Archive for the ‘crippled’ Category

Blizzard Strikes: What Happens in China Different From in the U.S.?

February 2, 2008

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom

When a major snowstorm hits; what are the differences between China and the U.S.?

Answer: Everything.

China is experiencing its worst winter storm in 50 years or more. The event has turned into a near-disaster as tens of millions of travelers have been stranded and more than a million troops have been mobilized both to provide peace and security and to remove snow.

Soldiers shovel snow at a square outside the Nanjing Railway ...
Soldiers shovel snow at a square outside the Nanjing Railway Station in Nanjing, Jiangsu province February 2, 2008. Emergency crews struggled on Saturday to restore power to parts of southern China blacked out for a week by heavy snow as forecasters warned of no quick end to the worst winter weather in 50 years.
(Jeff Xu/Reuters)

In one of China’s train stations, more people are stranded than the entire population of Boston.

At Shanghai’s Hongqiao airport, soldiers were sent out to remove the snow and ice from acres of runways and tarmacs: armed only with shovels.

Snow removal in the U.S. is difficult and costly yet relatively routine due to long term investment in plows, trucks, sand, chemicals and other things.

In China, snow is being removed by anything from brooms made from branches to hundreds of shovel wielding troops. There are virtually no modern American-style snowplow trucks.

In China today, the Prime Minister, all his top communist party dignitaries and President Hu Jintao are on the road ordering local party functionaries to remove snow and ice and trying to apologize to massive hoards of people with bullhorns.

In a howling blizzard with 200,000 people before you, how many people do you think you can reach with a battery powered bullhorn?

In many parts of China today, the electrical grid is broken and disrupted due to ice which brought down power lines.

When three electrical workers were killed while attempting repairs, the Prime Minister met with the families and state-controlled communist TV made the workers into national heroes.

In China today, we see the impact of millions of migrant workers with limited or no human rights. Sure, they produce a wonderment of goods for Good Old Communist Red China and we buy it. But now we see how it is all possible.

China’s economic boom is on the backs of the poor and abused.

China is, in a word, crippled by snow, ice and cold. Vital normal services are paralyzed: like coal delivery, electricity, water service and the food supply and distribution system.

We pray for our Chinese brothers and we also say to the centrally controlled communist government: what gives?

Related:
China Confirms Man Killed in Stampede; Winter Chaos Continues

Monday: China Covered in Snow, Fog, Displaced People