Archive for the ‘democracy advocates’ Category

Vietnamese Calling for Democracy, Rule of Law

December 29, 2007
Buddhist dissident Thich Quang Do calls for democratic rights and freedoms to guarantee territorial integrity in Vietnam
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PARIS, 28th December 2007 (IBIB) – In the wake of widespread demonstrations staged by students and young people outside Chinese Embassies in Hanoi and Saigon, and strong protests by the Vietnamese community overseas, the Most Venerable Thich Quang Do, prominent dissident and Deputy leader of the outlawed Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam (UBCV) has issued a strong statement on the controversy over the disputed Paracel and Spratly archipelagos. Sent clandestinely from the Thanh Minh Zen Monastery in Saigon, it was received by the International Buddhist Information Bureau in Paris today.Writing on behalf of the UBCVâ’s Bi-Cameral leadership (the Institute of the Sangha and the Institute for the Dissemination of the Dharma), Thich Quang Do called on the Hanoi authorities to “pass the reins of power to the people in a society based on the separation of the three powers, multi-party democracy and the rule of law” as the best way to safeguard Vietnam’s sovereignty and territorial integrity.Because “three million Communist Party members and a 500,000-strong army have neither the authority nor the power to defend the homeland by military means, nor sufficient prestige and courage to expand political and diplomatic efforts to mobilize international support in our defence: they need the full participation of the 85 million Vietnamese population and the support of the Vietnamese Diaspora worldwide.”

As a first step, Hanoi must “immediately abrogate Article 4 of the Vietnamese Constitution [on the political monopoly of the Communist Party], and enable all sectors of the Vietnamese population, including all religious and political families, to freely and fully participate in the process of national salvation.”

The UBCV Deputy leader also called on Hanoi to summon the people for a “Dien Hong” Conference for the XXIst century to “initiate a process of reconciliation and democratic change.

Thich Quang Do emphasized the role of Buddhism as an essential element in this process :  “With our responsibility as Vietnamese citizens, and as representatives of a religion that has contributed to the foundation and development of our nation over the past 2,000 years, the Council of the Bi-Cameral Institute of the Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam cannot stand by silently whilst our country is in danger. We therefore solemnly appeal to the Vietnamese intelligentsia, inside and outside Vietnam, to stand together and rally forces to save our nation. The Council of the Bi-Cameral Institute of the Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam pledges to give its active support to every peaceful effort to protect our homeland and our people.”

Conclusion: With our responsibility as Vietnamese citizens, and as representatives of a religion that has contributed to the foundation and development of our nation over the past 2,000 years, the Council of the Bi-Cameral Institute of the Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam cannot stand by silently whilst our country is in danger. We therefore call upon the Vietnamese intelligentsia, inside and outside Vietnam, to stand together and rally forces to save our nation. The Council of the Bi-Cameral Institute of the Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam pledges to give its active support to every peaceful effort to protect our homeland and our people.For more information see:
INTERNATIONAL BUDDHIST INFORMATION BUREAU
(BUREAU INTERNATIONAL D’INFORMATION BOUDDHISTE)
Official information service of Vien Hoa Dao, Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam
B.P. 63 – 94472 Boissy Saint Léger cedex (France) – Tel.: Paris (331) 45 98 30 85
Fax : Paris (331) 45 98 32 61 – E-mail : ubcv.ibib@buddhist.com

Web : http://www.queme.net
Related:
Vietnam Sovereignty: Danger Signals

Thailand Votes on Constitution: The Plot Thickens

August 18, 2007

What do a sexy female teenage rock star, one of the richest men in the world and a pack of angry generals have in common?  Politics in Thailand, naturally! 

[The referendum in Thailand is over and the new constitution passed.  See
Thailand voters approve new constitution   ]

By John E Carey and our
Contributors Inside Thailand
August 18, 2007

On Sunday, the people of Thailand will likely adopt the constitution developed by the ruling military junta governing Thailand.

The junta occurred last September and ousted popular democratically elected President Thaksin Shinawatra. Mr. Thaksin, thought to be one of the world’s richest men, showed kindness to Thailand’s poverty stricken. Thaksin went so far as to find ways to funnel money to the poor – a practice Thailand’s generals saw as a threat to military authority and a way of “buying votes.”

The generals of the junta also accused Thaksin of keeping too many secrets and running a corrupt government. The new constitution increases transparency for senior leaders.

To make sure such heinous crimes as Mr. Thaksin’s alleged wrongs never happen again, Thailand’s new constitutional draft gives a lot more power to judges and bureaucrats and minimizes the voice of the people.

The current government of Thailand has sent copies of the 149-page draft constitution to all 18 million homes in Thailand.

And to make sure the resolution passes, the angry generals running Thailand have tilted everything heavily in the government’s favor.  Half the country is under martial law and a new law threatening prison for anyone convicted of obstructing the referendum has made the referendum’s passage almost a certainty.

But Mr Thaksin’s supporters want to see the constitution rejected.  They staged unruly protests for weeks in Bangkok and other cities urging rejection of the referendum.

Thaksin supporters say the charter justifies and endorses the creation of an illegitimate government by the military.

Although most Thais see the junta’s constitutional draft as a blow to Thai democracy, most will probably vote to adopt it during Sunday’s referendum. Polls show Thais eager for parliamentary elections, a carrot the junta has promised the people for December – if the new constitution passes on Sunday.

The generals and former generals running Thailand have made it clear that “the only right thing to do” is to vote yes on tomorrow’s referendum. Some 60% of eligible voters have said they will turn out.

“I think the constitution will be accepted because the government’s publicity campaign is very widespread throughout the whole country,” says Somchai Pakpatwiwat, a political science lecturer at Bangkok’s Thammasat University. “Thai democracy will go back in time to before the 1997 constitution, when the tenure of governments was very short. It’s the same old story.”

Critics of the junta and democracy advocates say the people will have less power under the constitution. A seven member panel of judges, for example, will elect about half the Senate.

Thailand’s biggest threat to the ruling judges and generals, it would appear, remains Mr. Thaksin himself. The junta has abolished his political party and ordered his arrest.

The wealthy Mr. Thaksin would have to be extradited from his new home in London – where he is reportedly living the high life. He recently purchased the English soccer club Manchester City – and he has been associating with Thai teenage rock star Lydia.

An enterprising young woman named Sunisa Lertpakawat went to London, interviewed Mr Thaksin, and wrote a syrupy book about the former prime minister.

She says her chatty book about Mr. Thaksin’s life and moods could have been called “Lonely Thaksin.”

“Although he tries to remain light-hearted, deep down in his eyes, I feel his hidden pain,” writes the author.

The book is actually named “Thaksin, Where Are You?”

When it was released earlier this month, the leadership of Thailand’s current government went ballistic. The author lost her Army job and most every copy of the book was seized and destroyed.

That notwithstanding, newspapers and magazines inside Thailand reported heavily – and glowingly on the book.

The Thai Prime Minister Surayud Chulanont, during his weekly TV talk program on Saturday,m said he hoped the turnout to be high and that the draft charter would be accepted at the referendum on Sunday.

A low turnout during Sunday’s referendum would be seen as a repudiation of the ruling junta – and a reaffirmation of Thailand’s desire for the democracy under Mr. Thaksin.

Related:
High Turnout Expected For Thailand’s Sunday Referendum