Archive for the ‘Farmers’ Category

Vietnam Farmers Sue Vedan for Damage to Aquaculture

October 23, 2008

By Nguyen Dieu Tu Uyen

Oct. 23 (Bloomberg) — Vietnamese farmers will sue Vedan Vietnam Co. a monosodium-glutamate maker, for damaging aquaculture by releasing untreated waste into a river, Vietnam News reported, citing Nguyen Van Phung, vice president of the Ho Chi Minh City Farmers Association.

Many farmers are now in debt after more than 300 hectares (741 acres) of land in Thanh An commune in Ho Chi Minh City that farmed clams and oysters have become severely polluted and can no longer be cultivated, the report said, citing Phung.

The Vietnamese government earlier this month suspended Vedan Vietnam’s operations and fined the company for improperly discharging effluent and chemicals into the Thi Vai River near Ho Chi Minh City. Vedan Vietnam is a unit of Hong Kong-based Vedan International Holdings Ltd.

Inflation and Food Shortages?

March 28, 2008

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
March 29, 2008

There could be darker clouds ahead as inflation in seval parts of the globe is causing governments to diminish food exports.

Today Vietnam, the world’s second-biggest rice exporter, said it would cut exports by 22% this year, following similar moves by India and Egypt.

Analysts said the government of Vietnam wanted to stabilise domestic food prices.

Farmers work in a rice field in Dong Anh District in Hanoi,Vietnam, ...
 Farmers work in a rice field in Dong Anh District in Hanoi,Vietnam, Wednesday, March 26, 2008. A sharp rise in the price of rice is hitting consumer pocketbooks and raising fears of public turmoil in the many parts of Asia where rice is a staple.(AP Photo/Chitose Suzuki)


Vietnam’s inflation hit an estimated 16.4 percent in the first quarter, the highest rate in 13 years, according to government figures. Food prices were a main component of the increase, rising 21.5 percent in the January-March period compared with the same months last year.

In December Vietnam’s inflation rate was 10%.

The BBC reported Global rice prices have soared by 50% in the past two months raising supply concerns across many sectors of the world.

AFP reported from Egypt today that an advisor to the Commerce Minister announced a cutback in rice exports.

“We have taken this decision to provide for the needs of the local market,” Sayyed Abul Komsan, advisor to Commerce Minister Mohammed Rashid, told AFP.

Workers clean rice for packing at a market. Egypt is to suspend ...
Workers clean rice for packing at a market. Egypt is to suspend rice exports for six months, from April until October, to try to meet the demands of its own people hit by soaring food prices.(AFP/File/Tang Chhin Sothy)

“Rice is a staple food in Egypt and the main substitute for dough whose price has gone up following wheat price rises on the international market,” he explained.

Thailand, the world’s largest rice exporter, could face a shortage of rice at home after skyrocketing prices world-wide have encouraged traders to substantially increase their export volumes, Prasert Kosalwit, the director-general of the Rice Department, said yesterday.

The Philippines and Cambodia already have rice shortages.  Both countries import most of their rice from Vietnam and Thailand.

China subsidies

While rice prices have risen primarily because of increasing demand from population growth, they have also been lifted by poor recent crops in Vietnam.

Vietnam has been battling with rice infection and a small invasion of insect pests for two crop seasons.  China has sid it fears its own rice harvest will be impacted.

Neighbouring Cambodia has also recently introduced limits on rice exports.

China is the world’s biggest rice producer, but almost all of its crop is kept for the domestic market.

With the world’s largest population to feed, Beijing keeps rice prices subsidised.

It said on Friday that it would now pay farmers more for both rice and wheat in an attempt to boost crop production and cool surging inflation.

Related:
 Vietnam rice troubles could affect region

Lowly Rice Grain Impacts Global Economy

China storms cause $7.5B in damages

February 1, 2008
By CHRISTOPHER BODEEN, Associated Press Writer 

BEIJING – Three weeks of crippling snow storms across China have inflicted $7.5 billion in damages, the government said Friday, as it announced a $700 million relief fund for farmers.

The freakish weather — the country’s worst in five decades — has paralyzed China’s densely populated central and eastern regions just as tens of millions of travelers were seeking to board trains and buses to return home for this month’s Lunar New Year.

The storms have killed at least 60 people, closed roads, disabled the rail system, destroyed crops and exacerbated a coal shortage, forcing power plants to shut down and factories to cut production.

At a news conference….

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/china_snow;_ylt=AoRX
XiP25zvsEqVcgyqn40qs0NUE

Vietnam’s Catfish Farmers: Off The Hook

December 27, 2007
Thursday December 27, 2007

HANOI, Dec 27 Asia Pulse – The Association of Catfish Farmers of America (CFA) and US catfish processors have removed the names of 27 Vietnamese tra and basa exporters from the list of companies subject to the fourth administrative review, according to the Vietnam Association of Seafood Exporters and Producers (VASEP).

On August 31, 2007, the plaintiff in the catfish dumping lawsuit informed the US Department of Commerce (DOC) of the names of Vietnamese companies subject to the fourth annual administrative review.

However, the law firm Akin Gump Straus Hauer & Feld LLp, representing the plaintiff, sent a letter on December 20 to the DOC Secretary, announcing that the plaintiff has agreed to remove the names of 27 Vietnamese companies from the list. The DOC will conduct an administrative review of tra and basa exports to the US by Vietnamese companies between August 1, 2006 and July 31, 2007.

The 27 Vietnamese companies which have been removed from the list of those subject to review are: Afiex An Giang; Agifish; Anvifish Co., Ltd; Basa Co., Ltd; Cataco; Caseamex; Cafatex; Caseafood; CL-Fish Co., Ltd; Seaprodex Da Nang; Coseafex; East Sea Seafoods Joint Venture Co., Ltd; Gepimex 404; limited companies: Hai Nam, Hai Vuong, Hoan An, Hung Vuong, Kim Anh; Mekongfish; Nam Viet (NAVICO); Ngoc Thai; South Vina; Vietnam Fish-One Co., Ltd; Vinh Hoan (ong Thap); Vinh Hoan Corporation; Imex Cuu Long and Vinh Quang Fisheries Corporation.

All other companies named on the August 31, 2007 list will be subject to the fourth review.

The US catfish farmers brought suit against Vietnamese filet tra and basa producers five years ago, the result of which was the DOC’s decision to impose anti-dumping tax rates on Vietnamese companies’ exports. Every year, the DOC conducts an administrative review of named exporters, which decides appropriate tax rates for the companies.

Despite the anti-dumping tax rates imposed on exports to the US, Vietnam is still able to export a large volume of catfish globally, with turnover nearly reaching the US$1 billion level.

The demand for catfish keeps increasing on the world market. Exports to Russia, the second biggest market for Vietnam’s tra and basa fish, resumed after food hygiene problems were settled. Vietnam’s export products now meet the strict requirements set by major importers (the EU, US, Russia and Australia).

In the first three quarters of 2007, the EU remained the biggest importer of tra and basa from Vietnam, consuming 46.2 per cent in terms of quantity and 49 per cent in terms of export turnover. Russia is the second biggest export market for Vietnam’s catfish, followed by ASEAN countries, the US, Ukraine and Mexico.

(VNA)

Related:
Vietnam: China’a Seafood Exports Slide as Vietnam’s Boom

Tricky Vietnamese Truth About Catfish

Communist Vietnam blaming foreign forces for democracy protests

September 8, 2007

By Bill Gertz
Backgrounder 

U.S. officials say the communist government in Vietnam has broken its silence on public protests over land claims by asserting that foreign hostile forces are behind the unrest.

Rallies have been held from June through August in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City. Party and military newspapers have identified senior monks of the outlawed Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam and two leading pro-democracy dissidents for their alleged roles in seeking to exploit the protests.

The monks were identified as UBCV leaders Thich Quang Do and Thich Khong Tanh, and the pro-democracy activists are Nguyen Khac Toan and Hoang Minh Chinh.The Vietnamese army newspaper called them “dirty puppets” over overseas forces. And the Communist Party daily compared them to two traitors in Vietnamese history, Le Chieu Thong and Tran Ich Tac. Thong, the last king of an 18th century dynasty, is known for inviting the Chinese to invade in an effort to retain his position. Tac, a 13th century prince, is known for surrendering to a Mongolian army in order to become king.

The Party commentary said the two monks and two dissidents will “be exposed and spat on” by the Vietnamese people like the earlier traitors.

The demonstrations have received no press attention in the West.

Related:
Vietnam: U.S. Congresswoman Expresses Concern

As illegal land grabs increase, so does unrest in China

Vietnam: Farmers Protest Government Land Seizures

Vietnam: Some Suspect Up to 100 Dead in Protest Movement

July 21, 2007

Peace and Freedom has been unable to corroborate this report from Afriquenligne, the French language on-line news service consortium serving Africa.

Report received July 21, 2007

An eyewitness report coming out of The Socialist Republic of Vietnam states that Police in Ho Chi Minh City have detained about 200 political protesters and are being blamed for the deaths of over 100.

Farmers were protesting the government’s seizures of land and “free expression.” The protesters were peacefully demonstrating outside a government office on Wednesday, June 27 in order for the Vietnamese Government to return property it has seized and occupied since late 1975, when the South Vietnamese government was capitulated.

Vietnamese living in the United States are holding memorial services on Sunday, July 22 in cemeteries and memorials focusing on the Vietnam War.

“The crackdown on this demonstration shows Hanoi continues to curtail people’s rights. If Vietnam really has joined the community of nations, it should tolerate dissent, not crush it,” said deputy Asia director at Human Rights Watch, Sophie Richardson.

Thus far, the Vietnamese government has denied all allegations, stating that they did not detain any of the protesters, that no one was harmed, and the protesters returned to their homes peacefully and of their own will. However several Vietnamese in the country have been unable to contact family members who were part of the demonstration.

A Wikinewsie personally witnessed the police roundup of the demonstrators while on the way to a shop near the airport, when police began using nets to capture and drag the protesters, then throwing them in the back of a Vietnamese military vehicle.

Related:
Vietnam: Farmers Protest Government Land Seizures

Vietnam: U.S. Congresswoman Expresses Concern