Archive for the ‘conservative’ Category

Thankful for interesting times

November 27, 2008

“May you live in interesting times” is supposed to be an ancient Chinese curse, but I can’t find evidence that the saying is Chinese at all, much less that it’s ancient. One of the earliest reliable citations seems to be a 1950 short story by the British science-fiction author Eric Frank Russell, writing under the pen name Duncan H. Munro, who quotes the imprecation and then adds: “It isn’t a curse any more. It’s a blessing.” 

By Eugene Robinson
The Washington Post
Thursday, November 27, 2008; Page A29

That’s the glass-half-full way of seeing this extraordinary moment. As we celebrate Thanksgiving and enter the holiday season, it feels as if our nation is at a cusp, a brink, a verge. It’s true that if things get much more “interesting,” we might have a collective nervous breakdown. But along with the anxiety, there’s also a sense of rare opportunity — a chance to emerge better than we were economically, politically and socially.

Easy for you to say, many people would respond, and they’d have a point. I’ve been as mesmerized and freaked out as anyone watching the stock market lose nearly half its value, then recover some ground, then oscillate so wildly that a 200-point gain or loss in the Dow is the new definition of a slow day. I’ve lost money (not that I had that much in the first place), but I haven’t been wiped out the way some people have. I don’t have an adjustable-rate mortgage or a house that’s “underwater.” My employer is still in business.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/w
p-dyn/content/article/2008/11/26
/AR2008112603250.html?hpid=opi
nionsbox1

Advertisements

Will Liberals, Democrats Hurt Free Media, Free Speech?

November 16, 2008

Now that the election is over, it is time to evaluate what the American public can expect from the newly elected Congress and the administration of President-elect Barack Obama.  

There are several major issues, some mentioned before in this column, which the liberal leadership may seek to enact into law. Moderate Democrats and Republicans as well as conservatives must resist them for the greater good of the country.

One straightforward issue the new administration will certainly push hard is the so-called Fairness Doctrine. Liberal radio personalities have been unable to make headway on commercial radio, so the only way for them to regain access to the airwaves is to re-impose this outdated and obsolete rule. The doctrine would require equal air time for differing political opinions broadcast over the public’s airwaves.

Paul Weyrich
The Washington Times
Sunday, November 16, 2008

The result of the proposed law, if enacted, would be to silence talk radio, a much hoped for liberal aim…

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2008/
nov/16/the-democrats-imminent-agenda/

The Electorate’s Left Turn: Sorry, GOP: Nation No Longer Leans Right of Center

November 16, 2008

Here’s the main thought Republicans are consoling themselves with these days: Notwithstanding President-elect Barack Obama, a nearly filibuster-proof Democratic majority in the Senate and the largest Democratic majority in the House of Representatives since 1993, the United States is still a center-right country. Sure, voters may be angry with Republicans now, but eventually, as the Bush years recede and the GOP modernizes its brand, a basically right-tilting electorate will come back home. Or, in the words of the animated rock band the Gorillaz, “I’m useless, but not for long/The future is comin’ on.”  

By Tod Lindberg
The Washington Post
Sunday, November 16, 2008; Page B01

Thus Rich Lowry, the editor of National Review, in Outlook last week: The United States “is indeed, as conservatives have been insisting in recent days, a center-right country.” On election night, former Bush guru Karl Rove opined on Fox News, “Barack Obama understands this is a center-right country, and he smartly and wisely ran a campaign that emphasized it.” And it’s not just conservative pundits and operatives singing this song. Take Newsweek editor Jon Meacham, who wrote an Oct. 27 cover essay entitled “America the Conservative,” which argued that Obama will have to “govern a center-right nation” that “is more instinctively conservative than it is liberal.”

The only problem: It isn’t true….

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/w
p-dyn/content/article/2008/11/13
/AR2008111303550.html

There Are Republicans That Can Challenge Obama With Kristol Clarity

November 16, 2008

It’s 2012 and President Barack Obama is running for re-election. He has had a moderately successful presidency, no big scandals, no big failures and a few triumphs. The big, global success of the Obama administration? A handsome African-American and his handsome family in the White House. What Republican will run against him with any hope of success?

By Arnold Beichman
The Washington Times
.
My candidate to oppose Mr. Obama’s second term bid is William Kristol, 56, editor of the Weekly Standard (circulation 84,000). Add to that distinction a Harvard doctorate, if you will. Plus an equally weighty consideration, a record as a Republican Party champion. In other words, an intellectual of the center-right who could stand up to Mr. Obama, a center-left intellectual. If visibility is wanted, Mr. Kristol is a regular commentator on the Fox News Channel and is a New York Times op-ed columnist. In other words, he’s great with the laptop and great on the tube and knows the issues forward and backward.


Mr. Kristol’s quarter-century career in government service is outstanding. It began as chief of staff for then Education Secretary William Bennett in the Reagan administration, then as chief of staff to Vice President Dan Quayle under the first Bush administration. He then moved into idea projects dealing with the GOP’s future, based on what he called a “Contract with America”:

“The fact that government is no longer going to be so generous with taxpayers’ money may be Scrooge-like, but it strikes me as rather responsible behavior. For too many years, some liberals have felt they were doing good by generously spending taxpayers’ money. Now Americans want to take a much harder look at what really does good and what does harm.”

Mr. Kristol is not joined at the hip with President Bush. When the White House nominated Harriet Miers to the U.S. Supreme Court, he spoke up in one of his harshest criticisms of the administration:

“I’m disappointed, depressed and demoralized. … It is very hard to….

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/
2008/nov/16/to-be-kristol-clear/

Mitch McConnell: Washington’s most important Republican and second-most consequential elected official

November 13, 2008

“I hope to have God on my side, but I must have Kentucky.

Abraham Lincoln

Which is how discerning conservatives felt while waiting to see if, in Election Day’s second-most important voting, Kentuckians would grant a fifth term to Mitch McConnell, leader of the Senate Republicans. They did, making him Washington’s most important Republican and second-most consequential elected official. This apotheosis has happened even though he is handicapped by, as National Review rather cruelly says, “an owlish, tight-lipped public demeanor reminiscent of George Will.”

Mitch McConnell

That disability is, however, a strength because it precludes an occupational hazard of senators — presidential ambition. Besides, McConnell, 66, is completely a man of the Senate. At 22, he was an intern for Sen. John Sherman Cooper and went from law school to the staff of Sen. Marlow Cook. Because McConnell has been so thoroughly marinated in the institution’s subtle mores and complex rules, he will wring maximum leverage from probably 43 Republican votes.

Which is why Democrats spared no expense in attempting to unhorse him, recruiting a rich opponent and supplementing his spending with $6 million from the national party. McConnell, to his great credit, had made himself vulnerable by opposing the “Millionaires’ Amendment” to the McCain-Feingold law restricting political speech. That amendment punished wealthy, self-financing candidates by allowing their opponents to spend much more than the law otherwise allows. Last summer, the Supreme Court struck down the amendment for the reasons McConnell opposed it, including this one: Government has no business fine-tuning electoral competition by equalizing candidates’ abilities to speak.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/w
p-dyn/content/article/2008/11/1
2/AR2008111202543.html?hpid=opinionsbox1

Ten Reasons to vote for McCain

November 3, 2008

10) Mr. McCain is much, much funnier than Barack Obama. But then, almost everyone is.

(9) Mr. McCain is a passionate patriot who has always been, and will always be, guided by what he thinks is best for America. He can trace his ancestry back to an officer on Gen. George Washington’s staff and his family has served the nation nobly in war and peace ever since. Mr. McCain believes in winning wars.

(8) Mr. McCain’s intimate familiarity with military matters also makes him less biddable by the armed services. He was able, when most others (most notably his opponent) were not, to see that a change of strategy in Iraq – not a retreat – was needed. He brings an informed skepticism to military procurement requests as well.

(7) As he told Rick Warren, Mr. McCain believes there is evil in the world and that it must be confronted. While Michelle Obama and many others seem to think our enemies will purr like kittens once we inaugurate a black man with an Islamic middle name, that is dangerous fantasy. When asked for an example of evil, Mr. McCain mentioned al Qaeda putting explosive vests on two mentally impaired girls and blowing them up by remote control in an Iraqi marketplace. Mr. Obama, whose turn of mind is different, cautioned that the problem is sometimes us: “a lot of evil has been perpetrated based on the claim that we were trying to confront evil.”

(6) Mr. McCain may not be a Ph.D. economist, but he understands that raising taxes and adopting protectionist trade policies will deepen and prolong this recession. Nor would he permit Nancy Pelosi and Harry Reid to push through the “card check” law – a union-backed measure that would reverse 73 years of labor law in this country by scuttling the secret ballot in union elections. Even George McGovern has denounced this job-killing, freedom-smothering law supported by Mr. Obama. Greater unionization will translate into lost productivity, inflationary pressure, and fewer jobs.

(5) John McCain will try to protect the unborn. Barack Obama is the most radical pro-abortion candidate ever to win a presidential nomination. Mr. Obama has promised to back the Freedom of Choice Act as his first presidential act, which would invalidate all restrictions on abortion at any stage of gestation – and even in cases where babies are born alive after an attempted abortion.

(4) Mr. McCain will employ diplomacy, not worship it. Mr. Obama is deluded about the power of “talks.” In 2007, he proposed, regarding Iran’s nuclear program: “if we are meeting with them, talking to them, and offering them both carrots and sticks, they are more likely to change their behavior.”

(3) John McCain has said his models for good judicial picks are John Roberts and Samuel Alito. Mr. Obama will pick Ralph Nader and Dennis Kucinich (just kidding, but his choices won’t be far off).

Read the rest from Mona Charen:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2008/nov/03/reasons-to-vote-for-mccain/

Washington Times Excluded From Obama Campaign Aircraft: And Responds

November 1, 2008

Editorial
The Washington Times
November 1, 2008
.
Reporter Christina Bellantoni of The Washington Times will be kicked off of Barack Obama‘s campaign plane starting Nov. 2, making it much more difficult to cover the candidate during the critical final days of the election. The Obama campaign insists that politics had nothing to do with it. We note that all three newspapers that had reporters booted from the plane — The Times, the New York Post and the Dallas Morning News — endorsed John McCain. An Obama spokesman insists that it is just a coincidence.

Aides to Mr. Obama told us Friday that the decision was made in part in order to accommodate his hometown newspapers, the Chicago Tribune and Chicago Sun-Times, which have not traveled with the candidate very frequently in the past. They also claim that the decision to kick The Washington Times off the Obama plane could not have possibly been due to this newspaper’s endorsement, which was published Tuesday. The Obama campaign insists that it notified Miss Bellantoni on Oct. 25 that it might not have room for her on the plane. Miss Bellantoni protested. Later that day she was told that she could stay on the plane until Friday night. Starting Monday, Miss Bellantoni sought an update about her status each day until Thursday. That afternoon, while covering an Obama rally in Florida, she learned that effective Nov. 2, she would no longer be traveling on Mr. Obama’s campaign plane.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill. ... 
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill. boards his campaign aircraft at the airport in Columbia, Mo., Friday, Oct. 31, 2008. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Upon learning of that decision, John Solomon, executive editor of The Washington Times, protested the decision to David Plouffe, Mr. Obama’s campaign manager. The decision “unfairly deprives her and this newspaper of the opportunity to cover the final 72 hours of a campaign that she has reported on with distinction from the beginning,” Mr. Solomon wrote. “Christina has traveled routinely with the Obama campaign from the start, pulled many shifts as the campaign pool reporter and been cited across the country for stories that were fair, balanced and insightful.” He also noted that The Times’ vast online readership places it in the Top 20 news sites in the United States. Moreover, Mr. Obama himself has recognized the importance of this newspaper’s work, citing two prominent examples: In June, Mr. Obama wrote a letter citing an investigative project by The Washington Times that highlighted government mistreatment of veterans. In his August acceptance speech at the Democratic National Convention, Mr. Obama prominently mentioned this newspaper’s interview with former Sen. Phil Gramm, in which he referred to a “mental recession” and a “nation of whiners.” More than a dozen other Democratic speakers also cited that interview, “clearly demonstrating the far-reaching relevance and impact of our news coverage,” Mr. Solomon wrote in an e-mail.

Shortly afterward, Mr. Solomon received a reply from from Anita Dunn, senior adviser and chief communications officer with the Obama campaign, telling him that that the demand for seats on the plane far exceeded supply, and “for logistical reasons, we made the decision not to add a second plane.” Added Mrs. Dunn: “We have a huge amount of respect for the reporting of Christina Bellantoni and this decision is by no means a reflection on her.” In an interview Friday with The Times, Jen Psaki, press spokeswoman for the Obama campaign, reiterated these points and claimed the decision could not have been retaliation for The Times endorsement of Mr. McCain because Miss Bellantoni was notified last Saturday that she might not be able to stay on the plane beyond Oct. 31. Sure.

This argument, however, collapses upon closer examination. For one thing, there is no getting around the fact that all three newspapers kicked off the plane just happened to endorse Mr. McCain. Moreover, Mr. Obama’s supporters have been furious with The Times when it publishes stories that are not favorable to their candidate. One was an Oct. 10 report by Barbara Slavin of The Times about Mr. Obama’s efforts to delay signing an agreement with the United States on the status of U.S. forces in Iraq. Another was a piece by reporter Joseph Curl pointing to Mr. McCain’s role in mobilizing support for the Iraq troop surge, which Mr. Obama opposed. Viewed in this context, the Obama campaign’s decision to remove Miss Bellantoni smacks of being the latest effort by Mr. Obama and his supporters to retaliate against reporters that ask tough questions. After Barbara West, a reporter on WFTV-TV in Orlando, had the temerity to ask some tough questions to Joe Biden, the Obama campaign cancelled an interview with Mr. Biden’s wife, Jill. Obama supporters even called for Miss West’s ouster. After a reporter for KYW-TV in Philadelphia pressed Mr. Biden too forcefully on some matters, the Obama campaign said it would grant no more interviews to the station. When WGN Radio in Chicago announced it would interview Stanley Kurtz, author of several unflattering investigative pieces about Mr. Obama, supporters of the candidate flooded the station with telephone calls and e-mails demanding that Mr. Kurtz not be put on the air. It is a disturbing pattern. If this is how Mr. Obama acts as a candidate, how would he treat the press as president?

Miss Bellantoni doesn’t deserve this shabby treatment and neither does The Times. It would be wiser to resist the impulse to punish those who ask hard questions and wiser still to show more respect for the free exercise of the press.

Obama’s Staff Expells Conservative Newpaper Reporters

October 31, 2008

According to the Fox News Channel, reporters from the Washington Times, New York Post and perhaps other conservative newspapers have been asked or told to remove their reporters from the Obama campaign aircraft…..

By The Washington Times
.
The Washington Times, which has covered the Barack Obama campaign from the start, was kicked off the Democrat’s campaign plane for the final 72 hours of the race.

The Obama campaign informed the newspaper Thursday evening of its decision, which came two days after The Times editorial page endorsed Senator John McCain over Mr. Obama. The Times editorial page runs completely independent of the news department.
.
“This feels like the journalistic equivalent of redistributing the wealth, we spent hundreds of thousands of dollars covering Senator Obama’s campaign, traveling on his plane, and taking our turn in the reporter’s pool, only to have our seat given away to someone else in the last days of the campaign,” said Washington Times Executive Editor John Solomon.

Above: Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill, talks on the phone aboard his campaign plane

“I hope the candidate that promises to unite America isn’t using a litmus test to determine who gets to cover his campaign.”

The Times formally protested the decision, noting that it has one of the top 20 largest newspaper Web sites in the country, distributes its print edition in the key battleground state of Virginia, and has had its stories repeatedly cited by Mr. Obama and other Democrats throughout the campaign.

“Sen. Obama himself demonstrated he appreciates the importance of The Washington Times and its news coverage. In June, he wrote a letter citing a Times’ investigative project that highlighted government mistreatment of our veterans. Sen. Obama requested an investigation by Congress and the administration, both of which confirmed the problems and led to corrective action at the VA. In his August acceptance speech, Sen. Obama also prominently mentioned our interview with Sen. Phil Gramm and the now infamous comments about a ‘mental recession’ and a ‘nation of whiners’,” wrote Mr. Solomon in an e-mail to Obama campaign manager David Plouffe.

Times reporter Christina Bellantoni, who has covered the Democratic campaign since 2007, is being asked to leave the campaign plane starting Sunday. In defending its decision, the Obama campaign said it respected Ms. Bellantoni’s reporting and simply ran out of seats on the campaign plane for the finale because of high demand. It also noted that the Obama campaign is allowing some news media critical of the Democrat to travel, including Fox News.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2008/oct/31/
washington-times-kicked-obama-plane-finale/

******************************

By Ben Smith, Politico

Obama spokesman Bill Burton confirms Drudge’s report that two right-leaning papers, the Washington Times and the New York Post, have lost their seats on the Obama plane, along with the Dallas Morning News.

“We’re trying to reach as many swing voters that we can and unfortunately had to make some tough choices. but we are accommodating these folks in every way possible,” he said.

The Post and the Morning News are both read primarily in states that aren’t in play, but the Washington Times is read in Northern Virginia.

Burton said the Chicago Tribune and the Chicago Sun-Times had returned to the plane, and confirmed that Ebony and Jet magazines have seats on the plane. (The Tribune has had a reporter on the plane for most of the cycle, but recently added a photographer.)

New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd said in an email that, contrary to Drudge’s suggestion, she won’t be on Obama’s plane.

“I’ll be at Saturday Night Live covering Tina Fey’s Sarah Palin and possibly the real John McCain,” she said.

Burton said the campaign was making space for the dropped outlets on the campaign bus where possible, and that they were encouraged to travel with Senator Joe Biden. He also noted that Fox News, whose schedule includes perhaps the most openly hostile programming to Obama, has a seat on the plane.

McCain barred Dowd and Time’s Joe Klein, two columnists seen as leaning toward Obama, from his campaign plane, and space has grown very tight on Obama’s in recent days. But Obama aides have also been heard to complain about the coverage from the New York Post and the Washington Times, if not as vociferously as they have about Fox News’s coverage.

The Times took an ideologically-charged shot at Obama in response to its barring, a reminder of the political undercurrent to the choice.

*******************************

From the Drudge Report

The Obama campaign has decided to heave out three newspapers from its plane for the final days of its blitz across battleground states — and all three endorsed Sen. John McCain for president!WASHINGTON TIMES and DALLAS MORNING NEWS have all been told to move out by Sunday to make room for network bigwigs — and possibly for the inclusion of reporters from two black magazines, ESSENCE and JET, the DRUDGE REPORT has learned.

The NY POST,

Despite pleas from top editors of the three newspapers that have covered the campaign for months at extraordinary cost, the Obama campaign says their reporters — and possibly others — will have to vacate their coveted seats so more power players can document the final days of Sen. Barack Obama’s historic campaign to become the first black American president.

MORE

Some told the DRUDGE REPORT that the reporters are being ousted to bring on documentary film-makers to record the final days; others expect to see on board more sympathetic members of the media, including the NY TIMES’ Maureen Dowd, who once complained that she was barred from McCain’s Straight Talk Express airplane.

After a week of quiet but desperate behind-the-scenes negotiations, the reporters of the three papers heard last night that they were definitely off for the final swing. They are already planning how to cover the final days by flying commercial or driving from event to event.

McCain targets liberals in sharpened stump speech

October 20, 2008

Republican John McCain and his supporters on Monday branded Democrat Barack Obama a liberal and criticized feminists and the media as they rallied their conservative base in Missouri, a hotly contested bellwether state, two weeks before the election.

In a stump speech sharpened for the second week in a row, the GOP presidential candidate defended his running mate, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, against attacks from the “feminist left.” And Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., introduced McCain by declaring him under siege by the “liberal elite media.”

“John’s been there and he’s met a little tougher people in his life than the liberal media,” Graham said in an allusion to McCain’s years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam.

Taking aim at Obama, Graham implored the crowd: “Show us that you understand and see a liberal when he’s standing out there in front of you. Make sure you show America that it does matter that you keep your word if you’re president of the United States.”

Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., ...
Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., speaks to supporters, Monday, Oct. 20, 2008, in St. Charles, Mo.(AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

By GLEN JOHNSON, Associated Press Writer

The sharper remarks and tone came as McCain appeared before a weekday crowd of 2,000 in this suburb north of St. Louis, where Obama drew 100,000 on Saturday. Aside from several new key phrases and adjectives, McCain kept to his recent economic focus and the crowd failed to pick up on of his some standard applause lines.

The Arizona senator did rouse the crowd when he reprised a line from the final presidential debate, during which he broke with his fellow Republican, President Bush.

“We can’t spend the next four years as we have spent much of the last eight: waiting for our luck to change,” McCain said in an amphitheater at New Town, a planned community freshly built in a former farm field.

“We have to act immediately. And as I said it at the last debate: I’m not George Bush; if Sen. Obama wanted to run against George Bush, he should have run for president four years ago. We need a new direction now. And we have to fight for it,” said McCain.

St. Charles County is fertile electoral ground for the McCain’s campaign. In 2004, Bush beat Democrat John Kerry by a margin of 59 percent to 41 percent.

As the nation moved right, Bush captured Missouri in 2000 and 2004, winning 53 percent statewide against Kerry, but this year the polls show a very close race in Missouri, which has voted for the presidential winner every year since 1900 but one, Adlai Stevenson in 1956.

McCain was roughly trailing the same path Obama took through the state over the weekend. He had an appearance Monday evening at Belton, south of Kansas City, where Obama drew 75,000 on Saturday. At midday, McCain stopped at a barbeque house in Columbia for lunch with small business owners. He labeled them “Joe the Plumbers, writ large,” referring to the Ohio plumber McCain has made a focal point for his criticism of Obama’s tax proposals.

Among those accompanying McCain was former Sen. John Danforth, an ordained Episcopal priest who remains widely popular in the state.

McCain opened his remarks in St. Charles by defending Palin against unspecified attacks.

“My friends, it’s remarkable the comments of the feminist left about Sarah Palin,” he said to a chorus of boos. “I want to tell you, I am so proud of the way she has energized America. She is a reformer, she is a great leader, she is the most popular governor in America, and I can hardly wait to introduce her to Washington, D.C.”

McCain’s selection of Palin was most recently, and prominently, criticized by his fellow Republican, former Secretary of State Colin Powell. On Sunday, he said McCain’s choice of Palin,,,,

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081020/ap_on_el_pr/mccain

Is Obama the End of Conservatism?

October 17, 2008

By Mona Charen
The Washington Times

All of a sudden, this election is shaping up as a verdict on capitalism. The Obama campaign wanted it to be about George W. Bush. The McCain campaign wanted it to be about character. But instead, because the markets are shooting off in all directions like bullets from a dropped pistol, the stakes have suddenly been raised dramatically.

We are in the midst of the worst panic in history, it’s true (because it is global). But as historian John Steele Gordon helpfully pointed out in the Wall Street Journal, panics are not unusual in American history. We’ve experienced them almost every 20 years since 1819. Mr. Gordon blames Thomas Jefferson, which is intriguing, but the point is that we’ve always emerged from these periodic paroxysms intact and our economy has continued to grow.

Mr. Gordon believes more sensible banking policy would prevent future panics. But if we elect a crypto-socialist like Barack Obama and give him a bigger Democrat majority in the House and a filibuster-proof Senate, banking regulation may be the least of our troubles.

Well, you may say, “Win some, lose some. McCain isn’t all that great anyway. Conservatives and Republicans will simply have to examine their consciences and come up with a winning strategy for next time.” Perhaps. But there are a few problems with that sanguine approach. In the first place, the Democrats can, with a super-majority, change the rules of the game. They can make the District of Columbia the 51st state with two new senators (guaranteed to be Democrats in perpetuity). They can reinstitute the so-called Fairness Doctrine that required radio stations to provide equal time to all political viewpoints. While the doctrine was enforced by the Federal Communications Commission, radio stations shied away from politics altogether. With the demise of the doctrine, conservative talk radio flourished. Liberal talk radio has never found much of an audience. Reviving the doctrine would kill one of the principal irritants to liberals and Democrats – to say nothing of disemboweling the First Amendment.

To elect a super-majority of Democrats at a time of economic….

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2008/
oct/17/the-end-of-conservatism/