industry…..

Read the rest:
http://www.financialpost.com:80/story.html?id=
213343