Archive for the ‘candy’ Category

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration will open three offices in China this week

November 17, 2008

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration will open three offices in China this week in an unprecedented effort to improve the safety of exports headed to America amid recurring product safety scares.

The new FDA offices, which are the first outside of the United States, will increase effectiveness in protecting for American and Chinese consumers, according to the office of U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Mike Leavitt.

Leavitt and the agency’s Food and Drug Commissioner Andrew von Eschenbach will open the first office in Beijing on Wednesday, followed by one in Guangzhou and another in Shanghai.

Associated Press

“Establishing a permanent FDA presence in China will greatly enhance the speed and effectiveness of our regulatory cooperation and our efforts to protect consumers in both countries,” Leavitt’s office said in a statement last week.

Safety issues involving the blood thinner heparin, food and other products imported from China has put pressure on the FDA to boost its international presence. In the heparin case, a Chinese-made component contained a contaminant linked to as many as 81 deaths and hundreds of allergic reactions.

In October, cribs made in China were included in a recall of 1.6 million cribs issued by New York-based Delta Enterprises.

Last year, U.S.-based Mattel Inc. recalled more than 21 million Chinese-made toys worldwide. Products including Barbie doll accessories and toy cars were pulled off shelves because of concerns about lead paint or tiny, detachable magnets that might be swallowed.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081117/ap_on_
bi_ge/as_china_us_tainted_products_8

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China official says tainted eggs “isolated” case

November 3, 2008

Before you read what China’s communist government says about poison in China’s products, consider this: the poison melamine has been found in Chinese made (and exported) products including toothpaste, cough syrup, eggs, milk, meat, chicken, biscuits, candy and a host of other products for about two years.  We believe, therefore, the claims by the esteemed member of the communist government seem completely without merit….as usual….But you decide for yourself.  If you “swallow” what communist China says, whatever you do, don’t swallow anything else made from within China….
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China’s agriculture minister has called the discovery of melamine-tainted eggs “isolated cases,” but urged continued scrutiny over the animal feed industry to ensure food safety.

In remarks posted on the ministry Web site late Sunday, Minister Sun Zhengcai said that “very few batches of eggs from very few companies” contained the chemical melamine.

Calling them “isolated cases,” he nevertheless said the Agriculture Ministry’s departments “should pay high attention” to the feed quality to ensure the safety of eggs and other animal products, and protect farmers’ interests.

A vendor waits for customers at her stall as she sells eggs ... 
A vendor waits for customers at her stall as she sells eggs at a market in Xiangfan, Hubei province November 3, 2007. Chinese eggs tainted with an industrial chemical were an isolated case, the Agriculture Minister was quoted saying the day after officials were ordered to crack the “dark” networks selling contaminated animal feed.REUTERS/Stringer (CHINA) CHINA OUT

Sun made the remarks during a trip to a farm in Dingxing county in northern Hebei Sunday.

Last week, four brands of Chinese eggs were found to be contaminated with melamine, and agriculture officials speculated that the cause was adulterated feed given to hens. No illnesses have been linked to melamine in eggs.

Other ministry officials have asserted that the practice of deliberately adding melamine to animal feed was widely practiced, signaling that melamine contamination may be more widespread than in just baby formula and dairy products.

Inspectors have destroyed 3,682 tons of animal feed that was tainted with the chemical. Commonly used in plastics and fertilizers, melamine is high in nitrogen, which registers as high protein levels in routine tests of food and feed.

Infant formula tainted with the chemical has been blamed for sickening tens of thousands of children and causing the deaths of four infants.

Though experts say at low levels it does not pose a risk to human health, higher concentrations of melamine harm the kidneys.

A child suffering from kidney stones receives medical treatment ...
A child suffering from kidney stones receives medical treatment at a hospital in Hefei, Anhui province in this September 19, 2008 file photo. The discovery of melamine in eggs as well as in baby formula, milk products, biscuits, chocolates and other foodstuffs containing milk derivatives confirms what experts have long suspected; that the chemical is deeply embedded in the human food chain. China is a major transgressor as carcinogenic chemicals are regularly used as food colouring agents or as preservatives, experts say. To match feature CHINA-MELAMINE/FOODCHAIN REUTERS/Stringer/Files (CHINA).

Over the weekend, Agriculture Ministry official Wang Zhicai said that inspection teams have descended on feed makers nationwide in a “punishment” campaign to ferret out those found using excessive amounts of the chemical melamine.

Among the 250,000 feed-makers and animal breeding farms inspected, inspectors found more than 500 engaged in illegal or questionable practices, with police further investigating 27 companies, Wang said. He likened the behavior of some of the companies to organized crime, calling them “black nests of gangsters.”

China has struggled to appear responsive to a widening food scandal. In the nearly two months since the government first acknowledged that melamine contaminated the milk supply, the chemical has been detected in eggs, candy and other products. Its presence in feed raises fears about the safety of meat and fish.

A little more than a year ago, China vowed to minimize the use of melamine after it was found in pet food exports that killed dogs and cats in North America in 2007.
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China Says It Will Tighten Control of Feed Industry; After Years of Evidence of Poisoned Animal Feed

November 1, 2008

China has pledged to tighten supervision of the animal feed industry, state media said Saturday, amid signs a toxic chemical found in milk and eggs was being mixed into livestock feed.

“The ministry will tighten its supervision of the feed industry and crack down on producers who add melamine to their products,” the China Daily quoted Wang Zhicai, head of the Agriculture Ministry’s livestock division as saying.

From AFP

Melamine, an industrial chemical normally used to make plastic, was first found to have been added to milk in China, leading to the death of four infants and sickening at least 53,000 other people.

The chemical — which can lead to severe kidney problems if ingested in large amounts — was then discovered in Chinese eggs, leading to concerns the chemical was much more prevalent in China’s food chain than initially believed.

A market in Xiamen. China has pledged to tighten supervision ... 
A market in Xiamen. China has pledged to tighten supervision of the animal feed industry, state media said Saturday, amid signs a toxic chemical found in milk and eggs was being mixed into livestock feed(AFP/File/Mark Ralston)

Wang acknowledged that the ministry issued a regulation in June last year banning the addition of melamine into livestock feed, according to a transcript of the interview on its website.

“Anyone who adds melamine into feed is acting against the law, we must resolutely combat this,” Wang said.

The ministry also introduced a “rigid” standard to test the level of melamine in feed, Wang said, following a scandal over contaminated feed exported to the United States that killed hundreds of pets there.

Despite this, experts have indicated melamine could still be being mixed into animal feed to make it appear higher in protein, and concerns are mounting that the practice is widespread.

In an editorial published on Friday, the China Daily said it was unclear whether melamine had found its way into other types of food.

Read vthe rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081101/wl_asia_afp/
chinafoodsafety_081101060657

Poison in Feed Not A New Problem in China
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China’s communist state media is trying to paint the poisoned animal feed problem as a dilemma just uncovered within the last 60-90 days.   Sadly, some respected Westen media including the BBC have swallowed and spread this line of lies.

 

I saw the improper mixing and use of animal feed in China years ago.  Chinese farmers were just trying to lessen the cost of feeding chickens and cattle.  And agricultural suppliers of all kinds in China work feverishly to sell “cheeper, better” feeds, insecticides and fertilizers.

Beijing’s government has little or no control over the millions of small manufacturers and farmers in the vast countryside of this rural nation of 1.3 billion people.  Until this last summer’s Olympics, Beijing had never even had food sanitation and safety standards written much less enforced for restaurants — a very basic of health taken for granted in the West.

On October 31, 2008, the BBC reported that the poison melamine was widely used in many food products in China and that “the melamine scandal began early in September.” 

Apparently the BBC took no note of the New York Times report a year ago last April (2007) that melamine was widely used in food products in China — and probably had been for years.  The Times called the use a melamine an “open secret” in China.
Here’s the report on melamine in China’s food supply from The New York Times from April 2007:
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ZHANGQIU, China, April 28, 2007 — As American food safety regulators head to China to investigate how a chemical made from coal found its way into pet food that killed dogs and cats in the United States, workers in this heavily polluted northern city openly admit that the substance is routinely added to animal feed as a fake protein.
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For years, producers of animal feed all over China have secretly supplemented their feed with the substance, called melamine, a cheap additive that looks like protein in tests, even though it does not provide any nutritional benefits, according to melamine scrap traders and agricultural workers here.

“Many companies buy melamine scrap to make animal feed, such as fish feed,” said Ji Denghui, general manager of the Fujian Sanming Dinghui Chemical Company, which sells melamine. “I don’t know if there’s a regulation on it. Probably not. No law or regulation says ‘don’t do it,’ so everyone’s doing it. The laws in China are like that, aren’t they? If there’s no accident, there won’t be any regulation.”

Melamine is at the center of a recall of 60 million packages of pet food, after the chemical was found in wheat gluten linked this month to the deaths of at least 16 pets in the United States.

No one knows exactly how melamine (which is not believed to be particularly toxic) became so fatal in pet food, but its presence in any form of American food is illegal.

The link to China has set off concerns among critics of the Food and Drug Administration that ingredients in pet food as well as human food, which are increasingly coming from abroad, are not being adequately screened.

Above: Ariana Lindquist for The New York Times

“They have fewer people inspecting product at the ports than ever before,” says Caroline Smith DeWaal, the director of food safety for the Center for Science in the Public Interest in Washington. “Until China gets programs in place to verify the safety of their products, they need to be inspected by U.S. inspectors. This open-door policy on food ingredients is an open invitation for an attack on the food supply, either intentional or unintentional.”

Now, with evidence mounting that the tainted wheat gluten came from China, American regulators have been granted permission to visit the region to conduct inspections of food treatment facilities.

The Food and Drug Administration has already banned imports of wheat gluten from China after it received more than 14,000 reports of pets believed to have been sickened by packaged food. And last week, the agency opened a criminal investigation in the case and searched the offices of at least one pet food supplier.

The Department of Agriculture has also stepped in. On Thursday, the agency ordered more than 6,000 hogs to be quarantined or slaughtered after some of the pet food ingredients laced with melamine were accidentally sent to hog farms in eight states, including California.

Read the rest
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/30/business/worldbusiness/30food.html?ex=1335672000&en=b143bd4a5d0684b6&ei=5124&partner=permalink&exprod=permalink

They must not have the Internet in London because I found the New York Times report on melamine in China’s food supply on the Internet from April 2007 in just seconds.

My Vietnamese-born wife, who has been a guest of the communist prison and torture system said, “When you want to do business with communist China’s news media, you publish what they tell you or else.”

The BBC should be ashamed.

China Widens Food Tests on Signs of New Contamination, Poison

October 31, 2008

Chinese regulators said Friday that they were widening their investigation into contaminated food amid growing signs that an industrial chemical called melamine had leached into the nation’s animal feed supplies, posing even deeper health risks to consumers after the recent tainted milk scandal.

By David Barboza
The New York Times
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The announcement came after food safety tests earlier this week found that eggs produced in three different provinces in China were contaminated with melamine, a chemical that is blamed for causing kidney stones and renal failure in infants. The tests have led to recalls of eggs and consumer warnings.

The reports are another serious blow to China’s agriculture industry, which is already struggling to cope with its worst food safety scandal in decades after melamine tainted milk supplies sickened over 50,000 children, caused at least four deaths and led to global recalls of goods produced with Chinese dairy products earlier this fall.

 
Above: A worker placed a notice that read “No melamine contained” on egg crates at a major eggs production factory in suburban Beijing on Friday. Photo by Andy Wong, Associated Press.

The cases are fueling global concerns about contaminated Chinese food. In Hong Kong, food safety officials announced this week that they would be testing a wider variety of foods for melamine, including vegetables, flour and meat products.

But food safety experts have also asked consumers to remain calm because while melamine-tainted milk has hospitalized thousands in China, there are no known cases thus far of consumers becoming seriously ill from eating melamine-tainted eggs.

Hong Kong officials said melamine was found in higher than permissible levels in eggs imported from China, but that a child would have to eat about two dozen eggs in a single day to become ill.

Still, if eggs, milk and animal feed supplies are tainted, there is the specter of an even wider array of foods that could come under scrutiny for contamination, everything from pork and chicken supplies to bread, biscuits, eggs, cakes and seafood.

While China is not a major exporter of dairy products, it has one of the world’s fastest-growing dairy industries and it is also one of the world’s largest exporters of food and food ingredients, including meats, seafood, beverages and vitamins.

Read the rest:
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/01/world/asia/
01china.html?_r=1&hp&oref=slogin

Panama Has “The Gift That Keeps On Giving”: Poisoned Candy From China

October 17, 2008

PANAMA CITY, Panama – Panama says Chinese cookies and candy pulled from stores have tested positive for melamine, the industrial chemical blamed for the deaths of four infants and the sickening of 54,000 children in China.

Food Safety director Gilberto Real says traces of the chemical were found in milk-based White Rabbit caramels, orange and strawberry sandwich cookies and milk bars.

Melamine is used to make plastics and fertilizers. It can cause kidney stones and in extreme cases can lead to death.

Panama pulled 56 Chinese products from stores last month. Real said Friday that 28 tested negative and 24 are still being examined.

Dozens of Panamanians died last year after taking tainted, Chinese-made medicine. [cough syrup]

–From Yahoo news and wire services
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China’s White Rabbit Candy: Poison Inc.

SHANGHAI (AFP) – Flanked by smiling bunny statues and waving official safety reports, White Rabbit‘s boss declared China‘s most famous candy was back on sale after a brief recall for containing tainted milk.

Weng Mao, president of candy maker Guan Sheng Yuan, officially began the fight to rehabilitate the White Rabbit brand in front of reporters and shoppers in a big department store on Shanghai‘s main pedestrian shopping street.

“A healthy White Rabbit is jumping back into a big market,” read a banner over Weng’s head as he announced Thursday the sweets were returning to mainland shelves three weeks after sales in China and 50 other countries were halted.

A White Rabbit candy promotion in Shanghai. Flanked by smiling ... 
A White Rabbit candy promotion in Shanghai. Flanked by smiling bunny statues and waving official safety reports, White Rabbit’s boss declared China’s most famous candy was back on sale after a brief recall for containing tainted milk(AFP/Str)

The creamy milk-flavoured candy was first produced in Shanghai in 1943 and, with its edible rice paper wrapper, has become one of the nation’s most recognisable and enduring global brands.

But sales of White Rabbit stopped on September 26 after they were found to contain melamine — an industrial chemical that was illegally added to Chinese milk to make its protein content seem higher.

Four Chinese babies died of kidney failure and more than 53,000 fell ill this year after consuming tainted dairy products.

After the scandal emerged in early September, it quickly went global with countries around the world detecting melamine in a wide range of Chinese-made dairy products and subsequently banning them.

Singapore’s health authorities first raised the alarm over White Rabbit last month, warning that the sweets contained the highest melamine levels out of a range of Chinese products tested.

Stores in the United States, Britain, Canada and New Zealand also soon pulled White Rabbit off their shelves, and the Chinese company was forced to halt exports to 50 overseas markets, as well as to suspend domestic sales.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081017/wl_asia_afp/
chinafoodsafetychildwhiterabbit_081017071649

France Pulls Poisoned Chinese Food Products; Dairy Sued in China

October 13, 2008

BBC

France has recalled sweets and biscuits made with Chinese dairy products after finding high levels of a chemical.

In China, four babies have died and 53,000 have fallen sick after consuming milk products contaminated with the industrial chemical melamine.

The EU banned imports of Chinese baby food containing traces of milk in response to the scare last month.

The recall of White Rabbit sweets and Koala biscuits is the first such order to be made by a European country.

French consumers were warned to destroy or return the tainted products after tests showed high levels of melamine, which can cause kidney failure.

“The first results of tests conducted in France have shown a melamine level above the warning level set by the European Commission at 2.5mg per kilo,” the agriculture ministry said in a statement.

So far there have been no identified cases of health problems associated with the contamination in France.

The recall is the strongest measure yet taken by a European country amid a worldwide health scare over Chinese milk products that has led several countries to ban dairy imports from China.

It came as China issued new quality controls for its dairy industry and promised more severe punishment, including public naming, for anyone found to have violated safety standards.

Some Chinese dairy farmers are accused of fraudulently adding melamine to watered-down milk to make the product appear rich in protein and to fool quality control tests.
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Chinese Dairy Sued over Poisoned Milk Death

By CHRISTOPHER BODEEN, Associated Press Writer 

BEIJING – The family of a baby whose death has been blamed on toxic milk filed suit against one of China’s largest dairies Monday, while another dairy ensnared in the scandal said it was a victim of unscrupulous subcontractors.

The lawsuit against Shijiazhuang Sanlu Group Co. was filed over the May 1 death of 6-month-old Yi Kaixuan in the northwestern city of Lanzhou, the family’s lawyer said.

In this July 3, 2007, file photo, a worker selects the daily ... 
In this July 3, 2007, file photo, a worker selects the daily product at the production line at Wahaha’s factory in Hangzhou, China. Chinese beverage maker Wahaha Group is considering buying dairy assets from Sanlu Group, the milk maker at the heart of a scandal over milk tainted with an industrial chemical, reports said Monday October 13, 2008. Wahaha spokesman Shan Qining said he could not confirm the reports citing the company’s chairman, Zong Qinghou, as saying he wants to buy a milk powder production line from Sanlu.(AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, FILE)

It is the first to be filed over a child who died from drinking the tainted milk and asks for almost $160,000 in damages.

Milk collection stations and individual farmers are accused of watering down milk to increase volume, then adding the industrial chemical melamine to increase protein levels. Melamine, used mainly in plastics and fertilizer, is high in nitrogen and can make milk appear to contain more protein, which is what quality tests measure.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081013/ap_on_re_as/as_china_tainted_milk_4

China’s White Rabbit Candy Withdrawn on Mainland In Poisoned Milk Scandal

September 26, 2008

By Nerys Avery

Sept. 26 (Bloomberg) — The maker of China’s best-known milk candy brand White Rabbit has halted sales across the nation as Shanghai food inspectors test the sweets for melamine contamination, the official Xinhua news agency reported.

The candy has already been pulled off shelves in Singapore, Hong Kong and the UK after tests showed some batches contained melamine. Tesco Plc, the UK’s biggest supermarket chain, said on Sept. 24 it withdrew White Rabbit from some of its British stores as a “precautionary measure.”

The suspension of sales in China reflects “the company’s conscientious decision to protect consumers,” Ge Junjie, vice manager of Shanghai Guangming (Bright) Dairy and Food Co., was quoted as saying in Xinhua’s English-language report. Shanghai Guangming owns Guanshengyuan (Group) Co. which makes the candy.

Read the rest:
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/ne
ws?pid=20601089&sid=a0ce3XoyOvbM

China’s “Drug Abuse” Problem: Below Standard Pharmaceuticals Have Been Deadly

July 8, 2007

(See the very learned comment at the end of this text)

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
July 8, 2007

China announced today that is had halted sales of Chinese-made methotrexate, a key drug in fighting leukemia. Xinhua news agency reported that children injected with the drug sometimes felt so much pain that they were unable to walk.

In reporting that sales of methotrexate had been suspended, China’s regulators of drugs and pharmaceuticals reiterated that over the course of the last year, the manufacturer of a drug responsible for at least 11 deaths had been put out of business and four other companies were permanently suspended from doing business. At least 128 companies had their Good Manufacturing Practice certificates revoked, but they can apply for re-inspection and resume drug production if they meet national standard.

In Panama, 83 people died last year after taking medicines contaminated with a Chinese-made toxin according to a senior Panama prosecutor who spoke to us on Thursday.

China’s quality-control systems coving nearly all products from soy sauce to heart medication has been seriously called into question if not destroyed in the near-term. At first, investigators thought the unsafe and poorly made products were all shipped overseas. Now it is clear that China’s domestic products are tainted as well.

All this as China’s senior government official for drug registrations received a suspended death sentence on Friday last week for taking bribes to approve medications, some of which did not meet standards.

A Beijing court said Cao Wenzhuang was guilty of accepting 2.4 million yuan (315,000 dollars) while heading up the drug registration division of the state food and drug administration.  In China, suspended death sentences are often commuted to life in prison.

Over the course of the last four years, there have been several indications of problems in food and drug manufacturing and testing.  But this became a crisis earlier this year when investigators in the United States began to look into a large number of dogas and cats falling ill and many dying.

The pet illness epidenic was traced to Chinese-made pet food laced with a fertilizer component named melamine. Companies in China had illegally added melamine to wheat gluten and rice protein in a bid to meet the contractual demand for the amount of protein in the pet food products.

The melamine is much cheeper than meat.  So Chinese manufacturers were able to cut manufacturing costs while still charging top dollar for their products.

Subsequently the U.S. Food and Drug Administration began testing all foods and products with the potential for oral ingestion like toothpaste.  Now all seafood from China is banned from sale in the U.S. and many products such as toothpaste, if proven manufactured from China, have to be removed from shelves and returned to the point of entry or destroyed.

The cutting of corners and use of substandard or dangerous ingredients seems to have been across the board in China.  Even children’s candy and other treats have been found to be contaminated.

More as it becomes available…..
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WE GOT SEVERAL E-MAIL ON THIS ESSAY! HERE IS THE ONE MOST INCLUSIVE:Re: China’s “Drug Abuse” Problem: Below Standard Pharmaceuticals Have Been DeadlyAn interesting article, John, but one where you have it completely back to front.  The problem is in the United States and, more generally, the West; not here in China.

Chinese people are notoriously suspicious of products and brands and have been for a very long time. 

“Downgauging” or corner cutting to reduce product costs is very common and everyone knows it, except apparently uninformed American industrialists who naively rush to China themselves to reduce costs, with no regard to the consequences – all entirly foreseeable.

Clearly, faulty manufacture here will result in litigation in the US, but no possibility of claims against Chinese counter-parties.  They don’t care.  They just want to make money.  Further, the legal system here could not be more different.

The American Chamber of Commerce is part of the problem too in their opposition to Chinese wage increases here and keeping wages and costs unreasonably low.

Don’t expect things to get any better any time soon.  The demand on factories here is too great on factories.

Of course, outsourcing has always been a high risk strategy.  There is no substitute for owning your own factories.  Nor, as far as I can tell, can Americans take criticism.  The problem must lie with “the other”.

Taking investment to Vietnam won’t change a thing, unless the approach changes.

Have a happy day …

Regards … Name withheld – ShangHai
Good links to try:
to Diary of the Mad Pigeon, third world county, Faultline USA, Stageleft, Big Dog’s Weblog, Walls of the City, The Pet Haven Blog, The Pink Flamingo, The Bullwinkle Blog, Conservative Cat, Adeline and Hazel, and The Yankee Sailor, thanks to Linkfest Haven Deluxe.

Best of all RIGHT TRUTH!
http://righttruth.typepad.com/right_truth/

China Planning a Surreal Facade for Summer Olympic Games: Beijing 2008

July 7, 2007

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
July 9, 2007

Few could have anticipated the run of bad publicity, crises and scandals that China has weathered since about last winter or spring.

First, pets in America became sick and many died. The illness was traced to Chinese-made pet food laced with a fertilizer component named melamine. Companies in China had illegally added melamine to wheat gluten and rice protein in a bid to meet the contractual demand for the amount of protein in the pet food products.

After that, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States began to take a harder look at a host of Chinese products imported into the U.S.

The FDA ended up barring most seafood from China (where we in the U.S. get about 1/3 of our shrimp, much of our catfish and other “farm raised” seafood products) because much of it contained drugs, bacteria or other suspicious or obviously harmful products.

Not only was imported seafood tainted, but the FDA began turning away tons of other food products – some of it contaminated, some filled with toxins and other products full of bacteria.

Products like toothpaste, chewing gum and even soy sauce were found to be made with toxic ingredients. Roughly 900,000 tubes of Chinese made toothpaste containing a poison used in some antifreeze products turned up in U.S. hospitals for the mentally ill, prisons, juvenile detention centers and even some hospitals serving the general population.

Then the Colgate-Palmolive Company announced that it had found counterfeit “Colgate” toothpaste containing the anti-freeze diethylene glycol, a syrupy poison.

Although tainted or poorly made and tested food from China was first noticed in the United States and other western nations, once China checked its own store shelves it found problems. 

Inspectors in southwest China’s Guangxi region found excessive additives and preservatives in nearly 40 percent of 100 children’s snacks sampled during the second quarter of 2007, according to a report on China’s central government Web site.

The snacks — including soft drinks, candied fruits, gelatin desserts and some types of crackers — were taken from 70 supermarkets, department stores and wholesale markets in seven cities in the region, it said.

Only 35 percent of gelatin desserts sampled met food standards, the report said, while two types of candied fruit contained 63 times the permitted amount of artificial sweetener.

And if substandard children’s snacks weren’t bad enough, China and the U.S. FDA uncovered a huge racket in substandard medicines. One manufacturer of medicines was implicated in 11 deaths.  Five manufactures lost the ability to continue in the business.  And 128 drug makers lost their Chinese government Good Manufacturing Practice certificates, a symbol of favorable performance, the China Daily newspaper reported on its Web site.

We also saw, thanks to an aroused international media, child laborers illegally producing Beijing Olympics 2008 memorabilia. Just when you thought it couldn’t get any worse for China, a slavery scandal erupted. Slaves were found mining materials and making bricks inside China.

The United Nations condemned China for the worst pollution in the world. China also produces more greenhouse gases than any other nation by far.

Despite China’s long history for managing its media and controlling what the world learned about the People’s Republic, stories surfaced and were verified that showed an illegal trade in “harvested” human organs from inside China. Unscrupulous doctors and businessmen teamed up to create a thriving business in human organs. The problem was that the organs came from prisoners and the mentally ill, who had no say in the matter and died before they could become witnesses to this atrocity.

Add to this a long and unresolved dispute about the way China controls its currency and a thriving business inside China in counterfeit goods: everything from U.S. music and motion pictures to Rolex watches, books and, well, you name it.

China tried to market a new Chinese made automobile to the upscale European buyer but the vehicle disintegrated in a 40 MPH crash test. Now Europeans wouldn’t be, well, caught dead in the thing.

So from May until July 2007, despite the Chinese News Spin Machine going full tilt the bad news about China seemed to be spinning out of control.

Just today, July 7, 2007, the Central Committee of the Communist Party seemed to be threatening local leaders who allow social unrest.  “Officials who perform poorly in maintaining social stability in rural areas will not be qualified for promotion,” Ouyang Song, a senior party official in charge of personnel matters said, according to China’s Official Communist News media.

All these problems don’t even trump China’s most horrible foreign policy disaster: Suport for Sudan without taking action on Darfur.  The U.N. and others have referred to Sudan’s conduct in Darfur as genocide.  And Hollywood big shots are already calling next summer’s Olympics in Beijing the “genocide games.” 

Not to worry, though. China’s communist leadership still plans a masterful and error free Beijing Olympics 2008.

The communist government of China is taking action to streamline what the western media sees next summer. Smokey, coal-fired factories are even being moved out of Beijing and into the countryside because their effluent looks so disgusting there was fear these factories alone could cause a major embarrassment.

Beijing’s population had a practice “No Spiting Day” in an effort to reduce this disgusting habit common in the city. The test was a disastrous failure and a new training approach is planned. Beijing also had a day devoted to polite lining up for buses and trains. This worked out a little better with the obedient and terrified city workers not taking any chances.

During the Olympics, communist leaders in Beijing plan to remove from the city the hordes of vagrants, homeless people and orphaned children who live on Beijing’s streets. Some estimate that as many as 2 million orphaned or homeless children live in Beijing alone.

In order to assess what can be done about Beijing’s choked streets overwhelmed by traffic; and to see if a dent can be made in the choking air pollution, one million Beijing automobile drivers will have to stay at home or use mass transit on a day scheduled to test the impact of all of this. Beijing only has 3 million registered automobiles so inconveniencing one-third of them for one day should hardly impact the economy, right? But if the test is a success, one would have to remind China that the Olympics is not a one day event.

When all this is assessed together, one might ask, when we get to Beijing next summer for the Olympic Games, how much of what we see will be real? And how much is a product of the smoke and mirrors China often employs to produce the desired result.

Related:

Pollution Dangers Cast Shadow over 2008 Olympics

Chinese Government Staff: “Happy News President Hu Jintao; We Ready For Happy Time Olympics!”

Some National Cultures More Tolerant of Death?

Tricky Vietnamese Truth About Catfish
The Chinese are just as smart as the Vietnamese on how to work the American system….

China says food safety scares threaten stability

China’s “Drug Abuse” Problem: Below Standard Pharmaceuticals Have Been Deadly

China may need a fresh approach to regulating its often unruly economy

China tells local authorities to address social instability

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From John Carey: A friend sent us this:

Friend:

I was in a Beijing hotel last year… A very upscale American style one near the Olympic area.Inside the hotel, it seemed identical to any nice hotel you’d see in New York, Dallas or LA… except for the big sign next to the faucet in the bathroom.

From John Carey: I had the same experience in Moscow.  Superior 4-star hotel  Water out of the tap was brown.