Archive for the ‘Cindy McCain’ Category

McCain’s November Surprise: Best ‘SNL’ Ever (With Video)

November 2, 2008

Ya gotta love John Mccain.  Former Prisoner of War, Navy fighter pilot, “Maverick” of the Senate, and a really humorous guy….

By BETH FOUHY, Associated Press Writer

epublican John McCain poked fun at his presidential campaign‘s financial shortcomings and his reputation as a political maverick in an appearance on NBC’s “Saturday Night Live.”

The presidential hopeful made a cameo appearance at the beginning of the show, with Tina Fey reprising her memorable impersonation of McCain’s running mate, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin.

McCain, who is trailing Democrat Barack Obama in most battleground state polls, also appeared during the show’s “Weekend Update” newscast to announce he would pursue a new campaign strategy in the closing days of the campaign.

“I thought I might try a strategy called the reverse maverick. That’s where I’d do whatever anybody tells me,” McCain said.

And if that didn’t work, “I’d go to the double maverick. I’d just go totally berserk and freak everybody out,” the Arizona senator quipped.

Earlier in the show, McCain and Fey, portraying Palin, said they couldn’t afford a half-hour campaign commercial on network television like Democrat Barack Obama aired earlier this week. They said they’d sell campaign products on the QVC shopping channel instead.

Among other things, McCain advertised a set of knives to cut through pork in Washington. His wife, Cindy McCain, briefly appeared to advertise “McCain Fine-Gold” jewelry, a play on the campaign finance law McCain authored with Wisconsin Democratic Sen. Russ Feingold.

Fey, as Palin, advertised a set of “Joe” dolls commemorating Joe the Plumber, Joe Six Pack and her Democratic rival, Joe Biden.

The pretend Palin also pulled out T-shirts saying “Palin 2012” and said she wouldn’t be returning to Alaska after the election.

“I’m either running in four years or I’m going to be a white Oprah,” she said.

Link to the story and watch the video:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081102/ap_on_el_pr
/mccain_saturday_night_live;_ylt=ArF
9X1DJwUZJvnUsc4Eoqi6s0NUE

http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/player/popup/?rn=3906861&cl=10492093&ch=4226716&src=news
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Most Memorable SNL Appearance Ever?

From Robert Kubey
The Huffington Post

Sen. John McCain made one of most memorable political appearances in SNL history last night. In his opening sketch, and in the “Weekend Update” segment, in the lingo of the comedy world, he “killed.”

He humanized himself and demonstrated that he and his campaign could have a terrific sense of humor when the chip were down. He appeared incredibly relaxed, wonderfully self-effacing and winning.

Take nothing away from this guy, he did it all tonight and did it well.

He did his campaign some good tonight, after Gov. Palin’s appearance two weeks ago that I panned at the time. I thought that one was ill-advised but McCain’s came off well.

Sen. Obama, I think, made the right decision in not going on the program as had been rumored.

He is the frontrunner, after all, and needs to make no mistakes in the final days.

Meanwhile, about 40 minutes before SNL aired not long ago in the New York tri-state area and in the San Francisco Bay Area, a powerful attack ad on Obama ran inside a repeat airing of the previous week’s SNL episode hosted by “MadMen” star, John Hamm.

The ad resurrected Rev. Jeremiah Wright with incendiary speech excerpts, a photo of Wright and Obama standing very close to each other, and a woman’s narration culminating in words saying that Barack Obama was “Too Radical and Too Risky” for America.

It was a strong ad, one that I had predicted to my media and elections classes would air somewhat earlier in the campaign but also when Obama had less opportunity to respond.

Obama is probably most wise to avoid responding unless that line of attack, and other attacks, get worse in these last two days. He doesn’t want to draw new attention to the threat that Wright first posed back so many months ago.

Sen. Obama, in my opinion, has been a little cocky in some appearances earlier this week, mocking how John McCain would attack him, and that is just unwise when his main goal right now should be to attract more of the undecideds and mobilize his own get-out-the-vote effort, which he is doing superbly well.

But undecideds are undecided for a reason in every election. They don’t really have a dog in the fight and thus see any signs of conceit or cockiness in either candiate as unattractive. They are still taking the measure of both men. I always say that people unconsciously vote for the candidate they most want to watch on television the next four years and tonight, John McCain looked like he could be a lot of fun.

Fun is now what the country needs now, of course, and perhaps I’m wrong and McCain hurt himself tonight. He may well have.

The next 48 hours will be intense and critical, and so much has been looking so good for Sen. Obama that my political instincts tell me to watch out. When things look too good to believe in politics, they often are just that–too good to be believed. They might be true, but I wouldn’t bet the family farm quite yet.

We could have recounts in our future and nightmarish legal challenges.

Of course, if Obama wins with 40 or more electoral votes than are needed, and seems to be pulling away at the end, continuing to ride his tsunami of momentum, then recounts and legal challenges are just in our worst imaginings.

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Cindy McCain sheds her shyness

October 20, 2008

She was bitterly attacked by the New York Times this last week.  Now, maybe Cindy will speak…..

From
Politico

She speaks in such soft, gentle tones that people in the crowd sometimes find it hard to hear her, even with a microphone. And when her husband takes the stage, she melds into the background, her hands clasped, her blue eyes focused on him, on the sea of faces and, most intensely, on the message.

Cindy McCain, wife of Republican presidential candidate Sen. ... 
Cindy McCain, wife of Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., is seen during a campaign stop in Philadelphia, Monday, Oct. 20, 2008.(AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

So when Cindy McCain pounces to the attack and rips into Democrat Barack Obama and his wife, Michelle, it often catches the audience off guard, as happened on Friday at a rally of 6,000 supporters in Miami.

“I have always been proud of my country,” she said with righteous anger, drawing roars of approval for the unmistakable jab at Michelle Obama’s, who earlier this year said that “For the first time in my adult life, I am proud of my country because it feels like hope is finally…

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/politico/20081020/pl_politico/14748

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John McCain Not Happy With New York Times
News.com (Australia)

JOHN McCain’s presidential campaign blasted the New York Times today for an “unprecedented attack” on his wife, as both Republican and Democratic teams exchanged barbs over voter fraud allegations ahead of the November 4 election.

The paper’s profile of Cindy McCain delves into the background of the millionaire beer heiress, married to the Republican Arizona senator for more than 30 years.

McCain’s campaign fired back immediately, describing the profile as “gutter journalism at its worst” and a “barrage of petty and personal attacks”.

The article noted the candidate’s spouse had a role in the Keating Five savings-and-loan scandal, she “endured several miscarriages alone” while her husband worked in Washington, and she was “caught stealing drugs from her nonprofit organisation to feed her addiction to painkillers”.

The article is a “black mark on the record of a paper that was once widely respected, but is now little more than a propaganda organ for the Democratic party,” McCain’s campaign said.

“The New York Times has stooped lower than this campaign ever imagined possible in an attempt to discredit a woman whose only apparent sin is being married to the man that would oppose that paper’s preferred candidate, (Democrat) Barack Obama.”

Cindy McCain, 54, is the chairwoman of Hensley & Company, Arizona’s foremost beer distribution company worth an estimated tens of millions of dollars.

In a confession to Newsweek magazine she admitted drug use in the wake of the Keating scandal that rocked Washington in the late 1980s, in which she was the sole Senate spouse to be implicated.

“The pills made me feel euphoric and free,” she wrote in an essay.

Cindy McCain has been drafted into her husband’s campaign in recent weeks and was due to tour Pennsylvania by bus this weekend in a bid to stem McCain’s slide in the polls against his Democratic rival.

Read the rest:
http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,24518842-
38198,00.html?from=public_rss

Michelle Obama Takes Heat for Saying She’s ‘Proud of My Country’ for the First Time

February 19, 2008

Provided by Fox News
February 19, 2008

Barack Obama’s wife, Michelle, is under fire for leaving the impression that she hasn’t been proud of her country until now, when Democrats are beginning to rally around her husband’s campaign.

Speaking in Milwaukee, Wis., on Monday, she said, “People in this country are ready for change and hungry for a different kind of politics and … for the first time in my adult life I am proud of my country because it feels like hope is finally making a comeback.”

Greeted with rousing applause after making the comment in Milwaukee, Obama delivered an amended version of the speech later that day in Madison, Wis.

“For the first time in my adult lifetime, I’m really proud of my country … not just because Barack has done well, but because I think people are hungry for change,” she said. “I have been desperate to see our country moving in that direction and just not feeling so alone in my frustration and disappointment.”

Obama was born in 1964, meaning her adult life began in 1982. Critics quickly seized on the newfound national pride.

“I am proud of my country,”  John McCain’s wife, Cindy, said at a campaign stop in Brookfield, Wis., Tuesday. “I don’t know if you heard those words earlier … but I am very proud of my country.”

Peace and Freedom Thought:

Knowing that the Republican front runner was a former military man and POW alone should have forced Mrs. Obama to think through her remark a bit better.  This was a gigantic gaffe for a liberal who will now be branded, and maybe appropriately, by many as un-American.

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Inside Politics

By Greg Pierce
The Washington Times
February 20, 2008

‘Reallygate’
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Comments uttered by Barack Obama’s wife, Michelle, in Wisconsin on Monday have led some conservative bloggers and pundits to question her patriotism. The Obama campaign said her remarks were misinterpreted.
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During a rally in the Milwaukee, Mrs. Obama said that “for the first time in my adult lifetime, I am proud of my country, because it feels like home is finally making a comeback.”
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Later in the day, during a rally in Madison, Mrs. Obama altered the phrase’s meaning by adding the word “really” — “for the first time in my adult lifetime, I’m really proud of my country.”
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A spokeswoman for Mrs. Obama said any assumption that Mrs. Obama hasn’t always been proud to be an American is false.
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“In the context of her remarks, her point is clear — of course Michelle is proud of her country,” Katie McCormick Lelyveld told reporter Sean Lengell of The Washington Times.
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“What she meant is that she’s really proud at this moment because for the first time in a long time, thousands of Americans who’ve never participated in politics before are coming out in record numbers to build a grass-roots movement for change.”
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Political strategists and pollsters contacted yesterday said the incident will have little or no negative impact on the Obama campaign.
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David Winston
, a Republican strategist and pollster, said because Mrs. Obama had made no controversial statements previously, voters will pay little attention to her comment.

“Once is an incident; twice is a pattern,” Mr. Winston said.

Bud Jackson, a Democratic media consultant, said only political foes of Mr. Obama will infer that his wife is not a proud American.

“They are going to agree with the spirit of what she is saying that they are especially proud that the country appears more engaged than ever and ready for a change,” Mr. Winston said.

‘Very revealing’

Michelle Obama [on Monday] said that ‘for the first time in my adult lifetime, I am really proud of my country. And not just because Barack has done well, but because I think people are hungry for change. I have been desperate to see our country moving in that direction,’ ” John Podhoretz notes in a blog at www. commentarymagazine.com.

“Really proud of her country for the first time? Michelle Obama is 44 years old. She has been an adult since 1982. Can it really be there has not been a moment during that time when she felt proud of her country?” Mr. Podhoretz asked.

“Forget matters like the victory in the Cold War; how about only things that have made liberals proud — all the accomplishments of inclusion? How about the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1991? Or Ruth Bader Ginsburg‘s elevation to the Supreme Court? Or Carol Moseley Braun‘s election to the Senate in 1998? How about the merely humanitarian, like this country’s startling generosity to the victims of the tsunami? I’m sure commenters can think of hundreds more landmarks of this sort. Didn’t she even get a twinge from, say, the Olympics?

“Mrs. Obama was speaking at a campaign rally, so it is easy to assume she was merely indulging in hyperbole. Even so, it is very revealing.

“It suggests, first, that the pseudo-messianic nature of the Obama candidacy is very much a part of the way the Obamas themselves are feeling about it these days. If they don’t get a hold of themselves, the family vanity is going to swell up to the size of Phileas Fogg’s hot-air balloon and send the two of them soaring to heights of self-congratulatory solipsism that we’ve never seen before.

“Second, it suggests the Obama campaign really does have its roots in New Class leftism, according to which patriotism is not only the last refuge of a scoundrel, but the first refuge as well — that America is not fundamentally good but flawed, but rather fundamentally flawed and only occasionally good. There’s something for John McCain to work with here.”