Archive for the ‘Eliot Spitzer’ Category

Senator Obama: Black Extremist?

March 20, 2008

By Thomas Sowell
The Washington Times
March 20, 2008

There is something both poignant and galling about the candidacy of Barack Obama.
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Any American, regardless of party or race, has to find it heartening that the country has reached the point where a black candidate for president sweeps so many primaries in states with overwhelming white majority populations.
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We have all seen the crowds enthralled by Barack Obama’s rhetoric and theatrical style. Many of his supporters put their money where their mouths were, so that this recently arrived senator received more millions of dollars in donations than candidates who have been far more visible on the national stage for far more years.
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That’s the good news. The bad news is that Barack Obama has been leading as much of a double life as Eliot Spitzer.
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While talking about bringing us together and deploring “divisive” actions, Mr. Obama has for 20 years been a member of a church whose minister, Jeremiah Wright, has said “God Bless America” should be replaced by “God d… America” — among many other wild and even obscene denunciations of American society, including blanket racist attacks on whites.

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama speaks to ...
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama speaks to supporters during a campaign stop in Charlotte, North Carolina March 19, 2008. Many U.S. voters have been shocked by the sentiments expressed by Obama’s pastor.
REUTERS/Chris Keane


Nor was this an isolated example. Fox News Channel has played tapes of various sermons of Jeremiah Wright, and says it has tapes with hours of more of the same.
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Mr. Wright’s actions matched his words. He went with Louis Farrakhan to Libya and Mr. Farrakhan received an award from his church.
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Sean Hannity began reporting on Jeremiah Wright back in April 2007. But the mainstream media saw no evil, heard no evil and spoke no evil.

Louis Farrakhan

Related:

Obama: Racist or Just Extremist? 

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20080320/COMMENTARY07/
487905761/1012/COMMENTARY

Eliot Spitzer and The Belushi Syndrome

March 17, 2008

By Bill O’Reilly
The Washington Times
March 17, 2008

Let’s analyze the Eliot Spitzer situation without emotion because there are lessons to be learned here. First of all, Mr. Spitzer is obviously a smart guy, having graduated from Princeton and Harvard Law School. So his conduct is perplexing in its stupidity.

New York Governor Eliot Spitzer announces his resignation in ... 

Mr. Spitzer made his reputation as a tough prosecutor. He understood money transfer traces, wiretaps, informants and the rest of the law enforcement landscape. He also knew how to build cases against powerful people who were doing shady things.
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So he was no huckster preacher trying to make bucks off God while privately playing games with the devil. And he was no Wilbur Mills, the Arkansas congressman who got drunk out of his mind with a stripper in the back seat of his limo. No, Mr. Spitzer is a completely different animal.
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If you watch cable TV news, you will hear the braying pack talk about Mr. Spitzer’s arrogance, his “I’m above it all” mentality. But if you examine the facts, this shallow analysis doesn’t wash.
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Mr. Spitzer had to know that repeated visits with people breaking the law — prostitutes — put him at enormous risk. At any time, any one of those ladies might have been arrested and, facing prosecution, could have easily offered authorities his name in return for all charges being dropped.
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The ladies also could have blackmailed Mr. Spitzer, could have sold their stories about him to the tabloid media, could have done many things to destroy his life.
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Then there’s the money. He knew wire transfers to offshore facilities are closely monitored as a part of terrorist surveillance. One of the ways the Bush administration has damaged al Qaeda has been to choke off its funding. Banks and the Internal Revenue Service closely watch money moved to and from the U.S.
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Mr. Spitzer also knew that talking on the telephone to pimps, people setting up liaisons with prostitutes, left him open to being tapped — especially because the ladies for hire were being moved across state lines, which makes it a federal offense. Mr. Spitzer knew all of the above.
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So you’re telling me that Eliot Spitzer thought he wouldn’t get caught? Sure, and I’m Paris Hilton.

No, what’s in play here is what I call the “Belushi Syndrome.” That’s when a famous person who has money and success subconsciously tries to destroy himself. You see it all the time — movie stars, athletes, politicians doing incredibly stupid stuff.
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By all accounts, comedian John Belushi was repeatedly warned by his wife and closest friends that his rampant drug use could kill him. Nevertheless, he continued to take deadly combinations of heroin and cocaine, knowing the danger involved.
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Death found him at age 33.

Dan Aykroyd (left) and John Belushi.

The Blues Brothers: Dan Aykroyd (left) and John Belushi..
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Eliot Spitzer also knew the danger he was facing. But some kind of deep self-loathing propelled him to dismiss the inevitable. I mean, think about it: You are a sitting governor, spending tens of thousands of dollars on hookers? Come on. Maybe Caligula could get away with that, but not an American politician in a tabloid age.

This is not some dime-store psychoanalysis. There are many people walking around who are deeply self-destructive, and who will hurt themselves and others around them. That’s a fact.
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A self-destructive, self-loathing personality will find a way to blow everything up, and it doesn’t matter what kind of career the person has. We all know people like this. Stay away from them.
 

Bill O’Reilly is a nationally syndicated columnist and the host of the Fox News show “The O’Reilly Factor” and author of the book “Who’s Looking Out For You?”

Thinking You Are “Above the Little People”

March 16, 2008

By Thomas Sowell
The Washington Times
March 16, 2008

What was he thinking? That was the first question that came to mind when the story of New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer’s involvement with a prostitution ring was reported in the media.
Eliot Spitzer looks at a chart at a press conference in New ... 
It was also the first question that came to mind when star quarterback Michael Vick ruined his career and lost his freedom over his involvement in illegal dog fighting. It is a question that arises when other very fortunate people risk everything for some trivial satisfaction.
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Many in the media refer to Eliot Spitzer as some moral hero who fell from grace. Mr. Spitzer was never a moral hero. He was an unscrupulous prosecutor who threw his power around to ruin people, even when he didn’t have any case with which to convict them of anything. Because he used his overbearing power against businesses, the anti-business left idolized him, just as they idolized Ralph Nader before him as some sort of secular saint because he attacked General Motors.
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What Eliot Spitzer did was not out of character. It was completely in character for someone with the hubris that comes with the ability to misuse his power to make or break innocent people.
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After John Whitehead, former head of Goldman Sachs, wrote an op-ed column in the Wall Street Journal, criticizing Attorney General Spitzer’s handling of a case involving Maurice Greenberg, Mr. Spitzer was quoted by Mr. Whitehead as saying: “I will be coming after you. You will pay the price. This is only the beginning and you will pay dearly for what you have done.”
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When you start thinking of yourself as a little tin god, able to throw your weight around to bully people into silence, it is a sign of a sense of being exempt from the laws and social rules that apply to other people.
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For someone with this kind of hubris to risk his whole political career for a fling with a prostitute is no more surprising than for Michael Vick to throw away millions to indulge his taste for dog fighting or for Leona Helmsley to avoid paying taxes — not because she couldn’t easily pay the taxes and still have more money than she could ever spend but because she felt above the rules that apply to “the little people.”
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What is almost as scary as having someone like Eliot Spitzer hold power is having so many pundits talk as if this is just a “personal” flaw in Mr. Spitzer that should not disqualify him for public office. Mr. Spitzer himself spoke of his “personal” failing as if it had nothing to do with his being governor of New York.

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