Archive for the ‘Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao’ Category

China’s Premier: Rich nations should ditch ‘unsustainable’ lifestyles

November 7, 2008

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao and a top UN official urged industrialised nations Friday to alter their lifestyles and not let the global financial crisis hamper climate change efforts.


Above: Wen Jiabao

Industrialised nations should also help developing countries respond to climate change, Wen said at the opening of a two-day international meeting on global warming in Beijing.

“The developed countries have a responsibility and an obligation to respond to global climate change by altering their unsustainable way of life,” the state news agency Xinhua quoted him as saying.

“As the global financial crisis spreads and worsens, and the world economy slows down, the international community must not waver in its determination to tackle climate change.”

AFP

The gathering in Beijing is focused on the development and transfer of technology that can help tackle climate change ahead of next month’s talks on creating a new global treaty on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Representatives from 76 nations are attending.

China proposed last week that rich nations devote one percent of their economic output to helping poor countries fight global warming.

Yvo de Boer, executive secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, said Friday a lack of firm funding commitments could derail efforts to cut emissions in developing countries, especially during the financial crisis.

“The financial crisis is definitely going to affect international climate change policy,” he said.

But “the financial crisis offers the world an opportunity to move away from toxic investments and make sustainable investments, for example into low emissions energy infrastructure,” he said.

In the landmark Kyoto Protocol, rich nations agreed to targets for cutting greenhouse gases as well as helping to transfer clean technology to developing nations to help them reduce their emissions.

But much of the pledged transfers are not happening, said de Boer.

“Industrial countries must meet their technology transfer obligations,” he told journalists.

“Given their historical responsibility for the problem, it is essential that industrialised countries take the lead in reducing emissions and that they show real leadership (in climate change negotiations).”

Formal negotiations on a new treaty to replace the Kyoto Protocol when it expires in 2012 will begin in Poznan, Poland next month, with the UN hoping that a new agreement will be ready by the end of 2009, de Boer said.

“Governments have used 2008 to gather information and clarify their positions on a number of topics. At Poznan governments need to go into full negotiation mode and make concrete results,” he said.

China has long resisted calls to join rich nations in setting targets for emissions cuts, saying its relatively low per capita emissions and recent emergence as a major source of greenhouse gases should exempt it from action.

Scientists said in September that China had leapfrogged the United States as the world’s biggest producer of carbon dioxide (CO2), one of the principal gases that cause global warming.

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Problems creep out past official front in China

March 20, 2008
BEIJING — Last month, Olympic organizers were showing off a new basketball arena and denied that any residents were forcibly evicted to build the many sites for the Summer Games. But the Olympic Media Village sits where Li Yukui and his neighbors had to leave their homes.

Olympic officials promised to clean Beijing’s severe air pollution, but an Ethiopian runner said last week that he won’t run the marathon because breathing the air could harm his health.

And the neighborhood volunteers touted for learning English to give directions to visitors instead spend their time monitoring residents and even confronted one pregnant woman about whether she was violating China’s one-child policy.

Five months before the Olympics, China is discovering the difficult line between promotion of its many successes and concealment of deep problems that dog the communist nation.

China’s crackdown on pro-independence protests in Tibet is just one front of this struggle. The world’s most populous nation wants to present a united image of harmony and prosperity. But the ruling Communist Party, which bristles at outside criticism, sometimes contains dissidents and ignores human rights complaints.

Riot police take a rest on a street in Tongren, in China's Qinghai ...
Riot police take a rest on a street in Tongren, in China’s Qinghai province, March 17, 2008.(Kyodo/Reuters)

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http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2008-03-19-chinaimage_N.htm?csp=34

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao Denounces Supporters of the Dalai Lama

March 18, 2008
By AUDRA ANG, Associated Press Writer 

BEIJING – Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao denounced supporters of the Dalai Lama as separatists and instigators of violent anti-Chinese riots in Tibet’s capital, taking a hard stance Tuesday as a deadline for protesters to turn themselves in passed without apparent surrenders.

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao speaks to reporters at a press conference ...
Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao speaks to reporters at a press conference after the closing ceremony of the National People’s Congress in Beijing’s Great Hall of the People Tuesday, March 18, 2007. The annual session of China’s ceremonial parliament was drawing to a close Tuesday, overshadowed by deadly anti-government protests in Tibet.
(AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Wen’s remarks were the highest-level response to last week’s rampage in Lhasa, which the government has said killed 16 people and injured dozens.

“There is ample fact — and we also have plenty of evidence — proving that this incident was organized, premeditated, masterminded and incited by the Dalai clique,” Wen told reporters at a news conference held at the end of China‘s national legislative meeting but did not give any details.

“This has all the more revealed that the consistent claims made by the Dalai clique that they pursue not independence but peaceful dialogue are nothing but lies,” he said. “Their hypocritical lies cannot cover the unclad facts.”

He also dismissed claims by the exiled Dalai Lama that there was “cultural genocide” taking place in his homeland.

The hardline stance taken by the normally mild-manner Wen underscored the communist leadership’s determination to regain control over the region and ensure a smooth run up to this summer’s Beijing Olympics.

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http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080318/ap_on_re_as/
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