Archive for the ‘criticism’ Category

Bush criticized on Iraq, N.Korea

November 18, 2008

President Bush’s efforts to resolve two major foreign-policy challenges in his waning days in office have prompted double-barreled criticisms, with leaders here and abroad questioning concessions his administration has made to Iraq and North Korea.

House Armed Services Committee Chairman Ike Skelton said Monday that he was “deeply troubled” by a pending status-of-forces agreement (SOFA) with Iraq because it could result in American troops being prosecuted in Iraqi courts.

Across the globe, Japan and South Korea have gone public with rare dissent, saying they are worried over an agreement on how to verify North Korean pledges to give up making fuel for nuclear weapons.

Mr. Skelton, the leading House Democrat responsible for the U.S. military, said: “I do not believe it was wise to push off major decisions about the legal protections U.S. troops would have in such cases or the crimes for which they could be charged.”

By Sara A. Carter and Nicholas Kralev 
The Washington Times

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2008/
nov/18/bush-criticized-on-iraq-nkorea/

Criticism of China: New Freedom, and Peril, Online

April 17, 2008

By Ariana Eunjung Cha and Jill Drew
Washington Post Foreign Service
Thursday, April 17, 2008; Page A01

HAIKOU, China — Wang Qianyuan did not realize she would cause such a frenzy last week when she ran into a group of American students, Tibetan flags tied over their shoulders, getting ready for a vigil at Duke University to support human rights.
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She used blue body paint to write “Save Tibet” slogans on the bare back of one of the organizers but did not join their demonstration.
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Wang, a Chinese national, knew she was treading on sensitive territory. “But human rights are above everything,” she said later in a telephone interview. Even national pride.
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Before long, a video of the 20-year-old freshman, seen standing between pro-Tibet activists and Chinese counterprotesters, was posted on the Internet. Within hours, an angry mob gathered online, calling her a “traitor” who should be punished.
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Someone posted personal information about Wang on the Internet, including her national identification card number, as well as her parents’ address and phone number in China. “Makes us lose so much face. Shoot her where she stands,” one anonymous user wrote in a comment posted above Wang’s portrait from Qingdao No. 2 Middle School.
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In the wake of the violence that has rocked Tibet and the protests over the Olympic torch relay, online bulletin boards in China have erupted with virulent comments rooted in nationalist sentiments. On some sites, emotional Chinese have exchanged personal information about critics and hunted them down. Such situations have become so common that some users refer to the sites as “human flesh search engines.”
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The verbal onslaughts have been made possible in part by the Chinese government….

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/04/16/AR2008041603579.
html?hpid=topnews

A Tibetan shouts anti-China slogan during a protest in Gauhati, ...
A Tibetan shouts anti-China slogan during a protest in Gauhati, India, Thursday, April 17, 2008. Chinese cheerleaders and Tibetan protesters greeted the Olympic flame Thursday amid a massive security clampdown for the latest leg of the international torch relay in India, home to the world’s largest Tibetan exile community.(AP Photo/Anupam Nath)

Bill Clinton Rejects Criticism Over Race

March 17, 2008

By Beth Fouhy, Associated Press 

NEW YORK (March 17) – Former President Clinton is pushing back on criticism that he fanned racial tension while campaigning for his wife in South Carolina.

Win McNamee, Getty Images

In an interview with ABC’s “Good Morning America” broadcast Monday, Clinton said he had gotten a “bum rap” from the news media after he compared Democratic Sen. Barack Obama’s landslide victory in South Carolina’s Jan. 26 primary to Jesse Jackson’s wins in the state in 1984 and 1988. Clinton was widely criticized for appearing to cast Obama as little more than a black candidate popular in a state with a heavily black electorate.

“They made up a race story out of that,” Clinton said of the news media, calling the story “a bizarre spin.”

He made similar comments on CNN’s “American Morning,” calling the notion that he had unfairly criticized Obama in South Carolina as “a total myth and a mugging.”

While campaigning in South Carolina in January, Bill Clinton complained that Obama had put out a “hit job” on him. He didn’t explain what that meant.

At an MTV forum for college journalists Saturday, Clinton said he knew as soon as Obama won Iowa’s caucuses Jan. 3 that he was on his way to wrapping up a large majority of black voters in other primary states.

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http://news.aol.com/elections/story/_a/bill-clinton-rejects-criticism-over-race/20080317140909990002?ncid=NWS00010000000001

China: No to U.S. Missile Shot at Satellite

February 17, 2008

BEIJING (Reuters) – China is concerned by U.S. plans to shoot down an ailing spy satellite and is considering what “preventative measures” to take, the Foreign Ministry said on Sunday.

“The Chinese government is paying close attention to how the situation develops and demands the U.S. side fulfill its international obligations and avoids causing damage to security in outer space and of other countries,” spokesman Liu Jianchao said.

President George W. Bush has decided to have the Navy shoot the 5,000-pound (2,270 kg) satellite with a modified tactical missile after security advisers suggested its re-entry could lead to a loss of life, U.S. officials said on Thursday.

“Relevant departments in China are closely watching the situation and studying preventive measures,” Liu said in a brief statement posted on the Foreign Ministry’s Web site (www.fmprc.gov.cn).

On Saturday, Russia’s Defense Ministry said the U.S. plan could be used as a cover to test a new space weapon.

It will be the first time the United States has conducted an anti-satellite operation since the 1980s. Russia also has not conducted anti-satellite activities in 20 years.

China launched a ground-based missile into an obsolete weather satellite in January 2007, drawing international criticism and worries inside the Pentagon that Beijing has the ability to target critical military assets in space.

(Reporting by Ben Blanchard)

Related (with video):
Russia Says U.S. Satellite May Be “Space Weapon” Test

Navy Will Attempt to Down Spy Satellite

U.S. Navy Missile Destroys Dangerous Satellite

China calls on US to provide data on satellite shootdown

Gates says U.S. will share satellite destruction data with China

Graphic of operation to destroy US spy satellite. A US missile ...

Thailand: Banned Book Indicates “Fascist-Like” Regime

January 11, 2008

The West.com (Australia)
January 11, 2008

Thailand’s banning of a rare “warts and all” biography of revered King Bhumibol Adulyadej could risk an eventual explosion of pent-up political tension, an academic says.

“Banning books is usually something we associate with fascist and repressive regimes,” Australian anthropologist Annette Hamilton told a seminar on the book The King Never Smiles at an international Thai studies conference in Bangkok on Thursday.

“When silence is enforced for a long time, noise – when it comes – is deafening.”

Read the rest:
http://www.thewest.com.au/aapstory.aspx?StoryName=450734