Archive for the ‘drugs and alcohol’ Category

Teen Sex, Exploitation, Drugs and Alcohol (Again) – Who is Using Who (Or What)?

April 29, 2008

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom

Again we find ourselve discussing American culture and its rancid down side.

Fifteen year old pop star Miley Cyrus posed for celebrity photographer Annie Leibovitz.

The photographs, which some have called erotic child porn or nearly so, are to appear in the upcoming issue of Vanity Fair.  If they are not child porn they are at least “partially clothed.”
 
Vanity Fair.  The cover of the June issue of Vanity Fair and the photograph of Miley Cyrus, inset.

Ms. Cyrus, alread the teen star of the Walt Disney Company’s billion-dollar “Hannah Montana” franchise, financial analysts say, will be worth $20 million by the time she is 18 years old.

Now Ms. Cyrus, daughter of singer Billy Ray Cyrus, claims she was used by Ms. Leibovitz and Vanity Fair.
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She says she’s been wronged.

“I took part in a photo shoot that was supposed to be ‘artistic’ and now, seeing the photographs and reading the story, I feel so embarrassed,” Cyrus said Sunday in a statement through her publicist. “I never intended for any of this to happen and I apologize to my fans who I care so deeply about.”

Well, gosh, even a 15 year old daughter of an American pop star knows how to get publicity, sell records and make more money. Sex in America sells and she knows it and so does her dad, the photographer and Vanity Fair.

Ms. Leibovitz is a renowned celebrity photographer whose edgy, sexy portraits have included subjects such as Angelina Jolie, Scarlett Johansson and a naked, pregnant Demi Moore.

She’s pretty well known. Sitting for her isn’t an accident waiting to happen. It is an entertainer hoping to become mega-rich.
In this April 14, 2008 file photo singer and actress Miley Cyrus ...
In this April 14, 2008 file photo singer and actress Miley Cyrus arrives at the 2008 CMT Awards in Nashville, Tenn.(AP Photo/Evan Agostini)

Ms. Cyrus told PEOPLE Magazine, “My goal in my music and my acting is always to make people happy. For Vanity Fair, I was so honored and thrilled to work with Annie [Leibovitz].”
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PEOPLE also reported that Ms. Cyrus appears to be topless, but was actually clothed during the shoot.

Keep your 15 year old daughter in view in your teaching and in your prayers. If she reports she is sitting for Vanity Fair photographers, she probably knows what she’s doing. Get her an IRA. And make sure she knows how to use a condom, unlike one other pop star: Jamie Lynn Spears.


Jamie Lynn Spears
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Because we have seen so many people ruin their lives due to the agony of addiction, we sometimes shed light upon the “rich and famous.”  They are not immune from the ravages of drugs and alcohol.  Far from it.  In fact, because many entertainers and celebrities have a lot of “disposible” money (Amy Winehouse, who was arrested for cocaine possession and use, is reportedly worth $20 million) they can even mnore easily slip into addiction than some others.
Troubled soul singer Amy Winehouse, pictured on January 18, ... 
Troubled soul singer Amy Winehouse, pictured on January 18, 2007 after some serious drug use, was admitted that week to a rehabilitation clinic to help her battle against drug addiction, her record company said.

Last week sexy model and movie actress Angie Everhart was arrested for driving under the influence (DUI).

Wikipedia speaks about her career this way:

Following a playful photo session with her mother and the submission of the results to a local modeling agency, Everhart was on a plane to Paris later that year. By the end of the following year, she had graced the covers of such fashion mainstays as ELLE and Glamour magazine (for which she was the first-ever red-haired cover girl). Though a riding accident in which she broke her back at the age of 19 nearly put an end to her aspirations, Everhart eventually recovered through physical therapy. Early in her career, Everhart was advised she would never be a top model because she was a redhead. However, she succeeded in her chosen career and posed for numerous publications. She appeared in several issues of the annual Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition, starting in 1995. After years of publicly insisting she would never pose nude, Everhart did just that for the February 2000 issue of Playboy. She was ranked #98 on the FHM 100 Sexiest Women of 2003.

Everhart made her film debut in 1993 with the Arnold Schwarzenegger action-comedy Last Action Hero. She has since appeared in such features as Tales From the Crypt Presents: Bordello of Blood (1996), Denial (1998), Trigger Happy (1996) and Gunblast Vodka (2000).

Angie Everhart, 2003

Other movies she has appeared in include Jade (1995), and Executive Target (1997), Since then, her feature film roles have been restricted to low budget erotic thrillers and softcore porn, such as Another 9 1/2 Weeks (1997) and Bare Witness (2001). She also appeared in the 2004 television series Celebrity Mole: Yucatan, in which she was the rogue agent sabotaging the group. She was one of the “Gingers” on the second season of The Real Gilligan’s Island  (the other was Erika Eleniak), but left the show when she accidentally cut her finger severely enough to sever tendons and require surgery. Angie was also a panelist on “To Tell The Truth” from 2000 to 2001.

Here is a woman that recovered from a broken back.  She has a lot to live for.  We pray that she gets her life straightened out — and fast.


 

High Prescription Drug Use and Abuse in Colleges

March 8, 2008

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
March 9, 2008

American college students use and abuse prescription drugs like never before.  They are following in the always dangerous and sometimes deadly steps of celebrities.
alprazolam 2mg tablet bottle

alprazolam 2mg tablet bottle

Actor Heath Ledger died from an accidental overdose of prescription medications including painkillers, anti-anxiety drugs and sleeping pills, the New York City medical examiner’s office said.  Britney Spears, Lindsay Lohan and other “celebrities” have also been known to take these medications.  Used together — and with alcohol — these drugs have an unpredictable impact, can be addictive and are sometimes fatal. 

Lohan in a frightful piblicity photo.

And the shooters in the most violent campus multiple-killings, at Virginia Tech and Northern Illinois University, have both had some history with a mixture of prescription medications.
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The journal Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine recently reported that compared to college students taking prescription drugs for medical reasons, those who use medications without a prescription are more likely to abuse illegal drugs.  The report also gave information on the high number of our college students using such drugs as sleep aids and anti-depressants.

Sean Esteban McCabe, Ph.D., M.S.W. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) says that in the last decade there has been a dramatic increase in prescription rates of medications – such as stimulants, opioids, and benzodiazepines – that are likely to be abused in the United States.

“These increases are likely the result of many factors, including improved awareness regarding the signs and symptoms of several disorders, increased duration of treatment, availability of new medications and increased marketing,” said Dr. McCabe. “The increases in prescription rates have raised public health concerns because of the abuse potential of these medications and high prevalence rates of non-medical use, abuse and dependence, especially among young adults 18 to 24 years of age.”

Most people familiar with today’s young people, the Hollywood tabloids and other information sources can readily conclude what drugs are most used and abused.

Painkillers, anti-anxiety drugs and sleeping pills are the most used and abused drugs among our college students and throughout our society, experts say.

According to Medical News Today, Dr. McCabe used a Web survey of 3,639 college students to acquire information about prescription drug use and potential drug abuse. The average age of the sample was 19.9 years. Students were asked if they used prescribed or had used without a prescription.

Students were also asked if they had experienced drug-related problems like engaging in illegal activities to obtain drugs, having withdrawal symptoms, or developing medical problems due to drug use.

Results of the survey are summarized below:

–59.9% reported medically using at least one of the four drugs with a prescription

–About 20% reported taking them without a prescription for non-medical reasons

–39.7% reported that they had used the drugs only by prescription

–4.4% used medications, but were not prescribed them

–15.8% reported using some medications, both with and without prescriptions

The researcher also found that students who reported using drugs without prescriptions were more likely to screen positive for drug abuse compared to students who never used them or who had only used them for medical reasons.

Dr. McCabe believes that physicians should be extremely careful when prescribing commonly abused drugs to college students.

“Clearly, appropriate diagnosis, treatment and therapeutic monitoring of college students who are receiving abusable prescription medications is crucial, not only to improve clinical outcomes but also to help prevent the abuse of these medications within a population that is largely responsible for its own medication management,” he writes.

“Finally, any efforts aimed at reducing non-medical use of prescription drugs will have to take into consideration that these drugs are highly effective and safe medications for most patients who use them as prescribed.”

There is another insidious implication of Dr. McCabe’s study.  If college students are taking these drugs at an alarming rate; when did they start?  For most, they start down this path while in high school or before.

Some of the Commonly Abused Medications

Oxycodone, a painkiller, is the active ingredient in the prescription drug OxyContin. Hydrocodone, another painkiller, is often combined with acetaminophen, as in the prescription drug Vicodin. Diazepam, sold under the commercial name Valium, is used to relieve anxiety, muscle spasms, and seizures and to control agitation caused by alcohol withdrawal. Temazepam, brand name Restoril, is prescribed in the short term to help patients fall asleep and stay asleep through the night.

Alprazolam, commonly known under the brand name Xanax, is part of a class of medications called benzodiazepines used to treat anxiety disorders and panic attacks by decreasing abnormal excitement in the brain.

Doxylamine, found in common “nighttime sleep aids,” is an an antihistamine that causes drowsiness as a side effect and is used in the short-term treatment of insomnia. (It is also used, in combination with decongestants, to relieve cough and cold symptoms.)

Ambian is a nightime sleep aid that is often abused and can be addictive.

The painkillers oxycodone and hydrocodone are opiates, which are dangerous when combined with anti-anxiety medicines like diazepam, alprazolam and temazepam. According to a Drug Enforcement Administration Web site, oxycodone is often abused and an acute overdose can cause respiratory arrest and death.

Diazepam is sold under the brand name Valium and alprazolam is sold under the name Xanax. Temazepam is also used as a sleep aid and sold under the name Restoril. Doxylamine, a sleep aid and antihistamine, is an active ingredient in a number of over-the-counter medications, including NyQuil.

Related:
Northern Illinois Univ Killer Took Usual Deadly Cocktail Of Prescribed Drugs

AP probe finds drugs in drinking water

Teen Prescription Drug Abuse: Alarming Facts