Archive for the ‘end game’ Category

Five years in Iraq: a deep disquiet in the US

March 20, 2008
By Peter Grier 

Washington – The Iraq war has been perhaps America’s bitterest lesson since Vietnam in the realities of war and geopolitics – profoundly altering ordinary citizens’ sense of their country, its essential abilities, and the overall role it plays in the world.
US soldiers take up positions to provide cover for fellow soldiers ... 
U.S. soldiers in Iraq. Photo by: (AFP/File/David Furst)

Poll after poll shows that Americans are worried about US troops. They’re distressed at the war’s rising human and financial cost and are fully aware of the globe’s rising tide of anti-Americanism. Most of all, they may be confused – unsure of how the United States got here, uncertain about what to do next, and in doubt about how, and when, the conflict will end.

“It’s just become a mess, and I don’t think there’s an easy end to it, so we’re going to end up in a quagmire,” says Ben Lem, a Boston-area cafe owner.

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http://news.yahoo.com/s/csm/20080320/ts_csm/airaqthree;_ylt=AnLfuECgvS
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How will the Iraq war end?

March 18, 2008

By Peter Grier
The Christian Science Monitor
March 18, 2008

By Peter Grier 

WASHINGTON – On the fifth anniversary of the Iraq war, progress is slow but violence is down. A three-part series on the war’s effects starts today with a look at what the endgame might look like.
Iraqi soldiers hold Iraqi national flags as they march during ... 
Iraqi soldiers hold Iraqi national flags as they march during a graduation ceremony in Besmaya Range Complex March 18, 2008. The graduation ceremony was held for the 4th Brigade of the 5th Division of the Iraqi Army.REUTERS/Mahmoud Raouf Mahmoud (IRAQ)

The Iraq war might end like this:

•Iraqi Shiites, Sunnis, and Kurds uneasily share power and wealth in a single state. Sectarian violence, as well as terrorism linked to Al Qaeda, are diminished but not eliminated. Overseeing all this are perhaps 30,000 to 50,000 US troops, deployed in Iraq for years, maybe decades.

•Iraq is partitioned, accompanied by a return to the widespread sectarian violence of 2006 – times two.

Five years after the invasion of Iraq, those scenarios might be the best and worse cases that the United States now can aim for. One key to the outcome may be how long the US stays engaged in the expensive, drawn-out conflict.

From the point of view of the US, the Iraq war might be over when a president simply declares an endpoint. To an Iraqi, it might take much longer than that. Iraq today might be only at the midpoint, even the beginning, of a cycle of epic geopolitical change, say some analysts in a Monitor survey of experts in the region as well as in the US. For evidence, look at the Balkans….

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 http://news.yahoo.com/s/csm/20080318/ts_
csm/airaqone;_ylt=AnfYm4
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