Archive for the ‘Buddhist’ Category

Thai Brewery’s Stock Listing Seen as Affront to Buddhism

October 30, 2008

 

By Tim Johnston
Washington Post Foreign Service
Thursday, October 30, 2008; Page A19

BANGKOK, Oct. 29 — Thai Beverages, the brewer of Thailand’s best-selling Chang Beer, has found itself straddling the uncomfortable point where markets and morals collide.

ThaiBev is trying to get a listing on the Stock Exchange of Thailand (SET) — its second attempt in three years — but as happened the first time around, it is running into heavy opposition from campaigners who argue that such a listing would encourage alcohol consumption.

Opponents of the listing handed a letter of protest to the Finance Ministry on Wednesday, and about 100 demonstrators held a rally outside the stock exchange Monday, some of them carrying signs of opposition.

Demonstrators say that if the company is listed, it would be in the interest of shareholders to encourage alcohol consumption, something that goes against the Buddhist principles of many Thai people.

But the volume of protest against the listing is substantially quieter than in 2005, when ThaiBev last attempted to get into the exchange. Mass protests forced it to withdraw its application, although subsequently it listed on the Singapore Stock Exchange.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/
2008/10/29/AR2008102904408.html

China in Dalai Lama talks offer

October 29, 2008

Chinese authorities are to arrange fresh talks with envoys of the Dalai Lama “in the near future”, the Chinese state news agency Xinhua has said.

From the BBC

The agency quoted an unnamed government official as saying the exiled spiritual leader of Tibet should “treasure this opportunity” and respond positively.

The Dalai Lama gestures as he begins three-days of Buddhist ... 
The Dalai Lama gestures as he begins three-days of Buddhist teachings in Dharamshala. China on Wednesday told Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama to treasure the opportunity of a fresh round of talks, as it confirmed the meeting would be held soon.(AFP/File/Lobsang Wangyal)

Last weekend, the Dalai Lama said he was losing hope that dialogue with China would achieve any settlement.

The Dalai Lama fled Tibet in 1959 after a failed uprising against Chinese rule.

Anti-China protests that erupted in March in Tibet – the worst in two decades – were crushed by Chinese security forces.

In the aftermath, China promised fresh talks over the disputed territory, but the Dalai Lama recently suggested such gestures were insincere.

‘Despite the riot’

Xinhua quoted the government official as saying that Chinese authorities would “arrange another round of contacts and negotiation with the private representatives of the Dalai Lama ‘in the near future’ at the request of the Dalai Lama side”.

The report said such talks would be held “despite the Lhasa riot in March and some serious disruptions and sabotages to the Beijing Olympic Games by a handful of ‘Tibet independence’ secessionists”.

Read the rest:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7696771.stm

Vietnam: Phat Tich Pagoda Restoration Begins

October 11, 2008

A woman touches up her make-up before a ceremony at Phat Tich ... 
A woman touches up her make-up before a ceremony at Phat Tich pagoda in Vietnam’s northern Bac Ninh province, 40 km (25 miles) north of Hanoi October 11, 2008. The traditional ceremony was held to mark the start of reparation works on the pagoda, one of the oldest in Vietnam. The Chinese character on the wall reads, “Buddha”.REUTERS/Kham (VIETNAM)

Women in traditional costumes hold offerings in front of a Buddha ... 
Women in traditional costumes hold offerings in front of a Buddha statue while performing during a ceremony at Phat Tich pagoda in Vietnam’s northern Bac Ninh province, 40 km (25 miles) north of Hanoi October 11, 2008. The traditional ceremony was held to mark the start of reparation works on the pagoda, one of the oldest in Vietnam.REUTERS/Kham (VIETNAM)

Activists: New Tibet protests break out

March 29, 2008
By JOE McDONALD, Associated Press Writer

BEIJING – Fresh protests broke out in the Tibetan capital Lhasa on Saturday as foreign diplomats wrapped up a tightly controlled visit organized by Beijing, a radio broadcaster and Tibetan activists reported.

A protest began Saturday afternoon at Lhasa’s Ramoche monastery and grew to involve “many people,” said Kate Saunders of the Washington-based International Campaign for Tibet.

Citing unnamed witnesses in the city, Saunders said the situation calmed down after a few hours. She had no information on injuries or arrests.

People also protested at the Jokhang Temple, a major Buddhist site in Lhasa, the government-in-exile of the Tibetan Buddhist leader, the Dalai Lama, said on its Web site. The India-based government gave no other details.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080329/ap_on_re_as/china_tibet;_ylt=
AkP8DwbeK1wLFUw6e2P1j.Cs0NUE

China’s Wen Open To Talks With Dalai Lama

March 20, 2008

By David R. Sands
The Washington Times
March 20, 2008
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China’s prime minister said yesterday that he would still be ready to negotiate directly with the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, under the right conditions, even as Beijing struggled to control the worst political violence in the remote region in decades.

Riot policemen stand guard behind barricades set to separate ...
Riot policemen stand guard behind barricades set to separate the Chinese side from the Tibetan side at a main street in Xiahe town, Gansu province, March 19, 2008.(Nir Elias/Reuters)

British Prime Minister Gordon Brown told lawmakers in London that his discussions with Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao indicated hope for a meeting, despite Beijing’s rhetoric accusing the Dalai Lama of instigating the anti-Chinese demonstrations in the provincial capital of Lhasa and other cities in Tibet.
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Zhang Qingli, Tibet’s Communist Party chief, called the clash that began a week ago a “life-or-death struggle with the Dalai Lama clique,” in an editorial in Tibet’s state-owned newspaper.
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But Mr. Brown said, “The premier told me that, subject to two things that the Dalai Lama has already said — that he does not support the total independence of Tibet and that he renounces violence — that [Mr. Wen] would be prepared to enter into dialogue with the Dalai Lama.”
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The Dalai Lama, breaking with some Tibetan separatist groups, has called for greater self-rule for Tibet inside China. But direct talks with the Beijing regime have stalled over differences about the size and powers of a Tibetan autonomous region.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080320/FOREIGN/12628175/1003

Dalai Lama Says He’ll Meet With Chinese President, Officials

DHARMSALA, India – The Dalai Lama says he’s willing to meet with Chinese leaders, including President Hu Jintao.

胡锦涛
Hu Jintao
Hu Jintao

But Tibet’s exiled Buddhist leader said Thursday he would not meet with Chinese leaders in Beijing unless there was “a real concrete development.” He said he would be happy to meet them elsewhere.

Chinese soldiers in riot gear walk towards the main square in ...
Chinese soldiers in riot gear walk towards the main square in the city of Kangding, located around 400 km (250 miles) west of Chengdu in Sichuan province March 20, 2008. China has been grappling to quell unrest in several Tibetan towns and villages in the country’s west, after Buddhist monk-led demonstrations in Tibet’s capital Lhasa turned violent on Friday. The government in recent days has asked foreigners in Tibet to leave and has suspended approving travel permits to the Himalayan region.
REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA)

Chinese officials have accused the Dalai Lama and his supporters of organizing violent clashes in Tibet in hopes of sabotaging this summer’s Beijing Olympics and promoting Tibetan independence.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080320/ap_on_re_as/
india_dalai_lama;_ylt=AvI
zT0lZwKMbZErXJtGUFUOs0NUE

China: Tibet a ‘Life-and-Death’ Battle; Dalai Lama an Evil “Wolf”

March 19, 2008
By Christopher Bodeen, Associated Press Writers  

BEIJING – China called the Dalai Lama a “wolf in monk’s robes” Wednesday and said it was locked in a “life-and-death battle” with his supporters after protests marking the biggest challenge to Chinese rule in Tibet in almost two decades.

State media, meanwhile, reported more than 100 people had surrendered to police in and around Tibet’s regional capital of Lhasa, where peaceful protests turned violent Friday.

The protests, which Beijing has accused the Dalai Lama of orchestrating, have focused international attention on China’s human rights record ahead of this summer’s Olympic Games in Beijing. The U.S. has called on China to address Tibetans’ grievances and engage in direct talks with the Dalai Lama, Tibet’s exiled Buddhist leader.

Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama gestures as he speaks ... 
China’s “Big Bad Wolf,” the Dalai Lama.  The Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama was speaking to the media in Dharmsala, India, Tuesday, March 18, 2008. The Dalai Lama threatened Tuesday to step down as leader of Tibet’s government in exile if violence committed by Tibetans in his homeland spirals out of control.
(AP Photo/Gurinder Osan)

But China has angrily rejected all calls for dialogue, and Tibet’s hardline Communist Party chief was quoted Wednesday in a particularly viscous attack on the Dalai Lama.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080319/ap_on_re_as/
china_tibet;_ylt=Ajgf
bY0cuioUMVF7z5f.4iSs0NUE

Tibetan monks shout slogans during a protest in New Delhi March ...
Tibetan monks shout slogans during a protest in New Delhi March 17, 2008. China said on Monday it had shown great restraint in the face of violent protests by Tibetans, which it said were orchestrated by followers of the Dalai Lama seeking to wreck the Beijing Olympics in August.REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA)

Tibet and the Ghosts of Tiananmen

March 18, 2008

By Bill Powell
Beijing
TIME Magazine

It is still nearly five months before the Olympic torch is to be lit in Beijing, officially starting the 29th summer Olympics. But, diplomats in the Chinese capital believe that a high level game of chicken has already begun, one that has now turned deadly – first, in Lhasa, the capital of what China calls the Tibet Autonomous Region, and now elsewhere, according to Tibetan exiles and human rights groups.

A demonstrator rallies against China's deadly crackdown ...
A demonstrator rallies against China’s deadly crackdown on pro-independence protesters in Tibet. The United States said Monday it would increase radio broadcasts to Tibet as China clamped down on media coverage of the bloody protests in the Himalayan territory.(AFP/Filippo Monteforte)

Yesterday, in China’s Sichuan province, at least eight bodies were brought to a Buddhist monastery in Aba prefecture, allegedly shot dead by Chinese riot control police, according to an eyewitness account quoted by Radio Free Asia. The escalating confrontation in and around Tibet is a nightmare for China’s top leadership, but one, some diplomats believe, that could not have taken anyone in the central government completely by surprise. It pits the leadership in Beijing against its domestic opponents – who include not only Tibetan dissidents, but also separatist groups in the heavily Muslim region of Xinjiang, as well as human rights and political activists throughout the country.

Each side understood that the months leading up to the Games would be “extremely sensitive,” as one diplomat put it. The government knew “from day one,” another diplomat told TIME, that “a successful bid for the games would bring an unprecedented – and in some cases very harsh – spotlight” on China and how it is governed. On the other side, everyone from human rights activists to independence seeking dissidents in Tibet and Xinjiang – “splittists” in the Chinese vernacular – knew they would have an opportunity to push their agendas while the world was watching. “Thought the specific trigger for this in Tibet is still unclear, that it intensified so quickly is probably not just an accident,” the senior diplomat says.

According to this view, it was never hard to imagine a scenario in which some group – and maybe several – would push things, try “to probe and see whether they could test limits.” The critical issue, now front and center, diplomats say, is just how far angry Tibetan activists will push – and how harshly the Chinese government will push back.

How extensive…

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/time/tibetandtheghost
softiananmen;_ylt=AvtWVC
y0vqipwpCCEjboCsWs0NUE

China Condemns Pro-Tibet Protests World-Wide

March 17, 2008
By AUDRA ANG, Associated Press Writers

BEIJING – China accused Tibetan supporters of the Dalai Lama of attacking its embassies around the world, vowing Monday to protect its territory as it clamped down on anti-government protests in Tibet.

Tibetan monks shout slogans during a protest in New Delhi March ...
Tibetan monks shout slogans during a protest in New Delhi March 17, 2008. China said on Monday it had shown great restraint in the face of violent protests by Tibetans, which it said were orchestrated by followers of the Dalai Lama seeking to wreck the Beijing Olympics in August.REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA)

The Foreign Ministry comments were the first comments by the central government since Tibetan protests against Chinese rule began on March 10. They came just hours before a midnight deadline set by Chinese authorities for protesters in the Tibetan capital Lhasa to surrender or face harsh consequences.

“The Chinese government will unwaveringly protect national sovereignty and territorial integrity,” spokesman Liu Jianchao said at a news conference.

The protests that began in Tibet have spilled over to neighboring provinces and even to the capital Beijing where students staged a sit-down demonstration on Monday. There have been sympathy protests around the world as well, many of them outside of Chinese diplomatic missions.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080317/ap_on_re_as/china_tibet;_ylt=AgWy1Ees
MFNE50Sb_1Qlc6as0NUE

For Vietnam Members of Congress Stand Up For Human Rights

January 31, 2008

January 23, 2008

The Honorable Michael Chertoff
Secretary
U.S. Department of Homeland Security
Washington, D.C. 20528

Dear Secretary Chertoff:

We are extremely concerned that thousands of Vietnamese nationals currently living in the United States may be forcibly returned to the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, a country with an extensive and continuing record of human rights violations. It is appalling and unbelievable that this Administration would even consider returning those who escaped Communism back to the clutches of the very Communists that they escaped.

According to an ICE press release, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the government of Vietnam today. This MOU will apparently permit the deportation of Vietnamese nationals who entered the United States on or after July 12, 1995.

In the 2006 Country Report on Human Rights Practices, the U.S. State Department described the human rights situation in Vietnam as “unsatisfactory”. The March 6, 2007 report documented a litany of human rights violations, including:

• Abuses by government officials for exercise of religious freedom;
• Prohibition of political opposition movements;
• Arbitrary arrest and detention for political activities;
• Governmental control over the press and the internet;
• Abuse of suspects during arrest, detention, and interrogation;
• Denial of fair and expeditious trials;
• Limitation of citizens’ privacy rights and freedom of speech, press, assembly, movement, and association;
• Prohibition of independent human rights organizations;
• Violence and discrimination against women, including limited child prostitution and trafficking in women and children;
• Societal discrimination of some ethnic minority groups; and
• Limitation of workers’ rights, especially to organize independently.

Likewise, the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) reported that “Vietnam has initiated a severe crackdown on human rights defenders and advocates for the freedoms of speech, association, and assembly, including many religious leaders.” In particular, USCIRF found that “[t]he Vietnamese government continues to remain suspicious of ethnic minority religious groups, such as Montagnard and Hmong Protestants and Khmer Buddhists; those who seek to establish independent religious organizations, such as the Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam, Hao Hoa, and Cao Dai; and those it considers to pose a threat to national solidarity or security, such as ‘Dega’ Protestants and individual Mennonite, Catholic, Buddhist, and house church Protestant leaders.”

In addition, respected non-governmental entities such as Amnesty International also documented wide-spread human rights violations in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam:
Restrictions on freedom of expression and association continued. Members of unauthorized churches seen as opposing state policies faced harassment. Dissidents using the Internet were harassed, threatened and imprisoned. Small groups of ethnic minority Montagnards continued to flee human rights violations in the Central Highlands and seek asylum in neighbouring Cambodia; at least 250 remained imprisoned after unfair trials in Viet Nam.

Given the rampant violations of human rights committed by the Socialist Republic of Vietnam as documented by our own State Department and other governmental and non-governmental experts, we are very troubled that ICE has entered into an agreement to deport Vietnamese nationals living in the United States into such conditions. We ask that you brief us personally on the MOU. In particular, we would like to know the process by which the agreement was reached, including whether ICE was aware of and considered the Socialist Republic of Vietnam’s human rights record in reaching the agreement. Furthermore, we insist that no implementation of this agreement take place until agreed to by Congress. We would appreciate your response no later than close of business on Friday, January 25, 2008.

Sincerely,

Zoe Lofgren
Ileana Ros-Lehtinen
Michael Honda
Lincoln Diaz-Balart
Loretta Sanchez
Mario Diaz-Balart
Linda Sanchez
Keith Ellison
Jim Costa
Dennis Cardoza
Ed Perlmutter
Al Green
Barbara Lee
Jim Costa

cc: Secretary Condolezza Rice, U.S. Department of State

Assistant Secretary Julie Myers, U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Vietnamese Calling for Democracy, Rule of Law

December 29, 2007
Buddhist dissident Thich Quang Do calls for democratic rights and freedoms to guarantee territorial integrity in Vietnam
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PARIS, 28th December 2007 (IBIB) – In the wake of widespread demonstrations staged by students and young people outside Chinese Embassies in Hanoi and Saigon, and strong protests by the Vietnamese community overseas, the Most Venerable Thich Quang Do, prominent dissident and Deputy leader of the outlawed Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam (UBCV) has issued a strong statement on the controversy over the disputed Paracel and Spratly archipelagos. Sent clandestinely from the Thanh Minh Zen Monastery in Saigon, it was received by the International Buddhist Information Bureau in Paris today.Writing on behalf of the UBCVâ’s Bi-Cameral leadership (the Institute of the Sangha and the Institute for the Dissemination of the Dharma), Thich Quang Do called on the Hanoi authorities to “pass the reins of power to the people in a society based on the separation of the three powers, multi-party democracy and the rule of law” as the best way to safeguard Vietnam’s sovereignty and territorial integrity.Because “three million Communist Party members and a 500,000-strong army have neither the authority nor the power to defend the homeland by military means, nor sufficient prestige and courage to expand political and diplomatic efforts to mobilize international support in our defence: they need the full participation of the 85 million Vietnamese population and the support of the Vietnamese Diaspora worldwide.”

As a first step, Hanoi must “immediately abrogate Article 4 of the Vietnamese Constitution [on the political monopoly of the Communist Party], and enable all sectors of the Vietnamese population, including all religious and political families, to freely and fully participate in the process of national salvation.”

The UBCV Deputy leader also called on Hanoi to summon the people for a “Dien Hong” Conference for the XXIst century to “initiate a process of reconciliation and democratic change.

Thich Quang Do emphasized the role of Buddhism as an essential element in this process :  “With our responsibility as Vietnamese citizens, and as representatives of a religion that has contributed to the foundation and development of our nation over the past 2,000 years, the Council of the Bi-Cameral Institute of the Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam cannot stand by silently whilst our country is in danger. We therefore solemnly appeal to the Vietnamese intelligentsia, inside and outside Vietnam, to stand together and rally forces to save our nation. The Council of the Bi-Cameral Institute of the Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam pledges to give its active support to every peaceful effort to protect our homeland and our people.”

Conclusion: With our responsibility as Vietnamese citizens, and as representatives of a religion that has contributed to the foundation and development of our nation over the past 2,000 years, the Council of the Bi-Cameral Institute of the Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam cannot stand by silently whilst our country is in danger. We therefore call upon the Vietnamese intelligentsia, inside and outside Vietnam, to stand together and rally forces to save our nation. The Council of the Bi-Cameral Institute of the Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam pledges to give its active support to every peaceful effort to protect our homeland and our people.For more information see:
INTERNATIONAL BUDDHIST INFORMATION BUREAU
(BUREAU INTERNATIONAL D’INFORMATION BOUDDHISTE)
Official information service of Vien Hoa Dao, Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam
B.P. 63 – 94472 Boissy Saint Léger cedex (France) – Tel.: Paris (331) 45 98 30 85
Fax : Paris (331) 45 98 32 61 – E-mail : ubcv.ibib@buddhist.com

Web : http://www.queme.net
Related:
Vietnam Sovereignty: Danger Signals