Archive for the ‘big three’ Category

Obama-Pelosi Stimulus May Fail to Reignite Economy

November 17, 2008

President-elect Barack Obama and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi may throw as much as half a trillion dollars worth of stimulus at the economy — and have little or no growth to show for it.

The forces arrayed against recovery, including the credit contraction and cutbacks by consumers, are so powerful that they may overwhelm the record sums of spending and tax cuts being discussed in Washington. The only consolation, economists say, is that without the stimulus, things would be even worse.

By Rich Miller, Bloomberg

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks during a news conference ...
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill.  Democrats in Congress Monday launched a new multi-billion dollar drive to save the US auto industry, but the White House warned against draining funds from a huge finance industry bailout.(AFP/Getty Images/File/Brendan Smialowski)

“It’s hard for me to imagine we’ll have a return to positive growth before the fourth quarter of 2009, even with a $500 billion stimulus,” says Barry Eichengreen, an economics professor at the University of California, Berkeley. He sees the unemployment rate rising to 9.5 percent in early 2010, from 6.5 percent now.

The first dose of fiscal medicine might come within weeks, following the return of Congress today for a lame-duck session, and would focus on stepped-up government spending. The balance, including a tax rebate, would come after Obama assumes the presidency in January.

Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Economy.com in West Chester, Pennsylvania, says the economy may contract 2 percent next year without a package of at least $300 billion. With it, “we could get growth pretty close to zero,” he adds. That would still be the worst result since 1991.

A `Bolder’ Approach

“The breadth and potential depth” of the crisis call for a “bolder” approach, Obama economic adviser Gene Sperling said in congressional testimony Nov. 13. A package costing $300 billion to $400 billion “should be the starting point….

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/bloomberg/20081117/pl_bloomberg/aez
5fruymj4q;_ylt=Ak9FS0yn8CqAZ9eabFQuVA2s0NUE

Top Republican senators oppose automaker bailout

November 16, 2008

Top Republican senators said Sunday they will oppose a Democratic plan to bail out Detroit automakers, calling the U.S. industry a “dinosaur” whose “day of reckoning” is coming. Their opposition raises serious doubts about whether the plan will pass in this week’s postelection session.

Democratic leaders want to use $25 billion of the $700 billion financial industry bailout to help General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler LLC.

By Stephen Ohlemacher, Associated Press Writer

Sens. Richard Shelby of Alabama and Jon Kyl of Arizona said it would be a mistake to use any of the Wall Street rescue money to prop up the automakers. They said an auto bailout would only postpone the industry’s demise.
Richard Shelby
Senator Shelby

“Companies fail every day and others take their place. I think this is a road we should not go down,” said Shelby, the senior Republican on the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee.

General Motors headquarters is seen October 26, 2008 in Detroit, ... 
General Motors headquarters is seen October 26, 2008 in Detroit, Michigan. Picture taken October 26, 2008.(Rebecca Cook/Reuters)

“They’re not building the right products,” he said. “They’ve got good workers but I don’t believe they’ve got good management. They don’t innovate. They’re a dinosaur in a sense.”

Added Kyl, the Senate’s second-ranking Republican: “Just giving them $25 billion doesn’t change anything. It just puts off for six months or so the day of reckoning.”

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said over the weekend that the House would provide aid to the ailing industry, though she did not put a price on her plan.

“The House is ready to do it,” said Democratic Rep. Barney Frank of Massachusetts, chairman of the House Financial Services Committee. “There’s no downside to trying.”
Rep. Barney Frank, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Sen. Christopher J. Dodd were among the congressional Democrats negotiating the bailout settlement on Sunday. (Joseph Silverman/The Washington Times)

Above: Ready to bail, from L to R: Rep. Barney Frank, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Sen. Christopher J. Dodd. Photo by Joseph Silverman

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081116/ap_on_go
_co/auto_bailout;_ylt=AmAt77VLR57r0Uq41kBoeYWs0NUE

Auto Maker Bailout “Doubtful”

November 14, 2008

A senior Democratic senator raised doubts on Thursday that an attempt to bail out U.S. automakers had enough support to clear Congress this year. 

As Republicans amplified their concerns about a bailout, Senate Banking Committee Chairman Christopher Dodd raised the biggest red flag for fellow Democrats trying to craft a $25 billion rescue and pass it during a post-election session set to start next week.
.
By John Crawley and Rachelle Younglai, Reuters 

“Right now, I don’t think there are the votes,” Dodd of Connecticut told reporters about prospects in the Senate. “I want to be careful of bringing up a proposition that might fail,” he said.

Although Dodd said “we ought to do something” and personally backed using money from the ongoing $700 billion financial services rescue program to help Detroit, he was skeptical that enough Republicans would support a bailout.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, a Nevada Democrat, also cautioned that success of a bailout rests with Senate Republicans and the White House. With their slim majority, Democrats cannot force a measure through the Senate or trump a White House veto.

The White House opposes the approach being taken by congressional Democrats but has not threatened to block any bailout. Bush administration officials have said they would consider other steps Congress can take to help General Motors Corp, Ford Motor Co and Chrysler LLC.

Dodd said there have been “legitimate issues raised” about how to help.

Read the rest:
http://www.reuters.com/article/marketsNews/idINN1339
368420081114?rpc=44

Can Washington save the Big Three automakers?

November 9, 2008

With the Big Three US automakers teetering on the edge of insolvency, it appears Washington may finally be ready to come to Detroit’s rescue.

Only hours after both General Motors and Ford Motor Co. announced large third-quarter losses — and stressed that they are both rapidly running out of cash — President-elect Barack Obama focused on the industry’s plight during his first news conference since Tuesday’s election.


Above: 1910 Ford Model T

“I have made it a high priority for the transition team to work on additional policy options to help the auto industry adjust,” Obama told reporters gathered in Chicago.

AFP

Just how bad a situation the automakers are facing was hammered home on Friday, when GM reported a 2.5 billion dollar net loss for the third quarter, bringing to nearly 57 billion dollars its losses since the beginning of 2005.

Ford’s 129 million dollar quarterly loss, meanwhile, brought to nearly 24.5 billion dollars the deficit it has run up since plunging into the red in 2006.

Yet the losses only partially state the true depth of the problem for the automakers.

Going into the third quarter, GM had 21 billion dollars on its books. By the end of September, that had plunged to 16.2 billion dollars, coming perilously close to the 11 billion to 14 billion dollars it says it needs on hand to keep the company operating.

GM logo
Ford burned through 7.7 billion dollars in the quarter, though its reserves are nearly twice as richer thanks to a massive line of credit it acquired last year.

Though it doesn’t report its full financial data, the privately-held Chrysler LLC is also thought to be fast running out of cash: one reason, analysts believe, why its parent, Cerberus Capital Management, was so eager to sell Chrysler to GM.

That deal, however, was scuttled by GM, and observers believe Cerberus may now rush to find another buyer as the economy continues to worsen.

“I doubt there’s anyone who challenges the fact that we’re operating in difficult times, perhaps as difficult as we’ve ever faced in the auto industry,” GM Chairman and CEO Rick Wagoner said during a Friday conference call with reporters and industry analysts.

Detroit’s situation has certainly worsened in the face of the current economic crisis that combines what many describe as a “perfect storm” of factors, such as high fuel costs, tight credit, job losses and rising commodity prices.

 

But the seeds of the current crisis date back to the last big oil shock, of 1979, which helped the Japanese gain a foothold for small, fuel-efficient products.

As gas lines faded from memory, the Asian automakers continued to gain ground by focusing on quality, something GM, Ford and Chrysler have only recently come to grips with — and with varying degrees of success.

Further compounding the situation, Detroit has been consciously slow to embrace changes in the American automotive marketplace, especially the shift from big trucks to small, fuel-efficient passenger cars.

And even where it has, lamented Consumer Reports’ auto analyst David Champion, it has needed “more models that were exciting for people to buy.”

Again, Detroit has begun to address that complaint, and a flood of more fuel-efficient — and exciting — models are on tap to debut over the next several years. The challenge now will be to keep that flow going.

GM President Fritz Henderson said Friday the automaker will have to cut back on some product programs in order to ensure liquidity.

Read the rest:
http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=081108175210.5dfg9d6x&show_article=1