Archive for the ‘animosity’ Category

Polarities persist in Democratic race

March 15, 2008

By  CALVIN WOODWARD, Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON – Something happened to the feel-good, way-cool Democratic presidential contest in the months since a woman and a black man began their path-breaking race for the White House.

Democratic presidential hopeful, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, ...
Democratic presidential hopeful, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., greets supporters during a campaign stop at The Forum, Tuesday, March 11, 2008, in Harrisburg, Pa.(AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

By the millions, black voters voted for the black candidate and women voted for the woman. White men seemed torn, by the millions.

Sen. Barack Obama has broken historic barriers, especially among the young, as the first black candidate with a serious chance at the presidency. Voters who might ordinarily balk at a female president have backed Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton in her pioneering effort.

Those gains have not been enough to erase divisions by race, a task perhaps beyond any mortal and any one election, nor lesser ones between the sexes.

And when the campaign moves beyond Democrats, the party of diversity, and into the general election, it’s questionable how much room is left for such progress.

A significant minority of voters in Democratic contests have considered the race or sex of the candidates important — about one in five in each case. That’s according to surveys of voters in about two dozen states across the country on and since Super Tuesday.

Whether clumsy, coarse or calculating, remarks by party stalwarts or hangers-on have brought race repeatedly into the discomfort zone, which is easy to do, suggesting a post-racial political consciousness is for a more distant future.

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http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080315/ap_on_el_pr/
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Japan urges China to sway global issues

December 28, 2007
By ANITA CHANG, Associated Press Writer

BEIJING – Japan urged China to use its growing influence to make an impact on key global issues such as climate change as the visiting Japanese prime minister opened a day of summit talks Friday with Chinese leaders.

The countries have a history of animosity stemming from disputes over territory, resources and wartime history, but Yasuo Fukuda’s four-day visit — his first as prime minister — follows several friendly meetings between leaders and a Chinese warship’s historic port call to Japan.

“In the long history of our relations, there has never been a time when Japan and China has had more influence or responsibilities in Asia and the world,” Fukuda said at a joint news conference with Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao.

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http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071228/ap_on_re_as/china_japan_summit;_
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