Archive for the ‘candidate’ Category

Candidate Obama Made Fun of Hillary’s Foreign Policy Experience; President-Elect Plans To Hire Her

November 29, 2008

It wasn’t too long ago that Barack Obama and his advisers were tripping over one another to tear down Hillary Rodham Clinton’s foreign policy credentials. She was dismissed as a commander in chief wanna-be who did little more than sip tea and make small talk with foreign leaders during her days as first lady.

“What exactly is this foreign policy experience?” Obama said mockingly of the New York senator. “Was she negotiating treaties? Was she handling crises? The answer is no.”
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By Nancy Benac, Associated Press
In this Feb. 26, 2008 file photo, then Democratic presidential ...

In this Feb. 26, 2008 file photo, then Democratic presidential hopefuls Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., left, and Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., respond to a question during a Democratic presidential debate in Cleveland. It wasn’t too long ago that Obama and his advisers were tripping over one another to tear down Clinton’s foreign policy credentials. She was dismissed as a commander-in-chief wanna-be who did little more than sip tea and make small talk with foreign leaders during her days as first lady. Now, Clinton is on track to become Obama’s secretary of state.(AP Photo/Mark Duncan, File)
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That was in March, when Clinton was Obama’s sole remaining rival for the Democratic presidential nomination.
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Now, Clinton is on track to become Obama’s secretary of state.
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And, unsurprisingly, the sniping at her foreign policy credentials is a thing of the past.
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Obama adviser William Daley over the weekend said Clinton would be “a tremendous addition to this administration. Tremendous.”
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Senior adviser David Axelrod called Clinton a “demonstrably able, tough, brilliant person.”

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http://news.aol.com/main/obama-presidency/article/obama-team-
reinvents-clinton-after-digs/262862

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Republican National Committee Chairman candidate Michael S. Steele Castigates Republican Party “Country Club” Mentality

November 19, 2008

Republican National Committee Chairman candidate Michael S. Steele castigated Republican Party leadership Tuesday for having a “country club” mentality and being out of touch, and said if he is chosen to represent the party, he will help transform it into an inspiring choice for young and minority voters.

 
 Michael S. Steele

“Let’s just be very frank about it. What the party’s got to do is get its head out of the clouds and out of the sand and recognize that the dynamics politically and otherwise around them have changed,” said Mr. Steele, during an interview with reporters and editors at The Washington Times.

“The coalitions are very different from what they were 25 years ago,” he said.

By Jon Ward
The washington Times

Mr. Steele, 50, who in 2002 became the first black lieutenant governor of Maryland, talked at length about how the Republican Party can recover from an election in which Democratic President-elect Barack Obama won traditionally conservative states, such as Virginia and Indiana, largely because he drew huge numbers of first-time voters to the polls.

Mr. Steele blasted the Republican Party’s lackluster effort in recruiting those same new voters, especially minorities.

“The problem is that within the operations of the RNC, they don’t give a damn. It’s all about outreach and outreach means lets throw a cocktail party, find some black folks and Hispanics and women, wrap our arms around them ‘See, look at us,'” he said.

“And then we go back to same ole’, same ole’. Theres nothing that is driven down to the state party level, where state chairmen across the country, to the extent they dont appreciate it, are helped to appreciate the importance of African-Americans and women and others coming and being a part of this party, and to the extent that they do appreciate it, are given support and back up to generate their own programs to create this relationship.”

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http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2008/nov/18/steele-
criticizes-country-club-gop/

Obama Camp ‘Flattered’ by Hamas Compliment as Jimmy Carter Visits

April 18, 2008

By Aaron Klein

WorldNetDaily
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Barack Obama’s campaign said yesterday it is “flattered” that Hamas’ endorsement of the Illinois senator compared him to John F. Kennedy, though it objects to any diplomatic contact with the terrorist group.“I like John Kennedy too,” said chief Obama strategist David Axelrod.

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http://www.worldnetdaily.com/index.php?fa=
PAGE.view&pageId=61852

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Jimmy Carter Calls on Hamas

(CBS/AP) Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter met a Hamas delegation from Gaza Thursday, part of a series of talks with the Islamic militant group that has drawn sharp criticism from U.S. and Israeli officials.

Carter spoke with Hamas officials in the West Bank Wednesday and angered Israelis when he embraced one of them. He plans to meet the group’s exiled political chief, Khaled Mashaal, in Damascus, Syria on Friday.

Read the rest:
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/04/17/
world/main4023091.shtml

 

 

Obama hit with obstacles on trail

April 18, 2008

By Christina Bellantoni and S.A. Miller
The Washington Times
April 18, 2008

PHILADELPHIA — Front-runner status brings unexpected headaches, and Sen. Barack Obama continues to show he’s not immune.
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Mr. Obama’s campaign yesterday was forced to reject an unsolicited endorsement by the Islamist terror group Hamas as the candidate worked to reassure leery Jewish voters, and his supporters derided Wednesday’s debate as unfair.

US Democratic presidential candidate Illinois Senator Barack ...
US Democratic presidential candidate Illinois Senator Barack Obama speaks during a townhall meeting at the Kerr Scott Building in Raleigh, North Carolina. Hillary Clinton and Obama set off Thursday on a five-day dash towards the Pennsylvania primary, as the endgame opens in their gruelling Democratic White House tussle.(AFP/Emmanuel Dunand)


In Pennsylvania, Mr. Obama’s prodigious fundraising is allowing him to flood the airwaves with ads to cut away rival Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton’s lead here, but voters say they can’t click the remote control without seeing the Democratic aspirant’s face — and even supporters think it’s too much.
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“Part of me says, yeah, I’m getting tired of that stuff because it’s been going on for so long but because we’re right up to the edge, I can handle it for the next couple of days,” said Jerry Bowers, an Obama volunteer from Mechanicsburg.
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Lots of ads are “part of the process,” he added.
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But a recent American Research Group (ARG) poll found 23 percent of likely voters in Pennsylvania”s primary Tuesday think the Obama ads — at least 14 different spots that have blanketed the airwaves from network news to MTV — are “excessive.” The ads promise change and outline his biography.

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http://www.washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080418/NATION/334729180/1001

Obama has unwittingly enhanced his image as the African American candidate

March 24, 2008

By Robert D. Novak
The Washington Post 
Monday, March 24, 2008; Page A13

Barack Obama‘s speech last week, hastily prepared to extinguish the firestorm over the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, won critical praise for style and substance but failed politically. By elevating the question of race in America, the front-running Democratic presidential candidate has deepened the dilemma created by his campaign’s success against the party establishment’s anointed choice, Hillary Clinton.

In rejecting the racist views of his longtime spiritual mentor but not disowning him, Obama has unwittingly enhanced his image as the African American candidate — as opposed to being just a remarkable candidate who happens to be black. That poses a dilemma for unelected superdelegates, who as professional politicians will settle the contest because neither Obama nor Clinton can win enough elected delegates to be nominated.

Superdelegates, though they were inclined toward Clinton as recently as three months ago, now flinch at the idea of rejecting Obama. They fear antagonizing African Americans, who have become the hard-core Democratic base. But what if national polls continue their post-Wright trend and show Obama trailing both Clinton and Republican John McCain in popular support? The Obama strategists’ hope of reversing that trend depends on whether his eloquent race speech, which he continued to reprise on the campaign trail all week, can overcome videos exposing his pastor’s demagoguery.

Thanks to proportional representation, which was enacted as part of radical Democratic reform a generation ago, no candidate can replicate George McGovern‘s nomination victory in 1972 by capturing winner-take-all primaries. It is not possible for Clinton to score large enough victories in the remaining nine primaries (starting with Pennsylvania on April 22) to move ahead of Obama in delegates or the accumulated popular vote. Those goals became unreachable with the apparent Clinton failure to force a revote in Michigan and Florida.

That means Clinton must convince superdelegates that Obama is not electable — validating this judgment by a neutral Democratic leader: “It was a great speech, but it cannot overcome the powerful [Wright] video.” Since Obama’s race declaration, he has fallen behind McCain nationally in various polls and trails by as much as eight percentage points in Rasmussen tracking.

In head-to-head tests with Clinton, he is two points behind in Rasmussen tracking and has slipped in other surveys, though he is still leading. Polls in Pennsylvania taken before Obama’s speech Tuesday showed that Clinton’s narrow lead had expanded to double digits, and private surveys since then indicate the margin is growing.

To combat that, the Obama high command privately contacted superdelegates Friday to report that his Pennsylvania and Indiana polling numbers have “come back” (without specifying by how much). Obama agents are also trying to minimize the distinctiveness of his embrace with Wright by distributing photos and letters showing Bill Clinton‘s contacts with the Chicago preacher in 1998, when the president was wooing friendly clergymen in his campaign against impeachment.

The problem for Obama is that furor over Wright has reached beyond voters normally interested in political controversies. Over the past week, I have been asked repeatedly by non-political people about Obama’s connection with Wright’s tirades. In the process, Obama’s political persona has been altered — transformed from Harvard Law Review to South Side activist, as described by one friendly Chicago politician.

The Clinton campaign has shied away from official comment about Wright. But in off-the-record talks with superdelegates, Clinton’s agents claim that the connection casts doubt on Obama’s electability. Furthermore, one Democratic operative who is inclined toward Obama warns that the issue will be raised in much harsher terms by Republicans during the general election campaign. In last week’s Clinton conference call with the media, senior adviser Harold Ickes questioned “whether Senator Obama is going to be able to stand up to the Republican attack machine.”

The consensus among knowledgeable Democrats is that Obama will win over enough superdelegates to clinch the nomination before the national convention in August, partly because of fear about the consequences if he does not. But one longtime associate said this of the Clintons in private conversation last week: “They will do anything — anything — to get nominated.” That reminder deepens the Democratic dilemma.

Goodbye “GlowBama”

March 22, 2008

By Michelle Malkin
The Washington Times
March 22, 2008

Barack Obama — the self-anointed soul-fixing, nation-healing political Messiah — has lost his glow. That is the takeaway from the beleaguered Democratic presidential candidate’s “major” speech in Philadelphia Tuesday.
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For all of his supposedly unique and transcendent understanding of race in America, Mr. Obama’s talk amounted to the same old, same old. The Glowbama mystique has gone the way of the emperor’s clothes. Instead of accountability, we got excuses. Instead of disavowal of demagoguery, we got whacked with the moral equivalence card. Instead of rejecting the Blame America mantra of left-wing black nationalism, we got more Blame Whitey. Same old, same old.
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For two decades, Mr. Obama tethered himself to a fire-breathing pastor peddling bitter Marxist “black liberation theology” in the name of God. Behind the “audacity of hope” was a grievance-mongering preacher animated by the voracity of hate. And understand this: The Rev. Jeremiah Wright and Barack Obama were not merely passing “associates.” They were mentor and mentored, guru and student, with fates and fortunes intertwined.
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., ... 
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., left, shown here with his pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright of Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, March 10, 2005. Obama on Friday March 14, 2008 denounced inflammatory remarks from his pastor, who has railed against the United States and accused the country of bringing on the Sept. 11 attacks by spreading terrorism.(AP Photo/Trinity United Church of Christ)
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For two decades, while using the church to build his Chicago power base and credibility in the black community, Mr. Obama turned a deaf ear to Mr. Wright’s AIDS conspiracy theories, class warfare rants, anti-Israel, anti-white raves, and “God d… America” diatribes. These weren’t occasional outbursts, but the bread and butter of the Trinity United Church of Christ. Now, Mr. Obama blames “talk show hosts and conservative commentators” for exposing Mr. Wright’s race-based rancor. Audacious, indeed.
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March 14, Mr. Obama attempted to minimize the extent to which he had been exposed to Mr. Wright’s poisonous politicking on the pulpit. “None of these statements were ones that I had heard myself personally in the pews,” he told Major Garrett of Fox News. “The other statements were ones that I just heard about while we were — when they started being run on Fox and some of the other stations. And so they weren’t things that I was familiar with.”
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Last Tuesday, Mr. Obama changed his tune: “I have already condemned, in unequivocal terms, the statements of Rev. Wright that have caused such controversy. For some, nagging questions remain. Did I know him to be an occasionally fierce critic of American domestic and foreign policy? Of course. Did I ever hear him make remarks that could be considered controversial while I sat in church? Yes.”
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The clever Sen. Obama has attempted to erect a firewall of protection from probing questions about which remarks he heard and tolerated and failed to object to while sitting in the pews. Dwelling on what he knew and where and when, he argued yesterday, would be “to simplify and stereotype and amplify the negative to the point that it distorts reality.”
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But it is Mr. Obama’s pastor (“former” pastor, he says now, though the pastor was a two-decade-long mentor) who has a warped view of reality. And it is Mr. Obama who distorts the truth by likening this Ward Churchill of the United Church of Christ to an avuncular yet lovable relative who cannot easily be renounced:

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http://www.washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080322/COMMENTARY/71600658

No dramatic thaw with China likely after Taiwan poll

March 16, 2008
By Ben Blanchard

BEIJING (Reuters) – Both Taiwan presidential candidates promise better ties with China, but whoever wins, chances of a dramatic or quick thaw in ties are unlikely as sensitive political problems will be tricky to tackle.

Taiwan's main opposition Nationalist Party (KMT) presidential ...
Taiwan’s main opposition Nationalist Party (KMT) presidential candidate Ma Ying-jeou speaks to supporters in front of a Taiwan flag during a campaign rally in Tainan March 16, 2008. Taiwan’s presidential election will be held on March 22.REUTERS/Nicky Loh (TAIWAN)

Nationalist candidate Ma Ying-jeou, the election front-runner, is seen as being more sympathetic to China, and many believe a President Ma would move fast to boost economic, trade and possibly political ties with Beijing.

Victory for his rival from the pro-independence Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), Frank Hsieh, could make a rapprochement harder, despite Hsieh promising a much more relaxed China policy than President Chen Shui-bian.

In a fresh example of their different approaches, both candidates criticized the recent violence in Tibet on Saturday, but only Hsieh tied it to Taiwan’s situation.
Taiwan's ruling Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) presidential ... 
Taiwan’s ruling Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) presidential candidate Frank Hsieh raises his hands with supporters during an election campaign in Tainan March 15, 2008. Hsieh condemned the violence in Tibet by the Chinese government on Saturday during a news conference. Taiwan’s presidential elections will be held on March 22.REUTERS/Pichi Chuang (TAIWAN)

“As we look at Tibet, we must think about our own fate,” said Hsieh.

Steve Tsang, Director of the Taiwan Studies Programme at Oxford University, said: “I think in the medium to long term you would see significant improvements in the relationship (if Ma wins), at least by way of easing of tensions.”

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080316/wl_nm/
taiwan_election_negotiations_dc_1

The plain things nobody can say

March 14, 2008

By Wesley Pruden
The Washington Times
March 14, 2008

We’re doomed to a bitter, rancid presidential campaign, fraught with peril, and not just for John McCain. For Barack Obama, too. And let’s not forget Hillary, as a lot of people are eager to do.
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The Obama campaign, if not necessarily the man himself, seems determined to make tough questioning of the man and his qualifications off-limits. Mild, general criticism is OK, barely, but pressing too hard with the wrong questions is taken for racism, bigotry, fanaticism, zealotry and other forms of treachery. Once upon a time, presidential candidates labored mightily to find a log-cabin birthplace in their past, but some Democrats think they’ve come up with a candidate born in a manger.
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As the sheen on the Obama image dissipates, as sheen surely will under the full weight of a presidential campaign, American voters will expect to indulge their right to say what they think about the candidates. If they must be ever-so-careful to criticize Barack Obama in the robust and rowdy way they feel free to criticize everybody else, reticence will quickly become resentment, and ultimately, just in time for November, revulsion. Sen. Obama deserves better.
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Racism, the unpardonable sin in modern America, has made race the unmentionable subject, no matter how delicately broached or innocently discussed. Such good faith as the speaker may bring to the conversation no longer counts for very much. With her airy comment to a California newspaper, the Torrance Daily Breeze, suggesting that Barack Obama wouldn’t be the marketing man’s dream if he were not a black man, Geraldine Ferraro made herself a candidate for boiling in oil. (Extra-virgin olive oil, you might be tempted to say, if she were anyone but an Italian-American.) She concedes she was chosen by Walter Mondale for his running mate because she was a woman and what she actually said about the senator from Illinois was inartfully phrased: “If Obama were a white man, he would not be in this position. He happens to be very lucky to be who he is. And the country is caught up in the concept.”
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This is what you can hear, privately expressed by any number of prominent Democrats, some of them white and some of them black. The Clintons have done themselves and, more important, the nation ill by their desperate and not-so-subtle invocation of race. Barack Obama is not wholly innocent, either. Bubba has taken heat, for example, for describing Sen. Obama’s description of his public record as “a fairy tale.” This sounds at first hearing a cruel dig at gays, but no, it was taken as a racist taunt. We weren’t told why.
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Now two more prominent Democrats have entangled themselves in the snare that is the mark of the campaign. Mark Penn, the chief Clinton strategist, told reporters that “we believe the Pennsylvania primary will show that Hillary is ready to win, and that Sen. Obama really can’t win the general election.”
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That’s one man’s opinion, worth less than what Hillary’s paying for it. He later tried to revise his remarks (but only congressmen get to do that, and only in the Congressional Record), saying that losing the Pennsylvania primary would raise questions about Sen. Obama’s ability to win. Then Nancy Pelosi, the House speaker, scoffed that there would be no “dream ticket” of Hillary and Obama, or of Obama and Hillary. “Take it from me,” she said. “That won’t be the ticket.”
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Knowing better, perhaps, she declined to say why. But she’s probably reflecting the conventional unstated wisdom in Washington: You can’t expect to break both the color line and the glass ceiling in one election. When someone asked the speaker what she thought of Geraldine Ferraro’s earlier remarks, she replied: “It’s important that perceptions be understood by the campaigns.”
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This is the kind of code speak we’re all required to use. It’s unfair to Barack Obama, it’s unfair to his opponents whoever they are, and it’s unfair to the rest of us. We’ll know we’ve eliminated racism, the real thing, when we can all talk like grown-ups, in front of one another.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/article/20080314/
NATION01/92656787

McCain: Uncompromising Pork Buster

March 11, 2008

By Robert D. Novak
The Washington Post
March 10, 2008

The congressional Republican establishment, with its charade of pretending to crack down on budget earmarks while in fact preserving its addiction to pork, faces embarrassment this week when the Democratic-designed budget is brought to the Senate floor. The GOP’s presumptive presidential nominee, Sen. John McCain, is an uncompromising pork buster with no use for the evasions by Republican addicts on Capitol Hill.

Sen. Jim DeMint, a first-term reform Republican from South Carolina, is to propose a one-year, no-loopholes moratorium on earmarks as a budget amendment. McCain has announced his support for the amendment and intends to co-sponsor it. DeMint wants to coordinate McCain’s visits to the Senate floor from the campaign trail so the candidate can be there to speak and vote for the moratorium.

The irony could hardly be greater. Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell, an ardent earmarker, is smart enough politically to realize how unpopular the practice is with the Republican base. Consequently, McConnell combines anti-earmark rhetoric with evasive tactics….

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 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/03/09/AR2008030901428.html?hpid=opinionsbox1

Back From Near Death Again: Cinderella McCain

March 6, 2008

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom
March 6, 2008

Encyclopedias define “cinderella” as one who unexpectedly achieves recognition or success after a period of obscurity and neglect.

Mr. McCain went to the United States Naval Academy and served as a naval aviator — but he was widely known for his rebel ways.  He was almost killed flying jets even before he went to Vietnam.

While flying combat missions from an aircraft carrier, McCain was shot down over Hanoi.  He landed in the water where his communist foes fished him out and beat him.  They took him to the infamous “Hanoi Hilton.”

He was now a Prisoner of War (POW) with severe injuries.

It is difficult to imagine a more unlikely fantasy that a Prisoner of War – tortured, alone, largely forgotten by the bulk of his countrymen, and lost in an un popular war – returning years later to win his party’s nomination for President of the United States.
Vietcapturejm01.jpg
 In a broadcast from North Vietnam, October 27, Radio Hanoi reported that an American pilot identified as Lieutenant Commander John Sydney McCain, U.S.N., was rescued from Truc Bac Lake near Hanoi, October 26, after parachuting from his crippled aircraft, which had been hit by North Vietnamese ground fire. The broadcast said that McCain had been pulled from the water by North Vietnamese soldiers, treated for injuries and jailed. This photo shows McCain in the water.

Add to that the fact that last summer Senator McCain’s campaign for the nation’s highest office was on its knees financially and morale in his inept staff was so low that the Senator had to entirely retool his campaign.

Rush Limbaugh hated Senator McCain and told the greater world so. And the Governor of Arkansas attacked him from the right.

Even the Democrats said they’d rather run against Senator McCain than Mitt Romney or the others.

If that is not enough, many Republican Party stalwarts, seeing Senator McCain dealing with and sponsoring bills with the likes of hated liberal Senators Kennedy and Feingold, claimed they’d rather vote Democrat or not at all.

And his wife had a well know drug addiction – now healed.

Finally (though there are more reasons Senator McCain is a cinderella), conservatives said McCain was flat wrong on immigration.

Yesterday, the President of the United States, George W. Bush, endorsed the McCain run for the presidency – meeting candidate McCain at the ceremonial entrance to the White House normally reserved for, well, presidents and heads of state.

Don’t count John McCain out.

A Vietnamese veteran of the war in Southeast Asia said to me, “He’s lucky to be alive. But what he has done since the end of his POW days is pure McCain.”