Archive for the ‘anti-American’ Category

Race, Rice and Obama

April 3, 2008

By Debra J. Saunders
The Washington Times
April 3, 2008

I won’t be crying a river for Barack Obama, who is getting a taste of what it is like to be clobbered because of a sound bite. Since the [Reverend] Wright story erupted, Mr. Obama argued on the TV show “The View” that the “endless loop” of visual “snippets” from Mr. Wright’s sermons do not tell who Mr. Wright is.
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Of course, they don’t. But when radio talk-show host Don Imus dissed young black female athletes, Mr. Obama said, “There is nobody on my staff who would still be working for me if they made any comment like that about anybody of any ethnic group.”
During his appearance last week on ABC's
Senator Obama at Trinity United Church of Christ

Related:
Obama’s Church Founded on “Destruction of White Enemy”
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If there is a Wright backlash, it will exist, in part, as a rejection of the cycle of gaffe-and-pile-on that serves as a proxy for political debate in Washington. Is that small-minded? Sure. Live by the sound bite, die by the sound bite.

Related:
Obama’s Church Founded on “Destruction of White Enemy”

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080403/COMMENTARY/56201600

Racism concerns no stranger to pulpit

March 21, 2008

By Jennifer Harper
The WashingtonTimes
March 21, 2008

The tone and ferocity of the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr.’s comments about American racism which came to national attention last week may not be typical in many mainstream black churches. The content — concerns that racism persists — still surfaces at many pulpits, however.
Jeremiah Wright greeting President Bill Clinton during a 1998 prayer breakfast at the White House, to which Clinton had hand chosen Wright to attend.

Jeremiah Wright greeting President Bill Clinton during a 1998 prayer breakfast at the White House, to which Clinton had hand chosen Wright to attend.

“Inflammatory rhetoric is certainly a minor approach to congregations within black Christian circles. That rhetoric needs to be criticized. But the larger agenda Reverend Wright is pointing to, the deep frustration over racism, is a common theme preached at black churches across the country,” said Anthony B. Pinn, a professor of religious studies at Rice University.
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“The topic is viable. The rhetoric is not,” Mr. Pinn added.
“No one can rationally attribute to an estimated 56,000 black American churches the comments of a black pastor in a black church which is a member of a white liberal denomination — the United Church of Christ,” said the Rev. Eugene F. Rivers III of the Azusa Christian Community in Dorchester, Mass.
“Everyone gets the point that those quotes were indefensible and over the top. Everybody gets that,” he said.
Supporters say that the Rev. Jeremiah Wright is misunderstood.
Rev. Jeremiah Wright
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Mr. Wright, who recently retired from the 8,000-member Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, has been family pastor and spiritual guide to Sen. Barack Obama for years. .
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Mr. Wright’s sermons have included stark references to racism. In a highly publicized speech Tuesday, Mr. Obama affirmed his friendship with his pastor but repudiated his extreme opinions.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080321/NATION/961532533/1001

A Speech That Fell Short

March 19, 2008

By Michael Gerson
The Washingon Post 
Wednesday, March 19, 2008; Page A15
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Barack Obama has run a campaign based on a simple premise: that words of unity and hope matter to America. Now he has been forced by his charismatic, angry pastor to argue that words of hatred and division don’t really matter as much as we thought.
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Obama’s speech in Philadelphia yesterday made this argument as well as it could be made. He condemned the Rev. Jeremiah Wright‘s views in strong language — and embraced Wright as a wayward member of the family. He made Wright and his congregation a symbol of both the nobility and “shocking ignorance” of the African American experience — and presented himself as a leader who transcends that conflicted legacy. The speech recognized the historical reasons for black anger — and argued that the best response to those grievances is the adoption of Obama’s own social and economic agenda.
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It was one of the finest political performances under pressure since John F. Kennedy at the Greater Houston Ministerial Association in 1960. It also fell short in significant ways.
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The problem with Obama’s argument is that Wright is not a symbol of the strengths and weaknesses of African Americans. He is a political extremist, holding views that are shocking to many Americans who wonder how any presidential candidate could be so closely associated with an adviser who refers to the “U.S. of KKK-A” and urges God to “damn” our country. .
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Obama’s excellent and important speech on race in America did little to address his strange tolerance for the anti-Americanism of his spiritual mentor.
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Take an issue that Obama did not specifically confront yesterday. In a 2003 sermon, Wright claimed, “The government lied about inventing the HIV virus as a means of genocide against people of color.”
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This accusation does not make Wright, as Obama would have it, an “occasionally fierce critic of American domestic and foreign policy.” It makes Wright a dangerous man. He has casually accused America of one of the most monstrous crimes in history, perpetrated by a conspiracy of medical Mengeles. .
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If Wright believes what he said, he should urge the overthrow of the U.S. government, which he views as guilty of unspeakable evil.
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If I believed Wright were correct, I would join him in that cause.
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But Wright’s accusation is batty, reflecting a sputtering, incoherent hatred for America. And his pastoral teaching may put lives at risk because the virus that causes AIDS spreads more readily in an atmosphere of denial, quack science and conspiracy theories.
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Obama’s speech implied that these toxic views are somehow parallel to the stereotyping of black men by Obama’s grandmother, which Obama said made him “cringe” — both are the foibles of family. But while Grandma may have had some issues to work through, Wright is accusing the American government of trying to kill every member of a race. There is a difference.
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Yet didn’t George Bush and other Republican politicians accept the support of Jerry Falwell, who spouted hate of his own? Yes, but they didn’t financially support his ministry and sit directly under his teaching for decades.
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The better analogy is this: What if a Republican presidential candidate spent years in the pew of a theonomist church — a fanatical fragment of Protestantism that teaches the modern political validity of ancient Hebrew law? What if the church’s pastor attacked the U.S. government as illegitimate and accepted the stoning of homosexuals and recalcitrant children as appropriate legal penalties (which some theonomists see as biblical requirements)? Surely we would conclude, at the very least, that the candidate attending this church lacked judgment and that his donations were subsidizing hatred. And we would be right.
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In Philadelphia, Obama attempted to explain Wright’s anger as typical of the civil rights generation, with its “memories of humiliation and doubt and fear.” But Wright has the opposite problem: He ignored the message of Martin Luther King Jr. and introduced a new generation to the politics of hatred.
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King drew a different lesson from the oppression he experienced: “I’ve seen too much hate to want to hate myself; hate is too great a burden to bear. I’ve seen it on the faces of too many sheriffs of the South. . . . Hate distorts the personality. . . . The man who hates can’t think straight; the man who hates can’t reason right; the man who hates can’t see right; the man who hates can’t walk right.”
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Barack Obama is not a man who hates — but he chose to walk with a man who does.

Senator Obama: “Give Me A Break”

March 17, 2008

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom 

After 20 years attending the same church with the same pastor and donating $22,000.00 to the church in one year, Senator Obama apparently wants Americans to believe that he didn’t hear any of his pastor’s anti-White and Anti-American rantings — and nobody ever made him aware of these ugly “sermons.”

I attend a church called “Holy Martyrs of Vietnam.”  I can assure you, if the pastor told the congregation that the U.S. government was helping the HIV/AIDS epidemic along as a form of genocide against “persons of color” I would hear about it.

I would know.

And I don’t even speak Vietnamese very much: practically the only language spoken in this church.

Yet Senator Obama’s pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. told his congregation that the Government of the United States was waging a war of genocide against people of color using HIV/AIDS.
The Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. performed Barack Obama's wedding ceremony and held a largely ceremonial role on a campaign committee.
The Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. performed Barack Obama’s wedding ceremony and held a role on an Obama for President campaign committee. (Photo by E. Jason Wambsgans — Chicago Tribune)

And the Senator was clueless.

Even after the Senator was informed, he refused to say he would no longer attend this “church,” which is really a house of hate speech.

The Senator is either stupid or lying to the American people or naive or a gross combination of all three.

Or he thinks I am stupid or naive.

I know I’ll be called a racist for this.  That’s the way the Obama machine wages counter-attacks.

Or I’ll be told I don’t understand “Black Culture,” which is what some people said when I wrote about Michael Vick’s stupid and illegal dog fighting escapades.

This isn’t good “Black Culture” any more than suicide bombers represent Islam and the teachings of the Koran.

This is a twisting together of “religion” and hate.  And I deplore it.

And I tell you in all honesty: any person of any color who tells me the U.S. government is intentionally killing off its citizens by any means deserves condemnation — unless certain proof can be put on the table.

Some of Rev. Wright’s sermons have been called “revolutionary,” inflammatory” and “unAmerican.”  And no wonder.

Rev. Wright, former pastor (although the church’s web site says he is still pastor) at Chicago’s Trinity United Church of Christ, married the Senator and his wife, baptized his children and preached to him on Sundays for about 20 years.  Senator Obama told Major Garrett of the Fox News Network that he frequently made donations to the church and hired Rev. Wright to assist as a campaign advisor. 

Senator Obama also prayed with Rev. Wright before the Senator announced his run for the presidency.

In a sermon on the Sunday after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, Wright suggested the United States brought on the attacks.

“We bombed Hiroshima, we bombed Nagasaki, and we nuked far more than the thousands in New York and the Pentagon, and we never batted an eye,” Wright said. “We have supported state terrorism against the Palestinians and black South Africans, and now we are indignant because the stuff we have done overseas is now brought right back to our own front yards. America’s chickens are coming home to roost.”

In a 2003 sermon, he said Blacks should condemn the United States.

“The government gives them the drugs, builds bigger prisons, passes a three-strike law and then wants us to sing ‘God Bless America.’ No, no, no, God damn America, that’s in the Bible for killing innocent people. God damn America for treating our citizens as less than human. God damn America for as long as she acts like she is God and she is supreme.”

He also gave a sermon in December comparing Obama to Jesus, promoting his candidacy and criticizing his rival, Hillary Rodham Clinton.

“Barack knows what it means to be a black man to be living in a country and a culture that is controlled by rich white people,” Wright told a cheering congregation. “Hillary can never know that. Hillary ain’t never been called a nigger.”

Well, I am sorry Senator Obama, but if these are samples of the “sermons” and “prayer” eminating from your “church,” you have lost my vote.
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I agree with Juan Williams of National Public Radio, Senator.  A United States Senator should not participate with a group of people who cheers remarks like those of Rev. Wright.  He should stand up and set he record straight.
Juan Williams

Photo: Stephen Voss ©2007 NPR

And a man seeking the vote and confidence of all Americans who stays in a church that cheers comments like Rev. Wright’s is a loser.

I don’t agree with Bill Clinton much.

The former President said during the New Hampshire primary about Senator Obama, “Give me a break. This whole thing is the biggest fairy tale I’ve ever seen.”

Mister President, you seem to have spoken too soon.  But I agree with you now — on this one.

Change from within in Iran?

March 14, 2008

USA Today
Commentary

The dangers posed by Iran can hardly be ignored. Tehran continues to enrich uranium and could restart its nuclear weapons program at any time. It has been undeterred by sanctions. Its virulently anti-American president has called for the destruction of Israel and supports Middle East terrorism. Its regional influence is growing — in part because it is no longer held in check by one-time ene
my Saddam Hussein. The United States has accused it of being behind attacks on U.S. forces in Iraq.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/usatoday/20080314/cm_usatoday/changefromwithi
niniran;_ylt=AjEF8Hn4v3o_z6Jypz4jRkWs0NUE

Obama’s Pastor Known for “Inflammatory Rhetoric”

March 13, 2008

Obama’s Pastor, Rev. Jeremiah Wright, Has a History of What Even Obama’s Campaign Aides Say Is ‘Inflammatory Rhetoric’

ABC News

The Rev. Jeremiah Wright, Obama’s pastor for the last 20 years at the Trinity United Church of Christ on Chicago’s south side, has a long history of what even Obama’s campaign aides concede is “inflammatory rhetoric,” including the assertion that the United States brought on the 9/11 attacks with its own “terrorism.”

In a campaign appearance earlier this month, Sen. Obama said, “I don’t think my church is actually particularly controversial.” He said Rev. Wright “is like an old uncle who says things I don’t always agree with,” telling a Jewish group that everyone has someone like that in their family.

Barack Obama, Rev. Jeremiah Wright

Rev. Wright married Obama and his wife Michelle, baptized their two daughters and is credited by Obama for the title of his book, “The Audacity of Hope.”

An ABC News review of dozens of Rev. Wright’s sermons, offered for sale by the church, found repeated denunciations of the U.S. based on what he described as his reading of the Gospels and the treatment of black Americans.

“The government gives them the drugs, builds bigger prisons, passes a three-strike law and then wants us to sing ‘God Bless America.’ No, no, no, God damn America, that’s in the Bible for killing innocent people,” he said in a 2003 sermon. “God damn America for treating our citizens as less than human. God damn America for as long as she acts like she is God and she is supreme.”

In addition to damning America, he told his congregation on the Sunday after Sept. 11, 2001 that the United States had brought on al Qaeda’s attacks because of its own terrorism.

“We bombed Hiroshima, we bombed Nagasaki, and we nuked far more than the thousands in New York and the Pentagon, and we never batted an eye,” Rev. Wright said in a sermon on Sept. 16, 2001.

“We have supported state terrorism against the Palestinians and black South Africans, and now we are indignant because the stuff we have done overseas is now brought right back to our own front yards. America’s chickens are coming home to roost,” he told his congregation.

Sen. Obama told the New York Times he was not at the church on the day of Rev. Wright’s 9/11 sermon. “The violence of 9/11 was inexcusable and without justification,” Obama said in a recent interview. “It sounds like he was trying to be provocative,” Obama told the paper.

Rev. Wright, who announced his retirement last month, has built a large and loyal following at his church with his mesmerizing sermons, mixing traditional spiritual content and his views on contemporary issues.

“I wouldn’t call it radical. I call it being black in America,” said one congregation member outside the church last Sunday.

“He has impacted the life of Barack Obama so much so that he wants to portray that feeling he got from Rev. Wright onto the country because we all need something positive,” said another member of the congregation.

Rev. Wright, who declined to be interviewed by ABC News, is considered one of the country’s 10 most influential black pastors, according to members of the Obama campaign.

Obama has praised at least one aspect of Rev. Wright’s approach, referring to his “social gospel” and his focus on Africa, “and I agree with him on that.”

Sen. Obama declined to comment on Rev. Wright’s denunciations of the United States, but a campaign religious adviser, Shaun Casey, appearing on “Good Morning America” Thursday, said Obama “had repudiated” those comments.

In a statement to ABCNews.com, Obama’s press spokesman Bill Burton said, “Sen. Obama has said repeatedly that personal attacks such as this have no place in this campaign or our politics, whether they’re offered from a platform at a rally or the pulpit of a church.

Sen. Obama does not think of the pastor of his church in political terms. Like a member of his family, there are things he says with which Sen. Obama deeply disagrees. But now that he is retired, that doesn’t detract from Sen. Obama’s affection for Rev. Wright or his appreciation for the good works he has done.”

Putin lashes out at West and domestic critics at election rally

November 21, 2007

By Anna Smolchenko
Internatioanl Herald Tribune
November 21, 2007

In one of his most aggressive attacks on opponents to date, President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday accused foreign governments and domestic opposition of seeking to turn Russia into a “weak and ill” state and warned against the return of oligarchs and other figures from the 1990s, when the Russian economy indeed was feeble.

“Our opponents want to see us disunited,” Putin told about 5,000 supporters gathered in a sports stadium to rally around the man who has presided over eight years of oil-based growth and is leading the dominant United Russia party into Dec. 2 parliamentary elections. “Some want to take away and divide everything, and others to plunder,” Putin said.

“They will now come out into the streets – got a crash course from foreign experts, got trained in neighboring republics and will try here now,” Putin said, apparently referring to opposition activists who plan to take to Russian streets this weekend. Putin and his government have long accused the West of training the organizers of successful anti-government revolutions in recent years in Ukraine and Georgia.

Read the rest:
http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/11/21/europe/
russia.php?WT.mc_id=rssfrontpage

The path to a better Middle East goes through Ankara

October 22, 2007

What Ms. Pelosi seems to have missed….

The Wall Street Journal
Saturday, October 20, 2007

Some day, we may look back on this week as a turning point in America’s relations with its closest Muslim ally, Turkey, and perhaps for the entire Middle East. Unfortunately, only a seer can say whether it’ll be a turn for the better.

The ructions over the House’s foray into Ottoman history and Turkey’s threat to invade northern Iraq don’t look good. But clear-eyed leaders will spot an opportunity in this crisis to renew an alliance for this difficult new era. American and Turkish interests overlap, and the countries need each other as much as they did during the Cold War.

The more sober politicians in Washington and Ankara understand this. Wednesday’s parliamentary approval of a possible Turkish incursion to chase down Kurdish terrorists in their Iraqi hideouts was remarkable for its restraint. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan waited more than a week after the latest strike by the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (or PKK) killed 13 Turkish soldiers to bring up the measure. No democratic government could ignore such attacks and the growing public outrage.

The Turks have also ruled out any rash move into northern Iraq. Ankara would prefer that the Iraqi Kurds and U.S. squeeze the PKK hiding in the Qandil mountains and avoid the risks of launching its own incursion. The vote this week is a wake-up call from the Turks–not least to the Iraqi Kurds, who have an opening to improve ties with their most important neighbor.

Meanwhile, with uncanny timing, Congressional Democrats this week were about to stick a finger in Turkey’s eye. Whether the massacres of up to 1.5 million Armenians in eastern Anatolia in 1915 constitute “genocide,” as a nonbinding House resolution declares, is a matter for historians. In the here and now, the resolution would erode America’s influence with Ankara and endanger the U.S. effort in Iraq. Worse, Mr. Erdogan’s ability to work with Washington would be constrained by an anti-American backlash.Speaker Nancy Pelosi began the week promising to bring the resolution to the House floor. But she is now having second thoughts–if not out of good sense, then because her rank-and-file are peeling away as they are lobbied against the anti-Turk resolution by the likes of General David Petraeus. Republican Speaker Dennis Hastert tabled a similar resolution when asked by President Clinton in 2000, and we’ll soon see if Ms. Pelosi will do the same for a Republican President.

The PKK also reads the papers, and its leaders timed their attacks on consecutive weekends this month as the resolution moved through the House. The Marxist separatist group, whose 20-year war has claimed almost 40,000 lives, would love to divide the U.S. from Turkey. Unless managed right, the Turkish response this week also imperils improving bilateral ties between Ankara and Baghdad; the countries had only recently signed a counterterrorism pact. In Turkey itself, PKK support is dwindling, and Mr. Erdogan’s ruling party swept the Kurdish-majority areas in July’s elections.

To avoid the trap set by the PKK, the U.S. needs to press the Iraqi Kurds to act against them. This doesn’t have to hurt America’s friendly dealings with the Kurds. But someone has to remind Massoud Barzani, the president of Iraq’s Kurdish region, that the PKK poses a grave threat to the economic boom and stability of northern Iraq. His aggressive rhetoric toward Turkey, and the Kurdish peshmerga militia’s disinterest in cracking down on the PKK, gives the wrong impression of complicity with the terrorists. With typical bluster, Mr. Barzani yesterday said he’d fight the Turks–hardly helpful.

Short of declaring war on the PKK, the peshmerga could easily cut off supply lines of food and arms into the Qandil mountains. The Turks want the U.S. to nab a few big PKK fish, which is easier said than done. But Ankara isn’t unreasonable to expect to see more of an effort. In return, its troops can stay on their side of the border.

This hasn’t been an easy year for Turkey. For most of it, Mr. Erdogan and his neo-Islamist party fought a cold war with the country’s secular establishment, led by the military. His commanding election victory in July ended that political crisis, only to see Congress and the PKK distract anew from his primary task, which is building the Muslim world’s most vibrant free-market democracy.Turkey wants a unitary, stable and prosperous Iraq, and should know that any wrong moves in the north could jeopardize that. The Turks unabashedly support Israel’s right to exist and can’t abide a nuclear Iran. On these and other issues, Ankara is an indispensable partner for America. Mr. Erdogan is expected to meet President Bush next month to discuss Iraqi Kurdistan and probably the Armenian resolution. The U.S.-Turkey friendship is too important to let it be ruined by parochial politics in either country.

Related:

Pandering Pelosi-crats

Iraq and Turkey See Tensions Rise After Ambush

Pelosi: Our Candidate for “Catch and Release”