Archive for the ‘fanaticism’ Category

Race Issue Marring Election Unnecessarily

March 14, 2008

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom

This is an election featuring a Black Man and a White Woman – but mentioning that fact might get you accused of racism, bigotry, fanaticism, zealotry and other forms of treachery.

Take Geraldine Ferraro, for example.  She was quoted recently is a California newspaper saying, “If Obama was a white man, he would not be in this position. And if he was a woman [of any color] he would not be in this position. He happens to be very lucky to be who he is. And the country is caught up in the concept.”

Former vice-presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro addresses ... 

Obama surrogates unloaded on her; inferring if not saying outright that she was a racist.

Hillary, instead of running to her friend’s assistance, said, “I didn’t say it.”

Many in the Black American community acted appalled.

Give me a break.

This came closely on the heels of another firestorm caused when an Obama advisor called Senator Clinton a “Monster.”

Even Bill Clinton, once referred to as “The First Black President,” has taken the heat and been tarred and feathered as a bigot from Black Church pulpits.

Sum up all the criticism from Black toward white and you find one word in the undercurrent: division.

The only guy that hasn’t taken too much heat for his over the top language is long-time Obama pastor Reverend Jeremiah A. Wright Jr.  He said “God Bless America” should be changed to “God Damn America,” he implied that America deserved the carnage of September 11, 2001, and he more than hinted that the KKK was running things in America. 

Barack Obama, Rev. Jeremiah Wright

Not divisive, right?

If you think it is, I dare you to criticize him.  The Black Leader Union will attack you for sure.

When a recent study reported that one quarter of America’s teenage girls has a sexually transmitted disease, you just about had to read the fine print before you saw that the study also concluded that fully fifty percent of the teenage Black girls had an STD. To use this fact in a headline, one newspaper editor told me, would be “Journalistic suicide.”

You cannot fix problems until you face them.  And it is difficult to face issues unless and until you can discuss them.

So the Black Leadership Union of America has created and fosters an atmosphere of ignoring facts and not facing the truth.  This allows them to perpetuate the idea that White people are holding the Black population back.  And it allows these so-called Black Leaders to sustain their “positions,” “reputations” and don’t forget donations.

Bill Cosby is among just a handful of Black Leaders that has been critical of his own Black people. For his efforts he has been roundly criticized by other members of the Black American Leadership Union and called an “Uncle Tom” in many churches.

I spend a significant amount of time in the Asian-American community.  Last Sunday we taught English as a Second Language to Vietnamese-American immigrants and just yesterday I worked with Korean-Americans on their language skills.

When I asked them about race being used in this election and all the reflections and facets of that use, I was simply told by Asian-Americans, “It’s not polite.”

Last night during a public appearance, while refusing to talk about her controversial comment about Obama, Geraldine Ferraro made the audience pause when she took a shot at how Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas — a Republican and the second black judge to sit on the court — gained admittance to Yale University’s law school.
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“Take a look and think about Justice Thurgood Marshall,” said Ferraro, referring to the first black judge to sit on the high court, “who drew on his life experiences as an African-American and as a civil-rights activist to write some of the greatest civil-rights decisions of the sixties and of the entire century.” Then she said that she did not think Thomas showed the same “sensitivity” as Marshall. Thomas, Ferraro said, acts as a rubber stamp for conservative Justice Antonin Scalia and “votes against affirmative action, which got him into Yale.”

Geraldine, you apparently just don’t get it.  Despite laws protecting your freedom to speak out, the Black Leader Union is watching you now and they’re ready to pounce.

Is this good for America, do you think?

I am not a racist.  But I expect I’ll be accused of that because of this essay.

The plain things nobody can say

March 14, 2008

By Wesley Pruden
The Washington Times
March 14, 2008

We’re doomed to a bitter, rancid presidential campaign, fraught with peril, and not just for John McCain. For Barack Obama, too. And let’s not forget Hillary, as a lot of people are eager to do.
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The Obama campaign, if not necessarily the man himself, seems determined to make tough questioning of the man and his qualifications off-limits. Mild, general criticism is OK, barely, but pressing too hard with the wrong questions is taken for racism, bigotry, fanaticism, zealotry and other forms of treachery. Once upon a time, presidential candidates labored mightily to find a log-cabin birthplace in their past, but some Democrats think they’ve come up with a candidate born in a manger.
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As the sheen on the Obama image dissipates, as sheen surely will under the full weight of a presidential campaign, American voters will expect to indulge their right to say what they think about the candidates. If they must be ever-so-careful to criticize Barack Obama in the robust and rowdy way they feel free to criticize everybody else, reticence will quickly become resentment, and ultimately, just in time for November, revulsion. Sen. Obama deserves better.
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Racism, the unpardonable sin in modern America, has made race the unmentionable subject, no matter how delicately broached or innocently discussed. Such good faith as the speaker may bring to the conversation no longer counts for very much. With her airy comment to a California newspaper, the Torrance Daily Breeze, suggesting that Barack Obama wouldn’t be the marketing man’s dream if he were not a black man, Geraldine Ferraro made herself a candidate for boiling in oil. (Extra-virgin olive oil, you might be tempted to say, if she were anyone but an Italian-American.) She concedes she was chosen by Walter Mondale for his running mate because she was a woman and what she actually said about the senator from Illinois was inartfully phrased: “If Obama were a white man, he would not be in this position. He happens to be very lucky to be who he is. And the country is caught up in the concept.”
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This is what you can hear, privately expressed by any number of prominent Democrats, some of them white and some of them black. The Clintons have done themselves and, more important, the nation ill by their desperate and not-so-subtle invocation of race. Barack Obama is not wholly innocent, either. Bubba has taken heat, for example, for describing Sen. Obama’s description of his public record as “a fairy tale.” This sounds at first hearing a cruel dig at gays, but no, it was taken as a racist taunt. We weren’t told why.
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Now two more prominent Democrats have entangled themselves in the snare that is the mark of the campaign. Mark Penn, the chief Clinton strategist, told reporters that “we believe the Pennsylvania primary will show that Hillary is ready to win, and that Sen. Obama really can’t win the general election.”
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That’s one man’s opinion, worth less than what Hillary’s paying for it. He later tried to revise his remarks (but only congressmen get to do that, and only in the Congressional Record), saying that losing the Pennsylvania primary would raise questions about Sen. Obama’s ability to win. Then Nancy Pelosi, the House speaker, scoffed that there would be no “dream ticket” of Hillary and Obama, or of Obama and Hillary. “Take it from me,” she said. “That won’t be the ticket.”
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Knowing better, perhaps, she declined to say why. But she’s probably reflecting the conventional unstated wisdom in Washington: You can’t expect to break both the color line and the glass ceiling in one election. When someone asked the speaker what she thought of Geraldine Ferraro’s earlier remarks, she replied: “It’s important that perceptions be understood by the campaigns.”
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This is the kind of code speak we’re all required to use. It’s unfair to Barack Obama, it’s unfair to his opponents whoever they are, and it’s unfair to the rest of us. We’ll know we’ve eliminated racism, the real thing, when we can all talk like grown-ups, in front of one another.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/article/20080314/
NATION01/92656787