Archive for the ‘Dalai Lama’ Category

Dalai Lama: China Unfit To Be Superpower

December 5, 2008

China lacks the moral authority, including over the question of Tibet, to be a true superpower, the Dalai Lama said Thursday during a European tour that has angered Beijing.

After addressing the EU parliament in Brussels, the Tibetan spiritual leader said China “deserves to be a superpower” given its huge population and economic and military strength.

“Now one important factor is moral authority and that is lacking,” he told a press conference in Brussels.

AFP

Exiled Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama speaks to the press ... 
Exiled Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama speaks to the press at the EU Parliament in Brussels. China lacks the moral authority, including over the question of Tibet, to be a true superpower, the Dalai Lama said Thursday during a European tour that has angered Beijing.(AFP/John Thys)

“Because of its very poor record on human rights and religious freedom and freedom of expression and freedom of the press — too much censorship — the image of China in the field of moral authority is very, very poor,” he said.

“The sensible Chinese realize China should now pay more attention in this field in order to get more respect from the rest of the world,” the Nobel peace laureate said.

He cited the problems of Tibet and separatist factions in the southwestern Chinese province of Xinjiang as areas where such a moral authority should be displayed. He also named Hong Kong and reunification with Taiwan.

He said he continued to have confidence in the Chinese people while doubting the government wanted serious talks on Tibet’s future.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081204/wl_asia_a
fp/euchinatibetrights_081204183116

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Why Can’t France, Sarkozy Get International Respect?

December 2, 2008

In much of the world, President Nicolas Sarkozy enjoys a reputation for being something of a diplomatic dynamo. But Sarkozy and France get ignored, maligned, lectured and insulted often and loudly from one voice in Asia…..In China, the energetic French leader has a strikingly different standing than the one he enjoys almost everywhere else. In China, Sarkozy (and France) is the favorite international whipping boy……

By Bruce Crumley
Time Magazine

sarkozy
Business ties with China are likely to suffer if the French President goes ahead with his plan to meet the Dalai Lama.  Photo by Gerard Cerles / Pool / Reuters

The latest humiliation comes with Beijing’s decision to boycott the 11th annual China-European Union summit, which has been scheduled to open in Lyon today. China stunned E.U. officials last week by announcing that its delegation of more than 150 political and business leaders would stay at home because, in the words of China’s Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang, “the summit cannot be held in a sound atmosphere, nor can it achieve expected goals.” The reason? The French President’s plan to meet with Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama on December 6 as part of an event honoring fellow Nobel peace prize winner Solidarity leader Lech Walesa in Poland.

“China firmly opposes any contacts with the Dalai Lama by foreign leaders in whatever form,” Qin said in a statement released by the state-run Xinhua news agency. “We hope that France could fulfill its commitments, and properly deal with China’s major concerns in earnest so as to create conditions for the steady development of bilateral relations.”

Exiled Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama greets the audience ... 
Exiled Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama greets the audience before delivering a speech in Prague November 30, 2008.(David W Cerny/Reuters)

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http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8
599,1863013,00.html?xid=rss-world

Dalai Lama on Sex: More trouble Than its Worth

November 29, 2008

The Dalai Lama, the exiled Tibetan spiritual and temporal leader, on Friday said sex spelt fleeting satisfaction and trouble later, while chastity offered a better life and “more freedom.”

“Sexual pressure, sexual desire, actually I think is short period satisfaction and often, that leads to more complication,” the Dalai Lama told reporters in a Lagos hotel, speaking in English without a translator.

He said conjugal life caused “too much ups and downs.

–AFP
Exiled Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, gestures as ... 
Exiled Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, gestures as he speaks to the media after arriving in Prague November 29, 2008.REUTERS/David W Cerny (CZECH REPUBLIC)

“Naturally as a human being … some kind of desire for sex comes, but then you use human intelligence to make comprehension that those couples always full of trouble. And in some cases there is suicide, murder cases,” the Dalai Lama said.

He said the “consolation” in celibacy is that although “we miss something, but at the same time, compare whole life, it’s better, more independence, more freedom.”

Considered a Buddhist Master exempt from the religion’s wheel of death and reincarnation, the Dalai Lama waxed eloquent on the Buddhist credo of non-attachment.

“Too much attachment towards your children, towards your partner,” was “one of the obstacle or hindrance of peace of mind,” he said.

Revered by his followers as a god-king, the Dalai Lama arrived in Lagos on Friday on a three-day visit following an invitation from a foundation to attend a conference. He has made no political speeches in the west African country.

He leaves Friday night for the Czech Republic and then on to Brussels to address the European Parliament before heading to Poland, where he is due to meet with French President Nicolas Sarkozy.

The 73-year-old Nobel Peace laureate has been a mainstay on the diplomatic stage ever since he fled his native land for neighbouring India in 1959.

Still based in northern India, the Dalai Lama has increasingly been in the spotlight since protests in Tibet turned violent in March this year, just months before the Chinese capital Beijing hosted the Summer Olympic Games.

Regarded by his many supporters outside China as a visionary in the vein of Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, the Dalai Lama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989 for his accent on non-violence to achieve change.

However, he is reviled by the Chinese government, which has branded him a “monster” and accused him of trying to split the nation.

China calls Tibet youth group `worse than bin Laden’

November 26, 2008

A rundown two-story building in this Himalayan hill station might hardly seem to be the command center of a subversive group jangling the nerves of neighboring China. Monkeys clamber over the rooftop, and any stranger may walk through its front door.

Yet China calls the Tibetan Youth Congress “a terror group worse than (Osama) bin Laden’s” and accuses it of stockpiling guns, bombs and grenades in Tibet for use by separatist fighters.

By Tim Johnson, McClatchy Newspapers

China alleges that the 30,000-member group has allied itself with al Qaida and with a homegrown Muslim separatist organization in China, the East Turkestan Islamic Movement.

The president of the congress, Tsewang Rigzin, a former banker who lived in Minneapolis, scoffs at China’s charges, saying his group seeks independence for Tibet but adheres to non-violent principles put forth by the Dalai Lama, the exiled spiritual leader whose headquarters are here.

“These are all baseless and fallacious allegations that the Chinese are making,” Rigzin said over a meal of curry at a local restaurant, suggesting that the charges were scare tactics aimed at the Chinese citizenry.

If nothing else, the wildly different views of the Tibetan Youth Congress underscore the chasm between Beijing and Dharamsala over Tibet.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/mcclatchy/20081
126/wl_mcclatchy/3110248_1

China skirts UN’s questions on its torture record

November 10, 2008

China watchers are not at all surprised that the big communist nation dodges criticiism and investigation….and not for the first time….

By FRANK JORDANS, Associated Press Writer

GENEVA – China refused Monday to answer questions from a U.N. human rights panel about the alleged torture and disappearance of dissidents, or provide official figures on the mistreatment of detainees in its prisons.

Campaigners have long criticized the country for failing to live up to a 1984 U.N. anti-torture accord, citing the secrecy of its courts and the persecution of lawyers who highlight abuses.

Li Baodong, China’s ambassador to the United Nations in Geneva, said his government had “zero tolerance for torture” and was making progress in stamping out abuse.

“The concept of prohibition of torture is gaining widespread recognition among the judiciary,” he told a public meeting of the U.N. Committee Against Torture.

But Li and 31 other members of China’s delegation rejected requests for detailed information on issues such as forced disappearances and prisoner abuse.

Three years ago, the U.N.’s torture investigator said inmates told him they were forced to lie still for weeks, faced beatings with electric batons or sticks, or faced other ill-treatment. Human rights groups such as Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch also have documented cases where they say torture was committed by state officials.

Felice Gaer, one of the U.N. panel’s 10 members, said she had hoped to receive more specific answers from China during the two-day hearing, which began Friday.

“The problem is not the absence of statistics but the inability to make these statistics public,” she said.

Gaer also cited individual cases that China had been asked to explain, including the disappearance and prosecution of religious figures, human rights campaigners and lawyers.

Chinese officials addressed only one case, that of Gendun Choekyi Nyima, who in 1995 was chosen by the Dalai Lama to become the Panchen Lama, Tibetan Buddhism‘s second-highest ranking figure.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081110/ap_on_re_eu/un_un_china_torture_1

China in Dalai Lama talks offer

October 29, 2008

Chinese authorities are to arrange fresh talks with envoys of the Dalai Lama “in the near future”, the Chinese state news agency Xinhua has said.

From the BBC

The agency quoted an unnamed government official as saying the exiled spiritual leader of Tibet should “treasure this opportunity” and respond positively.

The Dalai Lama gestures as he begins three-days of Buddhist ... 
The Dalai Lama gestures as he begins three-days of Buddhist teachings in Dharamshala. China on Wednesday told Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama to treasure the opportunity of a fresh round of talks, as it confirmed the meeting would be held soon.(AFP/File/Lobsang Wangyal)

Last weekend, the Dalai Lama said he was losing hope that dialogue with China would achieve any settlement.

The Dalai Lama fled Tibet in 1959 after a failed uprising against Chinese rule.

Anti-China protests that erupted in March in Tibet – the worst in two decades – were crushed by Chinese security forces.

In the aftermath, China promised fresh talks over the disputed territory, but the Dalai Lama recently suggested such gestures were insincere.

‘Despite the riot’

Xinhua quoted the government official as saying that Chinese authorities would “arrange another round of contacts and negotiation with the private representatives of the Dalai Lama ‘in the near future’ at the request of the Dalai Lama side”.

The report said such talks would be held “despite the Lhasa riot in March and some serious disruptions and sabotages to the Beijing Olympic Games by a handful of ‘Tibet independence’ secessionists”.

Read the rest:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7696771.stm

Chinese Relentlessly Patrol A Subdued but Jittery Lhasa

April 15, 2008

Special to The Washington Post
Tuesday, April 15, 2008; Page A01
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LHASA, China — Two elderly Tibetan women lay prostrate before the Potala Palace on a recent day, venerating the 1,000-room hilltop monument that was once the seat of an independent Tibetan government and the Dalai Lama‘s winter residence.
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About 30 feet away, two helmeted Chinese guards observed the display of traditional Buddhist devotion. Elsewhere in the Tibetan capital, other guards barred entrance to the city’s most celebrated temples. Residents moved about their business, nervous and subdued.
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One month after the explosion of violence that catapulted remote Tibet into the international spotlight, protests over Chinese policies here continue to unfold in many parts of the world, undermining China‘s effort to make the 2008 Beijing Olympics a display of progress at home and amity abroad.

But here in Lhasa, the most visible outcome has been relentless street patrols by men in People’s Armed Police uniforms who carry automatic rifles, check Tibetans’ identification cards at random, and guard intersections and gasoline stations.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/04/14/AR2008041403089.html?hpid=moreheadlines

For India, Tibet Poses Some Delicate Issues

April 2, 2008

 By Rama Lakshmi

Washington Post Foreign Service
Wednesday, April 2, 2008; Page A09

NEW DELHI, April 1 — Angry Tibetans in India chanted all kinds of anti-China slogans last month when they gathered to protest the crackdown in their homeland. But one chant, in particular, seemed to be an ominous warning to the government in New Delhi: “China-India brotherhood is a Chinese deception!” the Tibetans shouted.

The chant was an expression of anger over India’s burgeoning diplomatic and economic ties with China. But it also reflected the contradictions in the Indian government’s policy as it tries to ensure free speech for its sizable ethnic Tibetan population while also maintaining a fragile partnership with its powerful neighbor.

India enjoys a trading relationship with China expected to be worth $40 billion this year. At the same time, it hosts the Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, his exile government and his followers. Authorities in Beijing have accused the Dalai Lama of fomenting the recent Tibet protests.

“It is a difficult position for India,” said Kanwal Sibal, a former Indian foreign secretary. “We gave asylum to the Dalai Lama and his followers on the condition that they would not conduct political activities on Indian soil. But the Tibetan government-in-exile is run from here.

“We have to weigh the costs of extending support to the Tibetans in a demonstrative way in the current situation against damaging our ties with China,” he said.

Speaking to reporters Tuesday, India’s current foreign minister, Pranab Mukherjee, said that the Dalai Lama was a “respected guest” and that India would continue to offer him hospitality. But the Dalai Lama should not do anything that could have a “negative impact on Indo-Sino relations,” Mukherjee warned.

India is home to about….

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/04/01/AR2008040102861.html?hpid=topnews

China: Tibetans planning suicide attacks

April 1, 2008
By CHRISTOPHER BODEEN, Associated Press Writer

BEIJING – China on Tuesday accused “Tibet independence forces” of planning to use suicide squads to trigger bloody attacks — the lastest in a string of accusations that have taken aim at supporters of the Dalai Lama.

Riot police try to detain Tibetan activists protesting outside ...
Chinese troops resisting Tibetan monks and other suicide attackers….
REUTERS/Adrees Latif (NEPAL)

The prime minister of Tibet’s government-in-exile denied the claims, saying Tibetans are committed to a “nonviolent path.”

“To our knowledge, the next plan of the Tibetan independence forces is to organize suicide squads to launch violent attacks,” Public Security Bureau spokesman Wu Heping said Tuesday.

“They claimed that they fear neither bloodshed nor sacrifice,” Wu told a news conference.

Wu offered no firm evidence to support his claims.

Beijing accuses the Dalai Lama and his supporters of orchestrating anti-government riots in Lhasa last month as part of a campaign to sabotage the August Beijing Olympics and promote Tibetan independence.

The 72-year-old Nobel Peace Prize winner has denied the charge, condemning the violence and urging an independent international investigation into the unrest and its underlying causes.

Prime Minister Samdhong Rinpoche of Tibet’s exiled government reiterated that position Tuesday.

“There is no question of suicide attacks,” said Rinpoche. “There is absolutely no doubt in our mind that we want to follow the nonviolent path.”

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080401/ap_on_re_
as/china_tibet;_ylt=Au
qno2c0ge5t6ieEQbVZn9Gs0NUE

China arrests suspects in Tibetan riots

March 31, 2008
By TINI TRAN, Associated Press Writer 

BEIJING – China lashed out at the Dalai Lama on Monday, accusing him of being a hypocrite who has deceived the west about his political agenda as authorities announced they had detained suspects in four deadly arson cases in Tibet.

Jiang Zaiping, the vice chief of the Public Security Bureau in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa, said investigators have taken into custody suspects responsible for arson attacks on three shops — including a clothing outlet where five young women were burned to death — and one in nearby Dagze county, the Tibet Daily newspaper reported Monday.

The fires killed a total of 12 people, state media has reported.

Authorities have taken 414 suspects into custody in connection with the anti-government riots, Jiang was quoted as saying. Another 298 people have turned themselves in, he said.

The Tibetan regional government also announced that the families of two of the women killed were given compensation of $28,170, the official Xinhua News Agency said.

It did not say how many suspects were involved in the four arson cases or give any other details.

An official who answered the telephone at the Lhasa Public Security Bureau said no senior officials were available to give details. He refused to give his name. It was unclear how many suspects had been directly involved in the four arson cases.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080331/ap_on_re_as/china_tibet_247